Now showing items 1-3 of 3

    • Article

      Domestication of the mud crab Scylla serrata 

      ET Quinitio, JJ de la Cruz, MRR Eguia, FD Parado-Estepa, GS Pates Jr. & CR Lavilla-Pitogo - Aquaculture International, 2011 - Springer Verlag
      The significant decrease in wild mud crab population highlights the need to manage the resources and domesticate crabs. This paper presents the initial results of the domestication of mud crab Scylla serrata aimed at producing good-quality captive broodstock. The analysis of the genetic structure of the base population was done as a prerequisite for domestication. Adult S. serrata from the northern to southern parts of the Philippines (Cagayan, Camarines, Samar, and Surigao) were obtained for genetic diversity analysis and domestication. Analysis of molecular variance showed that differences in the genetic variability between the four populations were not significant. Moreover, no significant deviation from Hardy–Weinberg Equilibrium was observed in each sample population and even in pooled populations. Body weight was positively correlated with the carapace width. Second spawning occurred 41–46 days after the first spawning and 34 days from second to third spawning. However, there was a decrease in the number of zoea in repeat spawnings. Twenty-four first-generation (F1) families were produced from the four sites. The duration from spawning of the base population (P0) to attainment of broodstock size F1 was 10–14 months. Four second-generation (F2) families were produced after 11–12 months. Up to the F2, crabs tested negative for six viruses: white spot syndrome virus, infectious hypodermal and hematopoietic necrosis virus, gill-associated virus, yellow head virus, Taura syndrome virus, and infectious myonecrosis virus. The reproductive performance of P0 was comparable to the succeeding generations. Several families were obtained from one population in a year. However, due to the cannibalistic behavior of crabs, more space is required for the nursery and grow-out phase. The domestication of S. serrata is the first study done on any mud crab species in the Indo-west Pacific region. The initial results would serve as guide to understand and eliminate the barriers to mud crab domestication. The breeding technology developed from this study will support the production of good-quality seedstock for farming.
    • Article

      Morphological deformities in mud crab Scylla serrata juveniles exposed to antibiotics during the larval stage 

      GS Pates Jr., ET Quinitio & FD Parado-Estepa - Aquaculture Research, 2017 - Wiley
      The effects of antibiotics on the external deformities, growth and survival of mud crab Scylla serrata larvae and juveniles were determined. Zoeae were exposed to oxytetracycline (OTC) (0, 3.0, 6.0, 9.0, 12 mg L-1) and furazolidone (FZD) (0, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0 mg L-1) in the first and second experiments, respectively, until the late megalopa. The crab instars were grown in nursery tanks for 1 month. Larvae survived until megalopa only at 3.0 and 6.0 mg L-1 OTC or 0.5 and 1.0 mg L-1 FZD. These four concentrations were run simultaneously in another experiment. Morphological deformities in zoea 5 were bent dorsal, rostral and furcal spines. There was no significant difference (P > 0.05) on the deformities of zoea 5 in 3.0 and 6.0 mg L-1 OTC and 0.5 and 1.0 mg L-1 FZD. Significantly (P < 0.05) higher survival and faster growth were attained in 3.0 mg L-1 OTC and 0.5 mg L-1 FZD. Deformities observed in juveniles were fused frontal and lateral spines, asymmetrical and depressed tip of abdominal flap and gap between sternites. High percentage occurrence of deformities was observed in the 6.0 mg L-1 OTC and 1.0 mg L-1 FZD in the first and third experiments, respectively. There was no significant difference (P > 0.05) observed in the survival of juveniles in OTC and FZD treatments. However, growth was significantly (P < 0.05) faster in lower concentrations of the two antibiotics. The study shows the effects of OTC and FZD in the morphology of mud crab. Therefore, there is a need to eliminate the use of antibiotics and find alternatives.
    • Conference paper

      Morphological deformities in mud crab Scylla serrata juveniles exposed to antibiotics during the larval stage 

      GS Pates Jr., ET Quinitio, GF Quinitio & FD Parado-Estepa - In ET Quinitio, FD Parado-Estepa & RM Coloso (Eds.), Philippines : In the forefront of the mud crab industry development : proceedings of the 1st National Mud Crab Congress, 16-18 November 2015, Iloilo City, Philippines, 2017 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
      The effects of antibiotics on the survival, growth and external deformities of mud crab Scylla serrata larvae and juveniles were determined. Zoeae were exposed to 0, 3, 6, 9, 12 mgL-1 oxytetracycline (OTC) and 0, 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2 mgL-1 furazolidone (furan) until the late megalopa in the first and second experiments. The treatments that gave the best results in the first and second experiments were conducted simultaneously in the third experiment. The surviving crab instar from each replicate were grown in nursery tanks for one month.

      Significantly higher survival and faster growth rate of Z5 were attained when 3 and 6 mgL-1 OTC or 0.5 and 1 mgL-1 furan were used. Morphological deformities observed in zoea 5 were bent dorsal, rostral and furcal spines. Percentage occurrence of morphological deformities was similar in all treatments. Significantly (P<0.05) higher survival and faster growth were attained among Z5 in the treatments using 3 mgL-1 OTC and 0.5 mL-1 furan in the third experiment. Morphological deformities observed in juveniles were fused frontal and lateral spines, asymmetrical and depressed tip of abdominal flap and gap between sternites. High percentage of deformities was observed in juveniles that were previously exposed to 6 mgL-1 OTC or 1.0 mgL-1 furan. There was no significant difference (P>0.05) observed in the survival of juveniles in both treatments of OTC and furan. However, growth was significantly (P<0.05) faster in lower concentrations of the two antibiotics.

      The study shows the apparent negative effects of antibiotics and highlights the need to eliminate or find alternatives, thereby preventing possible harm to the organisms and the environment.