Now showing items 1-5 of 5

    • Article

      Antibacterial activity of tilapia Tilapia hornorum against Vibrio harveyi 

      EA Tendencia, MR dela Peña, AC Fermin, G Lio-Po, CH Choresca Jr. & Y Inui - Aquaculture, 2004 - Elsevier
      Disease due to luminous Vibrio has been a major problem of the shrimp industry. Different technologies have been introduced to control the disease. One of the techniques reported to work against luminous bacteria in the Philippines is the green water culture system (or finfish–shrimp integrated culture system). A green water culture system is an innovative technique wherein shrimp are cultured in water collected from a pond where tilapia or other fish species are grown. In some cases, the fish are cultured in an isolated net pen inside the shrimp culture pond. This study clarifies the effect of one component of the green water culture system, the presence of all male tilapia (Tilapia hornorum) on luminous bacteria Vibrio harveyi. Results showed that stocking tilapia at a biomass not lower than 300 g/m3 efficiently inhibited the growth of luminous bacteria in shrimp (biomass=80 g/m3) rearing water without the growth of microalgae.
    • Article

      Effect of Epinephelus coioides, Chanos chanos, and GIFT tilapia in polyculture with Penaeus monodon on the growth of the luminous bacteria Vibrio harveyi 

      EA Tendencia, AC Fermin, MR dela Peña & CH Choresca Jr. - Aquaculture, 2006 - Elsevier
      Studies have shown that the presence of Tilapia hornorum hybrid has antibacterial effect against luminous bacteria. The present study aims to determine the effect of different fish species such as grouper, milkfish and tilapia in polyculture with shrimp on the growth of luminous bacteria. Results showed that stocking of tilapia Oreochromis niloticus hybrid and grouper Epinephelus coioides at a biomass of 500 g/m3 efficiently inhibited the growth of luminous bacteria in shrimp (biomass = 80 g/m3) rearing water and positively affected shrimp survival. Results also showed that the presence of milkfish Chanos chanos at a biomass of 500 g/m3 did not inhibit the growth of luminous bacteria in shrimp (biomass = 80 g/m3) rearing water.
    • Article

      Effect of shrimp biomass and feeding on the anti-Vibrio harveyi activity of Tilapia sp. in a simulated shrimp–tilapia polyculture system 

      EA Tendencia, MR dela Peña & CH Choresca Jr. - Aquaculture, 2006 - Elsevier
      The efficiency of Tilapia hornorum to control luminous bacteria in a simulated shrimp farm environment has been reported. However, the effects of different factors such as feed input and the shrimp biomass were not taken into consideration. This study investigated the effect of feeding and increased shrimp biomass on the efficiency of tilapia to inhibit the growth of luminous bacteria. Results showed that feeding enhances the antibacterial activity or improves the efficiency of tilapia to inhibit the growth of luminous bacteria. However, the efficiency of tilapia at a biomass of 500 g/m3 is reduced if the shrimp biomass is greater than 80 g/m3. This explains the discrepancies in the results obtained in the use of tilapia to control luminous bacterial disease in shrimp ponds.

      The effect of starvation on the bacterial load of tilapia, grouper and milkfish feces and the amount of feces in the intestine was also investigated. Results showed that total bacterial and presumptive Vibrio count of fish feces decreased after 1 week of starvation except for the presumptive Vibrio count of grouper. The amount of feces in the intestine also decreased as starvation progressed. Moreover, bacteria isolated from the three species have antibacterial activity against the luminous bacteria Vibrio harveyi.
    • Article

      Efficiency of Chlorella sp. and Tilapia hornorum in controlling the growth of luminous bacteria in a simulated shrimp culture environment 

      EA Tendencia, MR dela Peña & CH Choresca Jr. - Aquaculture, 2005 - Elsevier
      This study clarifies the effect of green water from Chlorella sp., Tilapia hornorum and the combination of the two organisms on the growth of luminous bacteria in a simulated shrimp culture environment. Results showed that the presence of Chlorella sp. (105 cells/ml) alone was not effective in the control of luminous bacteria in shrimp (biomass=80 g/m3) rearing water. The presence of T. hornorum alone (biomass=500 g/m3) was more efficient in controlling the growth of luminous bacteria than the co-existence of tilapia and Chlorella sp. Nevertheless, the presumptive Vibrio count was lowest in control tanks that had the highest shrimp survival rate, which was attributed to the presence of other micro-algae such as Chaetoceros, Thalassiosira, Navicula, Nitszchia, Melosira, and Fragilaria.
    • Article

      Presence of snapper, seabass, and siganid inhibits growth of luminous bacteria in a simulated shrimp culture system 

      EA Tendencia, MR dela Peña & CH Choresca Jr. - Aquaculture, 2006 - Elsevier
      The antibacterial effect of the presence of Tilapia hornorum against luminous bacteria in shrimp culture has been reported. This study investigates how the presence of commercially valued marine species such as seabass, snapper and siganid affect the growth of luminous bacteria in shrimp culture water. Results showed that luminous bacterial count of water stocked with seabass, siganid and snapper are significantly lower than those without fish. Therefore this study has demonstrated that seabass, siganid and snapper are alternative species for culture with shrimp to control or inhibit the growth of luminous bacteria in shrimp ponds.