Now showing items 1-3 of 3

    • Article

      The growth, survival and production of shrimp (Penaeus monodon) cultured with green mussel (Perna viridis) in semi-intensive ponds 

      KG Corre, VL Corre & W Gallardo - UPV Journal of Natural Sciences, 1997 - University of Philippines in the Visayas
      The culture of tiger shrimps (Penaeus monodon) with and without green mussels (Perna viridis) was compared in terms of animal growth, survival, production, and pond water quality. Tiger shrimps (2.6 g) were stocked at 50,000/ha in six 1,000 m2 earthen ponds. Green mussels (mean shell-on weight of 11 g) were stocked at 100,000/ha on ropes suspended from bamboo rafts in three of these ponds. The growth and survival of tiger shrimps were not significantly different when cultured with or without mussels. Higher shrimp production (1,528.2 kg/ha) was obtained when these were cultured with mussels than without (1,327.5 kg/ha). Water quality did not vary significantly between treatments but ponds with both shrimp and mussel had lesser algae, lower biological oxygen demand and particulate organic matter levels, and generally higher morning dissolved oxygen concentrations compared with ponds without mussels. Results show the potential of green mussels as biological filters in shrimp ponds.
    • Article

      Improved resistance against White Spot Virus (WSV) infection in tiger shrimp, Penaeus monodon by combined supplementation of peptidoglycan and mannan oligosaccharide (MOS) 

      MJS Apines-Amar, KGS Andrino, EC Amar, RE Cadiz & VL Corre Jr. - Extreme Life, Biospeology and Astrobiology, 2014 - Bioflux Society
      An eight-week feeding trial was conducted to evaluate the effects of combined supplementation of peptidoglycan and mannan oligosaccharide (MOS) in tiger shrimp, Penaeus monodon. Tiger shrimp (0.29 ± 0.02 g) were fed diets supplemented with different levels of peptidoglycan + (MOS) as immunostimulants for six (6) and eight (8) weeks. Four (4) experimental diets were formulated to contain 0, 0.1, 0.2, and 0.4% peptidoglycan + MOS. The feeding trial was conducted in 250 L capacity concrete circular tanks (replicated four (4) times) with 20 shrimp per tank. Growth, survival, respiratory burst activity, total hemocyte count (THC), and in vivo resistance to WSV infection were evaluated. Weight gain of the shrimp was significantly higher in the immunostimulant-fed groups compared to the control. However, different levels of the immunostimulants did not differ in their effect on the the growth of the shrimp. On the other hand, respiratory burst activity and total haemocyte count (THC) were significantly higher in the group supplemented with 0.2% peptidoglycan + MOS than the rest of the treatments. Likewise, survival after infection with White Spot Virus (WSV) was significantly increased in the 0.2% peptidoglycan + MOS compared to the other groups. The present results demonstrated that using peptidoglycan and MOS together at 0.2% of the diet improves growth, activates immune responses such as respiratory burst activity and THC in P. monodon and give better protection to the shrimp against WSV infection.
    • Article

      Induction of moulting in hatchery-reared mangrove crab Scylla serrata juveniles through temperature manipulation or autotomy 

      JJY de la Cruz-Huervana, ET Quinitio & VL Corre - Aquaculture Research, 2019 - Wiley
      The effects of temperature and autotomy of chelipeds on survival, growth and moulting of mangrove crab (Scylla serrata) juveniles were investigated under laboratory conditions for 60 days. Hatchery-produced crabs with 2.0?2.3 cm internal carapace width (1.7?2.2 g body weight) at intermoult stage were exposed to one of four temperature treatments (constant 29, 32 or 35°C, or ambient [24?31°C]) or subjected to cheliped autotomy. All crabs held at 35°C had 100% mortality due to incomplete moulting during first moult. The mean survival of crabs at termination was 58%, 64% and 50% for ambient temperature, 29 and 32°C respectively. Specific growth rate (SGR) of crabs in the ambient and 29°C were comparable but significantly lower than those at 32°C. The moult interval of the crabs was significantly shorter in treatments with constant water temperature of 29 and 32°C compared with ambient temperature. The survival of crabs with intact chelipeds was comparable with those with one or two autotomized chelipeds. Crabs with intact or one autotomized chelipeds had significantly higher SGR than crabs with both chelipeds autotomized in the first moult. On the second moult, however, high SGR was observed in crabs with two chelipeds autotomized. The moult interval was significantly shorter in the autotomized crabs compared with crabs with intact chelipeds. The results suggest that the optimum water temperature for rearing S. serrata juveniles ranges from 29 to 32°C. Likewise, autotomy of chelipeds can promote moulting without adversely affecting survival of crabs.