Now showing items 1-6 of 6

    • Conference paper

      Assessment of local government's implementation of open access policy in Taal Lake, Philippines: Effects on lake conservation and management. 

      MT Mercene-Mutia - 2001 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center; Philippine Council for Aquatic and Marine Research and Development; Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources
      The effects of local government's implementation of the current national policy on open access in municipal fisheries are assessed in terms of their impact on the fishery resources of Taal Lake. Local officials and fisherfolk were interviewed and their responses were analyzed for trends in perceptions on how local open access policies affect fishing practices and productivity in the lake. A policy matrix containing certain areas of concern of local governments related to sound decisionmaking on lake fishery was designed.

      The study shows that local government implementation of open access policy in Taal Lake tends to have negative effects on the lake's fisheries. Open access allows for the unregulated entry of fishing practices like fish cage culture which tend to increase the pollution load in the lake. Pollution due to fish farming in cages seems to even exceed loads from domestic wastes and agricultural runoff. While fish cages flourished in the lake, the income of small fisher folk has declined because of dwindling catch from capture fisheries.

      It is recommended that national government agencies (e.g., Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources, Department of Environment and Natural Resources) should forge an agreement with local government units for a continuing assessment of the fishery resources in Taal. This needs to be coupled with technical assistance to undertake sustained efforts to improve the conservation, productivity and management of the lake's aquatic resources. There is also a need to increase the budgetary allocations for new research and extension activities to address problems and issues of the fishery sector in the lake and for upgrading the capability of local and sectoral policy and decision makers on the lake's fisheries.
    • Conference paper

      Lake Lanao: Its past and present status 

      RP Rosagaron - 2001 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center; Philippine Council for Aquatic and Marine Research and Development; Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources
      Geographically located in Central Mindanao, Lake Lanao is the second largest lake in the Philippines. The lake is famous locally for its various uses and internationally for its endemic cyprinids. This paper intends to inform the local leaders and the national planners about Lake Lanao's dwindling fisheries resources, the extinction of some endemic cyprinids, and the current interventions as well as suggested action plans to increase fish production and to conserve the remaining species in the lake. The past and present studies on the lake are also reviewed. Early and latest statistics on the lake's fisheries production are presented to invite the interest of all sectors in coming up with the integrated approach to protect, conserve and increase its fisheries production. Local and national interventions to conserve and increase fisheries production are discussed. These include the setting up of BFAR Fisheries Station in Kialdan, Marantao; the establishment of a fish hatchery in Poona, Marantao by Southern Philippines Development Authority; the formation of Save Lake Lanao Movement by the local leaders; the creation of Lake Lanao Research and Development Council; the current concern of Philippine Council for Aquatic and Marine Research and Development-DOST; and the extension and research and development thrusts of the Mindanao State University, College of Fisheries in Marawi City.
    • Conference paper

      Managing 'sinirapan' Mistichthys luzonensis Smith in Lake Buhi, Camarines Sur: Insights from its biology and population dynamics. 

      VS Soliman & MFHA Sergio - 2001 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center; Philippine Council for Aquatic and Marine Research and Development; Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources
      The population dynamics and related aspects of the biology of 'sinarapan' Mistichthys luzonensis Smith, the world's smallest commercial fish, are used as basis in formulating management strategies for this goby in Lake Buhi, Camarines Sur. Mesh size limit (4.1mm) and catch limit, estimated through length-based analytic fishery methods, are proposed. Yield-per-recruit analysis using length-frequency data for 11 months provided the quantitative indices used in estimating fishing limits. Closed season for 'sinarapan' was established from temporal pattern of recruitment and the reproductive biology of the species. Much of the data on 'sinarapan' came from studies in Lake Manapao. To improve the recruitment success of 'sinarapan', a habitat enhancement scheme in Lake Buhi is hereby recommended.
    • Conference paper

      SEAFDEC contribution to the ecological awareness of Philippine Lakes 

      RR Platon - In National Seminar-Workshop on the Conservation and Ecological Management of Philippine Lakes in Relation to Fisheries and Aquaculture (1997 : Innotech, Diliman, Quezon City), 2001 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center; Philippine Council for Aquatic and Marine Research and Development; Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources
      Since 1976 the Aquaculture Department of the Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center (SEAFDEC/AQD), through its Binangonan Freshwater Station has been continuously involved in research on various aspects of inland waters, with emphasis on Laguna de Bay. Lakes Paoay, Taal, Sampaloc and Naujan have also been studied to a limited extent. Research efforts focused on monitoring activities of various biological and physico-chemical parameters in the lake; pollution studies; improvement of practices towards an environmentally sound and sustainable aquaculture enterprise; socio-economic impacts of aquaculture on lakeshore communities and other related activities. The Department has been actively collaborating with various national and international agencies as well as non-government organizations in its effort, to improve its research capabilities. The research results have been published in both local and international scientific journals and proceedings.
    • Conference paper

      Stock assessment of commercially important fishes in Naujan Lake. 

      RA Pasumbal & CT Perez - 2001 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center; Philippine Council for Aquatic and Marine Research and Development; Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources
      The study aimed to assess the capture fisheries of Naujan Lake with emphasis on commercially important fish species and to determine the extent of their exploitation.

      Four major fish landing centers in the municipalities of Socorro, Pola, Victoria and Naujan were surveyed from May 1995 to December 1996. Eight types of fishing gear had been recorded. The most commonly used was gill net or 'pante', followed by fish pot 'bubo', fish corral 'baklad', spear 'salapang', spear gun 'pana', fish trap 'patanga', encircling net 'takilis' and long line 'kitay'.

      Tilapia comprised 61% of the total fish production of the lake, followed by therapon (16%), goby (4%) and mudfish (2%). The other species caught were 'pla salid', catfish, mullet, carp, milkfish and shrimp, which contributed 17% to the total production. Migratory fishes like the mullet and milkfish, on the other hand, showed a declining trend in production.
    • Conference paper

      Translocation of the clupeid Sardinella tawilis to another lake in the Philippines: A proposal and ecological considerations. 

      AC Mamaril - 2001 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center; Philippine Council for Aquatic and Marine Research and Development; Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources
      The dwindling commercial catch of Sardinella tawilis (Clupeidae), locally known as 'tawilis', reported in recent years by local fisher folk in Lake Taal, Batangas, Philippines, could be a result of the interaction of factors such as over fishing, destructive fish-capture techniques, changes in water quality, and others. Like the rest of the handful of endemic freshwater fish species in the Philippines, S. tawilis is threatened with depletion of its stocks, if not with extinction in the near future. A conservation strategy that could be considered is the translocation of 'tawilis' to another lake in the Philippines, whose ecological features closely resemble those of Lake Taal and where 'tawilis' would receive socio-economic and cultural acceptability. Cases of clupeid introductions - natural and man-made, successes and failures - are presented from published literature. Special attention is given to the case of a well-planned trans-country (Thailand-to-Indonesia) attempt to introduce a clupeid fish. The broader questions of biodiversity, endemicity, conservation, and fish community structure in Lake Taal (and elsewhere) must be underpinned by sound basic taxonomy and ecology.