Now showing items 1653-1672 of 3209

    • magazineArticle

      The Jamandre bangus hatchery 

      NJ Dagoon - SEAFDEC Asian Aquaculture, 2000 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
    • Conference paper

      Japan: mangrove areas and their utilization 

      M Minagawa - In JH Primavera, LMB Garcia, MT Castaños & MB Surtida (Eds.), Mangrove-Friendly Aquaculture : Proceedings of the Workshop on Mangrove-Friendly Aquaculture organized by the SEAFDEC Aquaculture Department, January 11-15, 1999, Iloilo City, Philippines, 2000 - Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center, Aquaculture Department
      Although Japan has large-scale aquaculture, there is no aquaculture development in mangrove areas because the total area is small (553 ha) and strictly protected. Mangroves are preserved in comparatively good condition. Future development of aquaculture in mangrove areas is considered small-scale. Rather than aquaculture, Japan practices enhancement and management of wild fisheries. Tourism is another industry that would have an important role in mangrove utilization. But basic research on mangrove ecosystems is essential prior to determining policies for utilization of mangrove areas. International cooperative research work is important to encourage mangrove-friendly aquaculture and protect the environment.
    • magazineArticle

      Kaleidoscope of the prawn industry 

      Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center, Aquaculture Department - Aqua Farm News, 1989 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
    • Conference paper

      Kappaphycus and Gracilariopsis meal as binders for diets of tiger shrimp 

      V Peñaflorida & N Golez - 1996 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
      Two locally grown seaweeds, Kappaphycus alvarezii and Gracilaria heteroclada, were tested as binders in diets for shrimp juveniles to minimize the use of wheat flour, a common binder. The seaweeds were washed, dried, ground, and made into paste. Seaweed meals were added to an isonitrogenous diet containing 5% flour at 5, 10 and 15%. The control diet contained 15% flour (no seaweed meal). The diets were fed to juvenile Penaeus monodon for 56 days to assess the acceptability of the seaweed meals in terms of shrimp growth, survival and feed conversion ratio (FCR). Seven dietary treatments, each with three replicates, were arranged in a completely randomized design. Treatment means were compared by analysis of variance and Duncan's multiple range test.Growth of shrimp fed diets with 5% and 10% G. heteroclada, and 10% K. alvarezii did not differ significantly but was higher than the rest of the treatments. Only those fed 10% G. heteroclada had growth similar to those fed the control diet. Diets with 5% and 10% K. alvareziii and 10% G. heteroclada had the best FCR. Shrimp survival decreased as the level of G. heteroclada increased. Survival was not affected by the level of K. alvarezii in the diet.Water stability of the diets was assessed in 4 h. High water stability was observed in the diet with 10% G. heteroclada (91%), 5% G. heteroclada (90%) and the control (90%). The rest of the diets were 87-89% stable. Thus, 10% G. heteroclada or 10% K. alvarezii could be used to supplement 5% flour as binders in shrimp diets with no adverse effect on growth and survival.
    • Conference paper

      Kappaphycus farming: Farmer's experience 

      Hadja Saada T. Omar - 2002 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
    • Conference paper

      Key issues and knowledge gaps on aquaculture that need to be addressed in the next decade 

      BO Acosta, RM Coloso, EGT de Jesus-Ayson & JD Toledo (Eds.) - In BO Acosta, RM Coloso, EGT de Jesus-Ayson & JD Toledo (Eds.), Sustainable aquaculture development for food security in Southeast Asia towards 2020. Proceedings of the Regional Technical Consultation on Sustainable Aquaculture Development in Southeast Asia Towards 2020, 2011 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
      This section gives the summary and conclusions (background, issues and recommendations) of the plenary presentations, panel discussions and open fora on the four themes: (1) meeting social and economic challenges, (2) quality seed production for sustainable aquaculture, (3) healthy and wholesome aquaculture and, (4) protecting the environment and adapting to climate change.
    • magazineArticle

      Knowing Asian aquaculture and fisheries 

      MB Surtida - SEAFDEC Asian Aquaculture, 1998 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
    • magazineArticle

      Knowing Asian aquaculture and fisheries 

      MB Surtida - SEAFDEC Asian Aquaculture, 1998 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
      An outline is given of aquaculture practices in Malaysia, Philippines and Thailand, which included freshwater, brackishwater and marine systems.
    • magazineArticle

      Knowing Asian aquaculture and fisheries 

      MB Surtida - SEAFDEC Asian Aquaculture, 1998 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
    • magazineArticle

      Knowing Asian aquaculture and fisheries. Part 1 

      MB Surtida - SEAFDEC Asian Aquaculture, 1998 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
      An outline is given of aquaculture and fisheries in Asia, providing information of use to students whose work can influence laws, rules, policy and regulations on aquaculture and fisheries, with the view in mind to sustainable aquaculture. In this issue, the following countries are examined: China, Indonesia, and Bangladesh.
    • Article

      Knowledge, gender, and resources in small-scale fishing: The case of Honda Bay, Palawan, Philippines 

      SV Siar - Environmental Management, 2003 - Springer Verlag
      The coastal zone is a place of intense activity where resources, users, and resource-use practices interact. This case study of small-scale fisheries in Honda Bay, Palawan, Philippines shows that resources, space, and gender are intertwined. The study was conducted between June 1997 and July 1998. The data were gathered using free listing, pile sort, ranking, resource mapping, and key informant interviews. The results showed that women's knowledge about fishery resources and their fishing activities are associated with the intertidal zone whereas men's knowledge is associated with coral reefs. In classifying fishery resources, appearance is the main consideration for women whereas a combination of appearance, habitat, and type of fishing gear is the consideration used by men. Market price is very important because of its dependence on the demand of the export market as well as the local market. Women dominate the buying of fishery products. Many women market their husband's catch, process fish, or gather shells and sea cucumber for sale. Among the fishing households, type of fishing gear provides an indication of socioeconomic standing. This paper concludes that access to resources is shaped by gender and age. The differences in resource knowledge possessed by men and women lead to differential access to fishery resources. In addition, the differences in socioeconomic status also influence resource access. The socialization of children into fishing reinforces the gender division of labor and space in the coastal zone.
    • Koi herpesvirus-associated mortalities in quarantined koi carp in the Philippines 

      JR Somga, LD de la Peña, CD Sombito, MG Paner, VS Suarnaba, GC Capulos, PI Santa Maria & GL Po - Bulletin of the European Association of Fish Pathologists, 2010 - European Association of Fish Pathologists
      Illegally imported koi carp were confiscated at the Ninoy Aquino International Airport (NAIA), Manila, Philippines by the Fisheries Quarantine and Inspection Service Officers of the Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources (BFAR). The confiscated fish were turned over to the BFAR Fish Health Laboratory where they were held for observation at a water temperature of 28 degree C. After 5 days, some fish were showing abnormal swimming behavior and some had died. The most prominent disease signs in the freshly dead and moribund fish were body ulcerations and pale gills showing white necrotic patches, consistent with the clinical signs of KHV infection. Gills were dissected and fixed in 95% ethanol. All of the samples tested positive for KHV in a 1-step PCR assay.

      This paper reports the first case of KHV associated mortalities in illegally important koi carp confiscated by the Fisheries Quarantine and Inspection Service Officers of BFAR. This highlights the importance of the quarantine and inspection service s role in preventing the illegal entry of fish into the country and the introduction of exotic aquatic diseases.
    • Article

      L-ascorbyl-2-phosphate Mg as source of vitamin C for juvenile Penaeus monodon 

      MR Catacutan & CR Lavilla-Pitogo - The Israeli Journal of Aquaculture-Bamidgeh, 1994 - Society of Israeli Aquaculture and Marine Biotechnology
      Phosphated ascorbic acid (MAP), a stable vitamin C derivative, was used in practical diets for Penaeus monodon (wet weight, 126-254 mg) as a source of vitamin C. In Experiment I, the levels were from 0 to 1,500 ppm MAP. No significant differences in weight gain, SGR, survival and FCR were observed among treatment means after 92 days of feeding but the lowest values were obtained in the group fed without the MAP dietary supplement. At the start of the experiment shrimps were infected with monodon baculovirus (MBV). However, the histological structure of the hepatopancreas showed improvement in animals fed diets containing 100 ppm MAP and above, after 92 days.

      In Experiment II, shrimps were given different MAP levels (0 to 8,000 ppm) for 81 days. The FCR and survival of shrimps in MAP supplemented diets were significantly higher than those without MAP. In both experiments, shrimps without dietary MAP were weak and developed blackened subcuticular tissues, a symptom of vitamin C deficiency. MAP was utilized by P. monodon as a source of vitamin C. An adequate level in a practical diet would be 100 to 200 ppm MAP, equivalent to 50 to 100 ppm ascorbic acid.
    • Conference paper

      L-ascorbyl-2-phosphate Mg as vitamin C source for juvenile Penaeus monodon 

      M Catacutan & C Lavilla-Pitogo - 1996 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
      Phosphated ascorbic acid (magnesium L-ascorbyl-2-phosphate or MAP) is a stable form of vitamin C. The suitability and growth requirement level of this derivative in practical diet was determined for juvenile Penaeus monodon. The stability and shelf-life of this derivative was compared with that of crystalline ascorbic acid in prepared shrimp diets. Leaching test was conducted at time intervals of 0 to 6 hours while storage test was conducted for 2 weeks to 3 months.In Experiment I, shrimps (183-254 mg) were given MAP at 0 to 1,500 mg/kg diet for 92 days. Shrimps given the diet without MAP supplement had the lowest growth, survival and feed conversion efficiency, but these were not significantly different from those of shrimps fed diets containing different MAP levels. The shrimps were infected with monodon baculovirus at the start of the experiment. At termination, the histological structure of the hepatopancreas showed improvement in those fed diets containing MAP at 100 mg/kg diet or higher.In Experiment II, shrimps (126-135 mg) were fed with diets containing MAP at 0-8,000 mg/kg diet. Seaweed was removed from the diet composition. After 81 days, shrimps given diet without MAP had significantly lower survival rate and feed conversion efficiency than the shrimps fed diets with MAP. Growth was lowest in shrimps without MAP but was not significantly different from that of shrimps given MAP. After feeding for 81 days on diets with different MAP levels, the shrimps were wounded and further maintained with their respective dietary treatments to observe the effects of MAP in wound healing. Complete healing of wounds were observed after two weeks among shrimps given with MAP at 100 and 200 mg/kg diet. In both experiments, shrimps without dietary MAP were weak and showed symptoms of vitamin C deficiency. Higher levels of MAP did not result in very high mortalities in shrimps. This study showed that MAP was utilized by P. monodon as a vitamin C source and the adequate level would be about 100 to 200 mg/kg of diet or 50 to 100 mg as ascorbic acid per kg diet.
    • Article

      Laboratory breeding of the mud crab Scylla serrata (Forskal) through the zoea and megalopa stages to the crab stage 

      H Motoh, D de la Peña & E Tampos - SEAFDEC Aquaculture Department Quarterly Research Report, 1977 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
      A series of experiments is being conducted to establish breeding techniques to mass-produce seedlings of S. serrata for pond cultivation to meet the commercial demand for the crab. The objective is to culture the crab through the 5 zoea stages and 1 megalopa stage to the crab stage. A brief resume of the experiments is presented. Heavy mortality occurred at the 1st, 2nd and 5th zoea stages, and during the megalopa stage. Initial mortality is attributed to unfavourable rearing conditions, and later mortality to cannibalism.
    • Article

      Laboratory manipulation of Gracilariopsis bailinae Zhang et Xia (Gracilariales, Rhodophyta) 

      SF Rabanal, R Azanza & A Hurtado-Ponce - Botanica Marina, 1997 - Walter de Gruyter
      Carpospore germination, carposporeling development and tetraspore formation were investigated in Gracilariopsis bailinae Zhang et Xia by manipulating photoperiod, photon flux density, temperature, salinity and nutrients. Laboratory-generated sporelings attained mean growth rate from 4.05 to 10.31% d-1 during the first week of incubation. Duncan s multiple range test (DMRT) showed that growth rates were significantly different (P < 0.05) between the treatment combinations and between weekly intervals. The optimal condition for growth of sporelings, irrespective of culture age, was attained at treatment combinations of 26°C, 11:13 (h. L:D) photoperiod, 100 µEm-2s-1 photon flux density (PFD), 25 µM NH4Cl: 2.5 µM K2HPO4 and 25ppt salinity followed by a treatment combination of 26°C, 11:13 (h. L:D) photoperiod, 100 µEm-2s-1 photon flux density (PFD), 50 µM NH4Cl: 5 µM K2HPO4 and 25 ppt salinity. For the first time in this species, tetraspore formation was induced in the laboratory. The tetrasporophyte produced many tetraspores in almost all branches of the thallus grown at 26°C, 11:13 (h. L:D) photoperiod, 100 µEm-2 s-1, 25 µM NH4Cl: 2.5 µM K2HPO4 and at 30 ppt salinity while those grown at lower light, higher nutrient level and higher salinity had fewer tetraspores. No tetraspores were formed at a higher temperature (30°C), longer photoperiod (13:11 h. L:D), and at 25 ppt salinity and the plants remained vegetative from 4 to 7 months. Logistic regression analysis showed that tetrasporangial induction was significantly affected by nutrients and salinity (P < 0.05).
    • Book

      Laboratory manual of standardized methods for antimicrobial sensitivity tests for bacteria isolated from aquatic animals and environment 

      L Ruangpan & EA Tendencia - 2004 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center.
      The manual is one of the important outputs of a collection of studies related to antibiotic usage in order to come up with guidelines for its prudent usage. It offers a complete guide for testing bacterial susceptibility and resistance through the use of simple techniques for disk agar diffusion tests, and a guide to do a more thorough study to test therapeutic levels using microbial inhibitory concentration.
    • Book

      Laboratory manual of standardized methods for the analysis of pesticide and antibiotic residue in aquaculture products 

      IG Borlongan & JNP Chuan - 2004 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
      The manual contains guidelines on the detection of antibiotic and pesticide residues in aquaculture products. Different methods for the analysis of the two chemicals are discussed. The manual is expected to benefit all those who are involved in the monitoring and enforcement aspects of chemical residue limits in aquaculture products in the region.
    • Article

      Lactate dehydrogenase isozyme patterns during the development of milkfish, (Chanos chanos (Forskal)) 

      PD Requintina, LM Engle & LV Benitez - Kalikasan, The Philippine Journal of Biology, 1981 - University of the Philippines at Los Baños
      Polyacrylamide disc gel electrophoresis was done to determine the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) isozyme patterns for fry (5-3 mg), fingerling (6-12 g), pond-size (150-250 g) and adult (6-9 kg) milkfish. The patterns were tissue specific; the different tissues examined, viz., eye, liver, heart, and skeletal muscle had different expressions of LDH isozymes. The resolved patterns appeared to be products of LDH gene loci A, B, and C. Subunits A and B were present in all tissues. A4 and B4 were predominant in skeletal and heart muscle, respectively; the two associated non-randomly in vivo and formed only the heteropolymers A3B and AB3. A liver band, L4, was most conspicuous in the fingerling, pond-size, and adult; it was assumed to be coded by locus C. A negatively charged band, X4, was detected in fully developed ovary and in fry homogenized as whole individuals, but it could not be resolved in tissues of fingerling.

      Six-mo old stunts and 3-mo old fingerlings had similar LDH patterns for all tissues examined. The patterns for 11-mo old stunts and fingerlings also were similar but the one for the eye of the former was the same pattern resolved for the eye of adults.

      There was no change in the LDH isozyme patterns of milk fish stunted for 6 mo under different salinity levels (0-5, 15-20, 32-35 ppt).
    • magazineArticle

      Laguna de Bay and LLDA 

      AS Frio - SEAFDEC Asian Aquaculture, 1999 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center