Now showing items 1-6 of 6

    • Book chapter

      Biology and ecology 

      NB Solis - In Biology and culture of Penaeus monodon, 1988 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
      A review is made of current information on Penaeus monodon covering various aspects, including taxonomy, morphology, distribution, bionomics and life history. Reproduction, embryonic development, larval stages, spawning, food and feeding, and physiology are described and applications of such information to culture of the species are considered.
    • Book chapter

      Collection of the mud crab Scylla serrata var paramamosain in Tinagong Dagat and Sapian Bay, northern Panay 

      NB Solis - In T Bagarinao (Ed.), Research Output of the Fisheries Sector Program, 2007 - Bureau of Agricultural Research, Department of Agriculture
      Mud crabs were collected by baited traps from the mangroves and estuaries of Tinagong Dagat Bay and Sapian Bay in Capiz, northern Panay monthly over 18 months. Scylla serrata var paramamosain made up 95.4% of the collection and Scylla oceanica, 4.6%. Mean catch rates of S. serrata from Tinagong Dagat was 0.4 crabs/trap in the mangroves and 0.5 crabs/trap in the estuary; in Sapian Bay, 0.9 crabs/trap in both habitats. In both bays, S. serrata occurred year round, but at greater abundance during the rainy season (June–September). Most crabs were 2–10 cm in carapace width, but some were up to 14 cm. Crabs were smaller in the mangroves (modal size 5 cm) than in the estuary (modal size 8 cm). The smallest crabs (2 cm) were collected in the mangroves in January and May, and the 3 cm crabs occurred most months except June, August, September, and November. The presence of smaller crabs in greater numbers in the mangroves indicates affinity for shallow, sediment-laden habitat with plenty of shelters in the form of mangrove roots and leaves. Very few crabs over 8 cm were captured in the mangroves. Crabs of 4–14 cm were captured in the estuaries, the 12–14 cm ones during July–October. The samples at each site formed several size groups every month, and ‗cohorts‘ could be discerned and followed over the next months. It was estimated that the 2–4 cm size group in January–May reached the size of 8–10 cm by October–November. Juvenile mud crabs apparently spent one year in the mangroves or estuaries. There were more males than females (1F:1.2M) in Tinagong Dagat, but the other way around (1M:1.3F) in Sapian Bay. Berried crabs of 14 cm were occasionally caught by filter net in Tinagong Dagat.
    • Book chapter

      Collection of the orange-spotted grouper Epinephelus coioides from Tinagong Dagat and Sapian Bay in northern Panay 

      NB Solis - In T Bagarinao (Ed.), Research Output of the Fisheries Sector Program, 2007 - Bureau of Agricultural Research, Department of Agriculture
      In Capiz, northern Panay, grouper catches by hand picking, hook and line, shelters, and fish corral were low throughout the year, on average 1-3 fish from each fishing operation, but higher in Tinagong Dagat than in Sapian Bay. Epinephelus coioides was the most common of the three grouper species collected; E. quoyanus and E. malabaricus were not numerous. The 882 specimens of E. coioides from Tinagong Dagat measured from 3.6 to 39 cm in standard length; the 250 E. coioides from Sapian Bay were between 1.7 and 31.2 cm SL. The size distribution showed a modal length of about 17 cm SL (21% of the fish) in Tinagong Dagat, and 11 cm (26%) in Sapian Bay. Small juveniles 2–8 cm were collected from Tinagong Dagat in January-April 1993, but not in Jan-Apr 1994. Such small juveniles were also collected from Sapian Bay in January and in April–August 1993. Groupers 9–23 cm occurred year round, but the 9–15 cm group was more abundant from January to June. At both sites, groupers >30 cm could hardly be found. Both grouper habitats experienced wide ranges of water temperature, salinity, and dissolved oxygen during the year.
    • Book

      Important fish and shrimp fry in Philippine coastal waters : identification, collection and handling 

      TU Bagarinao, NB Solis, WR Villaver & AC Villaluz - 1986 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
      Series: Aquaculture extension manual; No. 10
    • Conference paper

      A preliminary report on the fauna of decapod crustacea in the mangrove and estuarine areas of Batan Bay, Panay Island, Philippines 

      H Motoh & NB Solis - In Proceedings of the International Workshop on Mangrove and Estuarine Area Development for the Indo-Pacific Region, Manila, Philippines, 14-19 November 1977, 1977 - Los Baños, Laguna, Philippines: Philippine Council for Agricultural and Resources Research
      In the Philippines, the total mangrove site for aquaculture development and others is about 576,000 hectares which constitute only 1.9 percent of the country's land resources. There are at present about 176,000 hectares of fishponds, representing 30.5 percent of the total mangrove resources in the country.

      Located in the northern part of Panay Island, 11°40' latitude and 122°30' longitude, Batan Bay has approximately 2,500 hectares with the average water depth of less than 5 meters during low tide. This bay consists of Port Batan, Banga Baylet and numerous tidal creeks. More than 80 percent of the coastal line in the bay is surrounded by mangrove areas and the rest is rocky or coconut forest. Shrimp fishing is considered an important fishery in Batan Bay. The main objectives of this survey are: 1) To know the species, particularly edible ones, of decapod crustaceae found in the mangrove and estuarine areas; 2) To know their ecology and life history; and 3) To provide the biological data available for protection or preservation of the mangrove area.
    • Article

      Vertical distribution of euthecosomatous pteropods in the upper 100m of the Hilutangan Channel, Cebu, The Philippines 

      NB Solis & H Westernhagen - Marine Biology, 1978 - Springer-Verlag
      The vertical distribution of euthecosomatous pteropods in the upper 100 m of the Hilutangan Channel, Cebu, The Philippines was studied, based on 126 samples, comprising 47, 282 individuals. Thirty-min horizontal plankton tows were performed at depths of 1, 20, 50, 70 and 100 m in January and February 1972. Thirteen species -including 3 subspecies - of juvenile and adult euthecosomes were identified. In decreasing order of abundance the species are: Creseis acicula (20.4%), Limacina trochiformis (19.9%), Creseis virgula constricta (14.6%), L. inflata (10.5%), Clio pyramidata (9.9%), Creseis virgula conica (8.9%), L. bulimoides (7.3%), Diacria quadridentata (5.3%), Cavolinia longirostris (1.9%), Creseis virgula virgula (1.0%), Hyalocylix striata (0.1%), Cuvierina columella (0.08%), Cavolinia uncinata (0.002%). In 3 species, a large percentage were juveniles; for 1 species, Clio pyramidata , only juveniles were caught. The Vertical species distribution was similar to the distribution of the respective species in Caribbean and Bermuda waters. Temperature, salinity and dissolved oxygen influence vertical distribution little, if at all.