Now showing items 1-7 of 7

    • magazineArticle

      Anatomy of the prawn industry in crisis: Taiwan experience 

      Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center, Aquaculture Department - Aqua Farm News, 1989 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
    • Conference paper

      Effects of salinity on growth of young milkfish, Chanos chanos 

      F Hu & IC Liao - In Proceedings of the International Milkfish Workshop Conference, May 19-22, 1976, Tigbauan, Iloilo, Philippines, 1976 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
      Growth of young milkfish was studied at different levels of salinity over a period 68 days. Results suggested that young milkfish reared in freshwater or less saline sea water grew faster than in sea water. The increase in body weight was neither due to the increase in water content nor increase in feeding rate. The difference in growth rate might be attributed to the deviation from the original acclimating salinity. Mechanisms of the effect of salinity in retarding or accelerating milkfish growth should be investigated in the future.
    • magazineArticle

      [Grouper aquaculture] industry trends 

      Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center, Aquaculture Department - Aqua Farm News, 1992 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
    • magazineArticle

      Kaleidoscope of the prawn industry 

      Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center, Aquaculture Department - Aqua Farm News, 1989 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
    • Article

      The Leiognathus aureus complex (Perciformes: Leiognathidae) with the description of a new species 

      S Kimura, PV Dunlap, T Peristiwady & CR Lavilla-Pitogo - Ichthyological Research, 2003 - Ichthyological Society of Japan
      Taxonomic analysis of a group of morphologically similar ponyfishes (Perciformes: Leiognathidae) establishes a complex comprising three valid species: Leiognathus aureus Abe and Haneda, 1972, widely distributed in the western Pacific Ocean (Taiwan, Philippines, Thailand, Singapore, Indonesia, and northern Australia); L. hataii Abe and Haneda, 1972, currently known only from Ambon, Indonesia; and L. panayensis sp. nov. Kimura and Dunlap, currently known only from Panay Island, the Philippines. The L. aureus complex can be defined by the following combination of characters: mouth protruding forward, not downward; small but sharp conical teeth uniserially on jaws; a black line between lower margin of eye and lower jaw articulation; and lateral line incomplete, ending below posterior part of dorsal fin base or on anterior caudal peduncle. Leiognathus hataii differs from both L. aureus and L. panayensis in having a large dark blotch below the spinous dorsal fin base and fewer counts of scales (lateral line scales 50–58 vs. 64–85 in the latter two species; scales above lateral line 7–10 vs. 12–18; scales below lateral line 22–26 vs. 30–41). Leiognathus panayensis is distinguished from L. aureus in having a deeper body (41–51% SL vs. 35–45% SL in the latter), long posterior limb of maxilla (21–25% HL vs. 15–23% HL), wholly scaled belly (vs. naked along preanal median keel), and a dark blotch on nape (vs. absent).
    • Article

      Molecular epidemiology of koi herpesvirus 

      J Kurita, K Yuasa, T Ito, M Sano, RP Hedrick, MY Engelsma, OLM Haenen, A Sunarto, EB Kholidin, HY Chou, MC Tung, L de la Peña, G Lio-Po, C Tu, K Way & T Iida - Fish Pathology, 2009 - Japanese Society of Fish Pathology
      Three regions of koi herpesvirus (KHV) genomic DNA were compared for 34 samples from Japan, six from Indonesia, two from Taiwan, one from the Philippines, 13 from the Netherlands, one from the UK, one from the USA and one from Israel. The analyzed genomic regions included known PCR-detection targets (SphI-5, 9/5 and the thymidine kinase gene). The KHVs from Asian countries were very homogeneous, although two variants were noted based on a single nucleotide polymorphism. In contrast, seven variants were found in KHVs from outside of Asia, and although closely related to one another, they were clearly distinct from those from Asian. The results suggest that a clear genetic distinction exists between Asian and European (including each single isolate from the USA and Israel) types of KHV, and that unique types of KHV were independently introduced or emerged in the respective geographic locations.
    • magazineArticle

      Overview of the marine fish hatchery industry in Taiwan 

      JN Nocillado & IC Liao - SEAFDEC Asian Aquaculture, 2001 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
      Although fish culture itself is an age-old tradition in Taiwan, it was in the 1960s that the first successes on artificial propagation were achieved, with several species of Chinese carps and tilapias. The first marine fish to be bred in captivity was the grey mullet; it was first induced to spawn in 1968. Various other species have since been added to the list of propagated marine fish. The characteristics of the marine fish hatchery industry in Taiwan are outlined, considering both the outdoor pond and indoor tank systems. Future prospects are very good; Taiwan now exports marine fish larvae and fingerlings to many of its Asian neighbours and there are some 60 marine fish species for which commercial larval production is possible.