Now showing items 1-3 of 3

    • Book chapter

      Grow-out of the tiger shrimp Penaeus monodon in floating net cages in Batan Bay, northern Panay 

      JG Genodepa, MJ Sanoy & G Banehit - In T Bagarinao (Ed.), Research Output of the Fisheries Sector Program, 2007 - Bureau of Agricultural Research, Department of Agriculture
      The effects of two stocking densities and two feed combinations on growth, survival and production of the giant tiger shrimp Penaeus monodon in floating net cages were studied in an attempt to refine the existing technology on cage culture of tiger shrimp for the benefit of small- and medium-scale fish farmers. Four treatments were tested, replicated in time: stocking density of 100 shrimp/m2, feeding with 70% commercial shrimp pellets P and 30% 'trash fish' F; 100 shrimp/m2 and 50% P + 50% F; 200 shrimp/m2 and 70% P + 30% F; and 200 shrimp/m2 and 50% P + 50% F. Harvested after 93–95 d, the shrimps at the lower density treatments were significantly larger and had greater proportion of good sizes (>18 g body weight). Although the combination of 70% P + 30% F resulted in better growth, the combination of 50% P + 50% F resulted in more good-size shrimps. Survival, production, and gross income were not significantly different among treatments. None of the treatments in this study was economically viable. Gross income was very low due to poor growth and survival, mostly due to luminous vibriosis, then a new disease that eventually wiped out many shrimp hatcheries and ponds around Panay Island.
    • Conference paper

      Management strategies for grow-out culture of mud crab 

      JG Genodepa - In ET Quinitio, FD Parado-Estepa & RM Coloso (Eds.), Philippines : In the forefront of the mud crab industry development : proceedings of the 1st National Mud Crab Congress, 16-18 November 2015, Iloilo City, Philippines, 2017 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
      There is an increasing interest in mud crab farming because of the growing demand for mud crab in domestic and international markets. Different methods for rearing crabs in ponds, pens and cages have evolved through several years of research and experiences of farmers. Mud crabs are cultured in brackishwater earthen ponds and pens in mangroves. Fattening of lean crabs is also integrated with the grow-out culture system. Cannibalism is one of the major factors affecting the survival of crabs in growout ponds and pens. Hence, various strategies are recommended to reduce cannibalism such as stocking density of less than 2,000 crabs ha-1, provision of suitable shelters, sufficient quantity of natural food and formulated feeds that are evenly distributed in the pond or pen. Feeding rate used in the pen is adjusted to avoid excess feeds that can attract rats and other land animals that can damage the enclosures. Selective harvesting is normally practiced since mud crabs do not grow or get fattened at the same time even if they belong to the same batch.
    • Conference paper

      Pilot scale production of pellets suitable for mud crab Scylla serrata 

      RM Coloso, MR Catacutan, JP Peralta, JG Genodepa, K Duno & R Gardoce - In ET Quinitio, FD Parado-Estepa & RM Coloso (Eds.), Philippines : In the forefront of the mud crab industry development : proceedings of the 1st National Mud Crab Congress, 16-18 November 2015, Iloilo City, Philippines, 2017 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
      Studies were conducted towards the pilot scale production of stable and nutritionally adequate pellets suitable for mud crab Scylla serrata to help in efforts to increase mud crab production in the Philippines. Preliminary studies showed that mud crabs preferred pellets which were spherical or cylindrical and contained marine based attractants. Two practical diets were formulated and prepared in the Pilot Feed Mill of SEAFDEC/AQD. The extruded diets, along with a commercial mud crab grow-out diet, were subjected to proximate and Ca/P analyses as well as cholesterol analysis and water stability tests. The diets were fed to crabs in a controlled laboratory experiment using fiberglass tanks with flow-through, aerated seawater, and monitored from initial molt (M0) up to the second molt (M2). Tests revealed that the crabs fed Diet 1 (CP 48.28 %, CF 7.74 %, Ca 5.23%, P 12.93 %, cholesterol 0.173 %) showed the highest growth and better survival than those fed Diet 2 or commercial diet. Crabs fed Diet 1 took a shorter time to attain two molt cycles from M0. Survival was 70% after M2. Diet 1 was water stable within two hours. Abnormalities were observed including absent swimming legs or chelae, exposed gills, sores on exoskeleton, incomplete molting, or soft exoskeleton, but none that could be directly attributed to a specific treatment. Incomplete molting and slow hardening of the exoskeleton in crabs that accounted for the mortalities could be due to the low cholesterol levels in the diets especially in the commercial diet which had the lowest cholesterol level. Cholesterol supplementation of the artificial diet would be needed to improve molting success and survival of mud crabs in grow-out culture. The results of these experiments will be used to formulate a cost-effective grow-out diet for mud crab (supported by DOST-PCAARRD Grant in Aid).