Now showing items 1-9 of 9

    • Article

      Abdominal segment deformity syndrome (asds) and fused body segment deformity (fbsd) in cultured Penaeus indicus 

      The abdominal segment deformity disease (ASDD) is a new shrimp disease reported only in cultured Penaeus vannamei in Thailand. Shrimp with ASDD have deformed abdominal segment, jagged gut line and bumpy surfaces. Similar signs were observed in cultured P. indicus in the Philippines. However, aside from the signs described for ASDD, some P. indicus showing abdominal segment deformity syndrome (ASDS) had more severe deformities up to the extent that the number of body segments was reduced due to fusion. Shrimp with fused body segment deformity (FBSD) had four instead of five pairs of legs. To account the prevalence of the deformities in P. indicus, shrimp were classified into grossly normal shrimp (NS), shrimp with abdominal segment deformity syndrome (ASDS) and shrimp with fused segments (FBSD). Out of the shrimp sampled, 83.4 ± 5.4% was NS, 10.9 ± 6.2% was ASDS and 5.7 ± 3.0% was FBSD. Morphometric characteristics of the shrimp were measured. There was no significant difference in body weight (BW) among male and female NS, ASDS and FBSD. In both sexes, total length (TL) of FBSD was significantly shorter compared to NS and ASDS. Shrimp samples were also screened to be negative for known infectious viral diseases including white spot syndrome virus (WSSV), infectious hypodermal and haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHHNV), infectious myonecrosis virus (IMNV), P. vannamei nodavirus (PvNV), Macrobrachium rosenbergii nodavirus (MrNV) and Taura syndrome virus (TSV). Occurrence of ASDS and FBSD in post-larvae (PL) produced from captive and wild spawners were also determined. Based on a tank experiment, no significant difference was detected between the percentages of ASDS in PL produced from wild or captive spawners but FBSD was only noted in PL produced from the latter. Deformities generally did not affect the size of P. indicus except for the reduced length of shrimp with FBSD which when coupled with missing pleopods could lead to major economic loss for shrimp farmers if not addressed properly.
    • Conference paper

      Broodstock management and seed production of the rabbitfish Siganus guttatus (Bloch) and the sea bass Lates calcarifer (Bloch) 

      MN Duray & JV Juario - In JV Juario & LV Benitez (Eds.), Seminar on Aquaculture Development in Southeast Asia, 8-12 September 1987, Iloilo City, Philippines, 1988 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
      This paper reviews results of studies conducted on the rabbitfish, Siganus guttatus (Bloch) and the sea bass Lates calcarifer (Bloch) at the Aquaculture Department of the Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center. Studies include broodstock development and management, induced breeding, effect of handling stress and diet on egg quality, early life history, food, feeding strategy, weaning to artificial diets, effect of stocking density and salinity on egg development, larval growth and survival, and advancement of metamorphosis in sea bass by using thyroxine.

      A seed production technique had been developed for rabbitfish with survival rates ranging from 5-35% while the seed production technique for sea bass developed in Thailand had been modified to suit local conditions. Based on results from recent morphological and physiological studies, the stocking density, water management, and feeding scheme for the production of rabbitfish and sea bass fry had been modified to reduce cannibalism and improve survival.
    • Article

      Feeding, growth and survival of abalone (Haliotis asinina Linnaeus 1758) reared at different stocking densities in suspended mesh cages in flow-through tanks 

      AC Fermin & SM Buen - The Philippine Scientist, 2000 - San Carlos Publications, University of San Carlos
      Feeding, growth and survival of hatchery-bred juvenile abalone, Haliotis asinina (mean initial shell lengths: 32 mm) stocked at 25, 50 and 100 m-2 of shelter surface area in mesh cages suspended in indoor tanks were determined. Animals were fed the seaweed, Gracilariopsis bailinae, to excess given at weekly intervals. After 250 d, avereage daily growth rate (mean: 122 µm d-1 shell length, 156 mg d-1 body weight) was highest in abalone reared at the lowest stocking density (25 m-2 ). Abalone stocked at 50 and 100 m-2 had similar growth rates that ranged from 96 to 98 µm d-1 SL and 123 to 131 mg d-1 BW). Daily feeding rates of 29 and 30% were not significantly different for abalone stocked at 25 and 50 m-2, respectively, but were higher than abalone stocked at 100 m-2. The higher feeding rates of 24-28% day-1 of abalone in all treatments starting day-129 until day-160 could be due to the onset of sexual maturation as most abalone are already mature at this size. Survival rates were generally high (91-98%) and were not significantly different among treatments. However, body size (range: 59.3 mm SL, 57-58.4 g BW) at harvest was bigger in animal stocked at 25 m-2 than those stocked at 100 m-2. Sexual maturation during culture did not hamper growth of abalone. G. bailinae proved to be a sufficient food source for abalone grow-out. A stocking density between 50-100 m-2 is recommended for tank grow-out of H. asinina.
    • Article

      Growth and agar quality of Gracilaria heteroclada (Zhang et Xia) grown in a filter tank 

      MRJ Luhan, F Harder & AQ Hurtado - Philippine Agricultural Scientist, 2006 - College of Agriculture, University of the Philippines Los Baños
      Gracilaria heteroclada Zhang et Xia was grown in filter tanks to determine the growth, agar quality and uptake pattern of nitrogen and to observe the water quality in recirculating water system with seaweed.

      Rapid uptake of nitrogen in G. heteroclada was observed within the first 24th of culture. Filling up of the nitrogen pools in the cell may have continued until the fifth day, the plants started to increase in weight, proportionate to the uptake rate of nitrogen duing the experiment. G. heteroclada stocked at 1 kg m-2achieved a specific growth rate (SGR) of approximately 10.4% d-1 during 15d of culture, at total ammonia-nitrogen and nitrite-nitrogen levels of 0.03-0.27 mg L-1 and 0.04-0.19mg L-1, respectively, in the filter tank. Approximately 11% of nitrogen in the water was removed by the seaweed.
    • Article

      Growth response of cultured larvae of silver therapon Leiopotherapon plumbeus (Kner, 1864) in outdoor tanks in relation to fertilizer type and fish density 

      FA Aya & LMB Garcia - Journal of Applied Ichthyology, 2016 - Wiley
      This study evaluated the effects of fertilizer type and fish density on early growth and survival of silver therapon Leiopotherapon plumbeus (Kner, 1864) larvae reared in outdoor tanks. In the first experiment, larvae (1.92 ± 0.09 mm total length) were stocked into nine, 4 m3 tanks at an initial density of 0.5 larvae L-1 and reared for 42 days at an ambient temperature of 28.8–30.7°C. Three treatments with three replicates each were compared: organic (chicken manure, OF) or inorganic fertilizers (ammonium phosphate, IF) applied once every 2 weeks, and the unfertilized (NF) tanks serving as the control group. Water quality, zooplankton densities, survival or growth of L. plumbeus larvae did not vary significantly in either fertilized or unfertilized tanks. Fertilization resulted in elevated nutrient concentrations, which did affect survival (2.10%–6.07%) of the fish larvae. In the second experiment, larvae were stocked at densities of 0.4 or 0.6 larvae L-1 in tanks fertilized at 4–5 days interval with OF and IF for 30 days. Growth performance of L. plumbeus larvae was affected by fish density, with significantly larger (20.04 ± 2.65 mm in total length) and higher specific growth rate (SGR; 6.97 ± 0.48% day-1) at 0.4 larvae L-1 than at 0.6 L-1. Fry production did not vary significantly between fish density treatment groups given the same fertilizer types, but survival rates were improved at 0.4 L-1. Together, production of L. plumbeus larvae in outdoor tanks can be optimized at a lower stocking density, regardless of the type of fertilizer used.
    • Article

      Larval and early juvenile development of silver therapon, Leiopotherapon plumbeus (Actinopterygii: Perciformes: Terapontidae), reared in mesocosms 

      FA Aya, MNC Corpuz, MA Laron & LMB Garcia - Acta Ichthyologica et Piscatoria, 2017 - Szczecińskie Towarzystwo Naukowe
      The silver therapon, Leiopotherapon plumbeus (Kner, 1864), is an endemic and economically important freshwater food fish in the Philippines. The natural populations of this species have been declining during the past years, mainly due to intense fishing pressure, habitat degradation, and introduction of invasive alien species. At present, it is considered a target species for domestication and conservation efforts. Despite several attempts of artificial reproduction and larval rearing, little is known on larval and early juvenile development of silver therapon. The presently reported study was therefore intended to fill this gap in the knowledge by determining the growth and describing body proportions, pigmentation, and fin formation of this fish. Newly hatched larvae were reared in mesocosm tanks at a mean temperature of 29.5°C. Larvae up to 30 days after hatching were sampled at irregular intervals and preserved in 5% buffered formalin. Early development stages for 245 preserved specimens were described in detail with reference to changes in morphology, growth and body proportions, pigmentation, and fin formation. Five developmental stages of silver therapon were identified: yolk sac larva (1.88 mm TL), preflexion (2.51 mm TL), notochord flexion (4.50-8.27 mm TL), postflexion larva (6.90-12.21 mm TL), and early juvenile (>13.40 mm TL). Growth was isometric for eye diameter and gape size whereas positive allometry was observed for body depth, head length, and preanal length. Some body proportions showed abrupt changes from preflexion to postflexion larvae before it stabilized during the early juvenile stage. Pigmentation in the form of stellate and punctate melanophores increased with developmental stage, with larvae becoming heavily pigmented from postflexion to early juvenile stage. These morphological changes, together with the full complement of fin rays and squamation observed in specimens larger than 13.4 mm TL, suggest the attainment of the juvenile stage of this species. These morphological changes may explain the food and feeding habits during the early life stages of silver therapon which is critical to their survival and recruitment in the wild and in a mesocosm hatchery environment.
    • Article

      Morphological deformities in mud crab Scylla serrata juveniles exposed to antibiotics during the larval stage 

      GS Pates Jr., ET Quinitio & FD Parado-Estepa - Aquaculture Research, 2017 - Wiley
      The effects of antibiotics on the external deformities, growth and survival of mud crab Scylla serrata larvae and juveniles were determined. Zoeae were exposed to oxytetracycline (OTC) (0, 3.0, 6.0, 9.0, 12 mg L-1) and furazolidone (FZD) (0, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0 mg L-1) in the first and second experiments, respectively, until the late megalopa. The crab instars were grown in nursery tanks for 1 month. Larvae survived until megalopa only at 3.0 and 6.0 mg L-1 OTC or 0.5 and 1.0 mg L-1 FZD. These four concentrations were run simultaneously in another experiment. Morphological deformities in zoea 5 were bent dorsal, rostral and furcal spines. There was no significant difference (P > 0.05) on the deformities of zoea 5 in 3.0 and 6.0 mg L-1 OTC and 0.5 and 1.0 mg L-1 FZD. Significantly (P < 0.05) higher survival and faster growth were attained in 3.0 mg L-1 OTC and 0.5 mg L-1 FZD. Deformities observed in juveniles were fused frontal and lateral spines, asymmetrical and depressed tip of abdominal flap and gap between sternites. High percentage occurrence of deformities was observed in the 6.0 mg L-1 OTC and 1.0 mg L-1 FZD in the first and third experiments, respectively. There was no significant difference (P > 0.05) observed in the survival of juveniles in OTC and FZD treatments. However, growth was significantly (P < 0.05) faster in lower concentrations of the two antibiotics. The study shows the effects of OTC and FZD in the morphology of mud crab. Therefore, there is a need to eliminate the use of antibiotics and find alternatives.
    • Article

      Quality assessment of newly hatched mud crab, Scylla serrata, larvae 

      ET Quinitio, JJ dela Cruz-Huervana & FD Parado-Estepa - Aquaculture Research, 2018 - Wiley
      Starvation and exposure to formalin were investigated as possible stress tests for evaluating the quality of mud crab, Scylla serrata, larvae. For the starvation stress test, newly hatched zoeae stocked in 150-ml containers were either starved or fed rotifers. Similarly, newly hatched zoeae were stocked in containers with seawater of 0 (control), 20, 30 and 40 mg/L formalin for the formalin stress test. The zoeae from the same batches were used for seed production to monitor their performance and validate the results of stress tests. Starvation was found to be unsuitable for larval quality evaluation. However, the impact of initial food deprivation on the newly hatched larvae indicates that feeding immediately after hatching is necessary for mud crab larvae. Exposure of larvae to 40 mg/L formalin for 3 hr appeared to be a reliable and practical method for larval quality assessment as the survival of larvae in the mass production tanks validated the classification of good and poor quality batches in the stress tests. On this basis, a hatchery operator can decide which batch should be cultured further. Finally, there appears to be a link between the quality of larvae and the performance at the megalopa and early juvenile crabs.
    • magazineArticle

      Sea bass: The profitable alternative 

      Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center, Aquaculture Department - Aqua Farm News, 1991 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center