Now showing items 1-4 of 4

    • Book chapter

      Amino and fatty acid profiles of wild-sourced grouper (Epinephelus coioides) broodstock and larvae 

      VR Alava, FMP Priolo, JD Toledo, JC Rodriguez Jr., GF Quinitio, AC Sa-an, MR de la Peña & RD Caturao - In MA Rimmer, S McBride & KC Williams (Eds.), Advances in grouper aquaculture, 2004 - Australian Centre for International Agricultural Research
      Series: ACIAR Monograph 110
      This study was undertaken to provide information on the levels of amino acids in the muscle, liver and gonad of wild-sourced broodstock and larvae, as well as in neurula eggs and day 35 larvae from a hatchery. The fatty acid composition of grouper broodstock tissues was also determined. Samples were analysed for crude protein, amino acids, total lipids and fatty acid contents. Muscle contained higher levels of crude protein and amino acids than the ovary and liver. At the early maturing stage, the grouper ovarian protein was 73.3% and lipid was 19.3%, indicating the high dietary requirements of these nutrients for ovarian development. The crude protein and amino acid contents in wild-sourced larvae were higher than that in eggs and larvae from the hatchery.
    • Book chapter

      Changes in the gastrointestinal tract and associated organs during early development of the grouper (Epinephelus coioides) 

      GF Quinitio, AC Sa-an, JD Toledo & JD Tan-Fermin - In MA Rimmer, S McBride & KC Williams (Eds.), Advances in grouper aquaculture, 2004 - Australian Centre for International Agricultural Research
      Series: ACIAR Monograph 110
      The histomorphological changes in the gastrointestinal tract of Epinephelus coioides and associated organs during its early development were studied. Larvae of E. coioides were reared in 5-tonne tanks using the semi-intensive culture system. Larval samples were collected at days 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 14, 16, 20, 25, 30, 35, 40, 45 and 60. The total length (TL) of about 10-20 larvae per sampling was measured. At least 3 samples were examined from each stage for longitudinal sections using light microscopy. The digestive tract of day 0 larvae was a straight, undifferentiated tube composed of simple cuboidal cells. At day 2, cellular differentiation was observed in the pharynx, oesophagus, primordial stomach and intestine. The primordial stomach broadened into a voluminous pouch at day 10. The gastric gland was observed in the stomach from day 20. Day 35 seemed to be the proper time to feed larvae with minced fish when using the semi-intensive rearing system. Insignificant histomorphological changes in the metamorphosing grouper larvae were observed from days 40-60.
    • Book chapter

      Lipid nutrition studies on grouper (Epinephelus coioides) larvae 

      VR Alava, FMP Priolo, JD Toledo, JC Rodriguez Jr., GF Quinitio, AC Sa-an, MR de la Peña & RD Caturao - In MA Rimmer, S McBride & KC Williams (Eds.), Advances in grouper aquaculture, 2004 - Australian Centre for International Agricultural Research
      Series: ACIAR Monograph 110
      The main objectives of this project were to study the lipid chain transfer from the egg stage through hatching and the patterns of lipid conservation or loss during starvation and feeding of larvae in order to elucidate the lipid metabolism of grouper (Phase 1); to determine the fatty acid composition of highly unsaturated fatty acid (HUFA) boosters and enriched live food organisms to enable the possibility of choosing food organisms that provide various dietary levels and ratios of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and arachidonic acid (ARA, Phase 2); and to determine the effect of Brachionus and Artemia, containing different levels and ratios of DHA:EPA:ARA, on the growth and survival of grouper larvae (Phase 3). Total lipids (TL) of samples were extracted and separated into neutral (NL) and polar lipids (PL). The samples collected in Phase 1 were floating neurula eggs, newly hatched (NHL) and unfed 4-day larvae; larvae fed with live food organisms for 25 and 35 days or starved for 3 days; and wild-sourced larvae starved for a week. In Phase 2, the samples collected were phytoplanktons, Brachionus cultured in phytoplankton for 4 days, Diaphanosoma celebensis and Pseudodiaptomus annandalei. In phase 3, larvae were fed Brachionus until day 14 and at day 25 with Artemia. E. coioides eggs contained high DHA, EPA and ARA, demonstrating their importance in larval development. Larvae primarily spent NL as energy, whereas PL was generally conserved. Wild grouper larvae had higher levels of PL than NL, whereas hatchery-sourced eggs and larvae contained higher levels of NL than PL. Based on the lipid content of wild larvae, high phospholipid diets were essential for larvae survival and normal development. A variety of products were effective in enriching the HUFA content (particularly ratios of DHA, EPA and ARA) of live food organisms. HUFA-enriched live food organisms enhanced the growth, survival and pigmentation in grouper larvae.
    • Book chapter

      Localisation of enzymes in the digestive system during early development of the grouper (Epinephelus coioides) 

      GF Quinitio, AC Sa-an, JD Toledo & JD Tan-Fermin - In MA Rimmer, S McBride & KC Williams (Eds.), Advances in grouper aquaculture, 2004 - Australian Centre for International Agricultural Research
      Series: ACIAR Monograph 110
      This study was undertaken to investigate the occurrence of some digestive enzymes in the gastrointestinal tract during early development in the grouper. This work was conducted to provide information on formulating an appropriate feeding scheme and an artificial diet for the early development of the grouper, Epinephelus coioides. Larvae of E. coioides were reared in 5 tonne rectangular concrete tanks. The digestive enzymes localized were acid phosphatase (ACP), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), nonspecific esterase (NSE), aminopeptidase (AMP), trypsin (TRP), maltase (MAL) and lipase (LIP). Weak enzyme activity occurred during the yolk sac stage. High AMP activity started at day 14 prior to Artemia feeding at day 16. Fluctuations in TRP activity might be related to stomach formation. Occurrence of MAL during early development demonstrated a capacity to digest carbohydrates. An increase in LIP activity coincided with the occurrence of gastric glands. Insignificant changes in digestive enzymes were observed in the metamorphosing grouper larvae from day 40 to 60.