Now showing items 1-3 of 3

    • Book

      Development and management of milkfish broodstock 

      OS Reyes, EGT de Jesus-Ayson, BE Eullaran, VL Corre Jr. & FG Ayson - 2015 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
      Series: Aquaculture extension manual; No. 62
      The manual provides developed and refined techniques for collection and transport of spawned eggs and larvae, as well as larval rearing. It also describes the necessary facilities for maintaining milkfish broodstock.

      Guidelines on transporting broodstock, performing biopsy to determine sex of spawners, collecting and cleaning eggs, packing and transporting eggs to hatchery, incubating and hatching eggs, and packing and transporting of larvae are also provided in the manual.

      The importance of nutritional quality of the diet in relation to the performance of the milkfish broodstock and quality of resulting eggs and larvae is also explained in the manual.

      Broodstock feeds are enriched with vitamin C, beta-carotene, and other nutrients for better reproductive performance of broodstock and better egg and larval quality. It also offers formula to initially estimate the number of spawned eggs and determine the hatching rate.

      The manual guides stakeholders and operators who are interested in setting up breeding facilities for milkfish.
    • Book

      Health management of milkfish Chanos chanos 

      ER Cruz-Lacierda, EG Estante, EGT de Jesus-Ayson & VL Corre Jr. - 2015 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
      This monograph provides updated information on diseases of marine and brackishwater cultured milkfish in the Philippines. The information presented here is largely based on the results of a three-year research project on milkfish at the University of the Philippines Visayas funded by the Department of Science and Technology (DOST). The project involved surveillance and monitoring of hatchery, nursery and grow-out operations for occurrence of diseases as well as on disease diagnosis, prevention and control. Previously documented reports in the Philippines and in other documents, both published and unpublished, are also included in this monograph. The diseases are discussed on a culture phase basis, that is, disease problems encountered in hatchery-reared larvae and fry are listed first, followed by diseases observed in fingerlings and juveniles grown in nursery and grow-out culture areas, and adult stages maintained in broodstock facilities. Information regarding the causative agent, diagnostic procedures, and methods of prevention and control for each disease are provided, if available.
    • Book chapter

      Treatment of shrimp pond effluents by sedimentation and by seaweed and mussel biofiltration 

      NR Fortes & VL Corre Jr. - In T Bagarinao (Ed.), Research Output of the Fisheries Sector Program, 2007 - Bureau of Agricultural Research, Department of Agriculture
      Tiger shrimp Penaeus monodon were stocked in three 1,000 m2 ponds at 12,000 juveniles/pond and grown for 141 days. Water quality in the ponds was monitored over the grow-out period, particularly before and after every water change. BOD, chlorophyll a, and total dissolved solids of the effluent increased over the grow-out period due to increased biomass and feed input. Similar trends were observed for inorganic nitrogen, reactive phosphorus, total suspended solids, and hydrogen sulfide. Concentrations decreased after draining and reflooding. Soil samples also showed increases in organic matter available phosphate, carbon, and nitrogen content over the grow-out period.

      Effluents from semi-intensive shrimp ponds were discharged into eight treatment ponds (each 200 m2): three sedimentation ponds, three with Gracilaria stocked at 20 kg/pond, and two with mussels stocked at 10/m2. Measurements were made of pH, ammonia, nitrite, nitrate, reactive phosphorus, biochemical oxygen demand, chlorophyll a, total suspended solids, and total dissolved solids in the water in the treatment ponds after effluent addition, one week and two weeks later, and before draining. Soil pH, organic matter, and phosphorus were also analyzed every two weeks. The changes in these variables were similar among the three treatments in the eight ponds. In this study, water quality of effluents improved after one week in the treatment ponds.