Now showing items 1-5 of 5

    • Article

      Clearance rates and ingestion efficiency of the Japanese scallop Patinopecten yessoensis 

      FA Aya, Y Hidaka & I Kudo - Plankton and Benthos Research, 2013 - Plankton Society of Japan
      In coastal ecosystems, variations in food quantity may have significant effects on the clearance and ingestion rates of suspension-feeding bivalves. In this study, clearance rates and ingestion efficiencies were determined for Japanese scallop (Patinopecten yessoensis) juveniles (60.6±4.5 mm in shell height) under laboratory conditions. Scallops were kept individually in glass beakers at 15°C and fed with different cell numbers of Pavlova sp. (0.8 to 57.60×106 cells) to provide a wide range of food quantity as particulate organic carbon (POC). Clearance rates (CR) and ingestion efficiencies (IE) were estimated by monitoring POC concentration over a two-day period, and from 2 to 14 days of feeding, respectively. Both CR and IE were significantly influenced by POC concentration. CR ranged from 15.8 to 38.5 mL ind-1 h-1 (or 8.9 to 49.6 mg Ch-1 g dry weight-1) with maximum values at high POC concentrations. IE varied from 40 to 71% and differed significantly between the lowest (2,900 μg C L-1) and highest (8,000 μg C L-1) food rations. The feeding response of juvenile scallops to different POC concentrations was fitted to a power curve equation: IE (%)=0.9272×POC0.5105, r=0.98. Extrapolated field-based estimates of IE ranged from 7.8 to 12.7% in response to seasonal changes in POC concentration (64.5 to 168.6 μg C L-1). It is concluded that particle filtration rates by juvenile scallops are related to food quantity, as suggested by both field and laboratory-derived feeding rates.
    • Article

      Diet composition, feed preferences and mouth morphology of early stage silver therapon (Leiopotherapon plumbeus, Kner 1864) larvae reared in outdoor tanks 

      FA Aya, MNC Corpuz & LMB Garcia - Journal of Applied Ichthyology, 2015 - Wiley
      This study examined the diet composition, feeding preferences, and mouth morphology of the silver therapon (Leiopotherapon plumbeus, Kner 1864) larvae under captive conditions. Larvae were reared in outdoor tanks (4 m3) with natural food grown 2 weeks prior to start of larval rearing. Food preference was measured by the Chesson's electivity index (αi). Gut content analysis of larvae sampled between 5 and 25 days after hatching (DAH) showed the dominance in the diet by zooplankton, mainly copepod nauplii, cladocerans and insect larvae. Small fish larvae (5–9 DAH; 3.32–6.29 mm standard length) preferred cladocerans, ciliates and copepod nauplii; whereas older larvae (12–25 DAH; 5.45–19.26 mm standard length) preferred insect larvae over cladocerans and adult insects. The mouth gape size at 5 DAH was 359 μm and increased to 3.75 mm at 40 DAH when body size grew at an average rate of 0.59 mm d−1. The standard length (SL) of L. plumbeus larvae was strongly associated with mouth size (r2 = 0.98, P < 0.05), indicating a progressive increase of ingested prey size of the fish larvae. These results clarified the early life feeding ecology of this species, which is essential in developing effective hatchery techniques.
    • Article

      Embryonic and larval development of hatchery-reared silver therapon Leiopotherapon plumbeus (Perciformes: Terapontidae) 

      FA Aya, VSN Nillasca, LMB Garcia & Y Takagi - Ichthyological Research, 2016 - Springer Verlag
      The embryonic and larval development of hatchery-reared silver therapon Leiopotherapon plumbeus are described to provide essential information on the early life history of this species. Egg size, larval size at hatching, yolk resorption rate, onset of feeding and development of some morphological characters were examined. Fertilized eggs (430–610 µm in diameter) were spherical, yellowish, demersal and slightly adhesive. First cleavage occurred 6 min post-fertilization and embryos hatched 21–24 h post-fertilization under ambient temperature of 27.5 ± 0.1 °C. Newly hatched larvae [1.79 ± 0.04 mm in total length (TL)] with yolk volume of 0.579 ± 0.126 mm3 had no functional or pigmented eyes, mouth or digestive tract. The eyes became fully pigmented and mouth opened [31 and 36.5 hours post-hatching (hph)] shortly before yolk resorption at 39 hph and when larvae had grown to 2.65 ± 0.14 mm in TL. Some morphological characters such as total length, pre-anal length and eye diameter decreased following yolk resorption, which also coincided with the development of foraging capacities shortly before exogenous feeding was initiated. L. plumbeus larvae initiated exogenous feeding at 54 hph, indicating a short (15 h after yolk resorption) transitional feeding period. Larval growth at the early stages of development (54–72 hph) was rapid and steadily increased from 288 to 720 hph, when larvae, 12.05 ± 4.02 mm in TL, closely resembled the external characteristics of their adult conspecifics.
    • Conference paper

      Optimization of feeding and growth conditions for hatchery-bred larvae of indigenous Philippine silver perch, Leiopotherapon plumbeus (Perciformes: Terapontidae) 

      JA Añano, F Aya, MN Corpuz & MRR Romana-Eguia - In MRR Romana-Eguia, FD Parado-Estepa, ND Salayo & MJH Lebata-Ramos (Eds.), Resource Enhancement and Sustainable Aquaculture Practices in Southeast Asia: Challenges in Responsible Production … International Workshop on Resource Enhancement and Sustainable Aquaculture Practices in Southeast Asia 2014 (RESA), 2015 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
      The Philippine silver perch, locally known as ayungin, is an endemic fish species and is considered as a potential candidate for aquaculture and for stock enhancement. However, high mortality associated with early larval stages presents a significant bottleneck to its latent commercialization. Culture experiments considered interactions among prey proportions, growth conditions and their consequences on fish growth performance and survival. Two phases of the experiment were conducted: (1) a short duration feeding trial utilizing different prey proportions of Brachionus calyciflorus and Moina macrocopa and (2) an indoor larval rearing technique that ensured optimum growth and survival of juveniles. Findings of this research will be used to propose an efficient rearing strategy addressing the aquaculture of this indigenous species.
    • Conference paper

      Potential of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L.) meal as an alternative protein source in diets for giant freshwater prawn (Macrobrachium rosenbergii, de Man 1879) 

      FA Aya, ML Cuvin-Aralar & RM Coloso - In MRR Romana-Eguia, FD Parado-Estepa, ND Salayo & MJH Lebata-Ramos (Eds.), Resource Enhancement and Sustainable Aquaculture Practices in Southeast Asia: Challenges in Responsible Production … International Workshop on Resource Enhancement and Sustainable Aquaculture Practices in Southeast Asia 2014 (RESA), 2015 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
      Growth trials were conducted to evaluate cowpea Vigna unguiculata (L.) meal as a potential protein source in diets for giant freshwater prawn, Macrobrachium rosenbergii (de Man 1879), reared in tank and lake-based cages. Five isonitrogenous (approximately 37% crude protein) and isocaloric diets were formulated where fish meal (FM) protein was replaced with 0%, 15%, 30%, 45% and 60% cowpea meal protein (or CP0, CP15, CP30, CP45, and CP60, respectively). Results of an 8-week tank trial showed that the final body weight (FBW), percent weight gain, specific growth rate (SGR) and survival of prawns were not significantly influenced by dietary treatments (P > 0.05), although the highest values, except for survival, were observed with CP45. In a lakebased cage trial that lasted for 16 weeks, prawns fed CP30 and CP45 had significantly higher FBW (13.1 and 14.4 g, respectively) compared to other treatment groups (P < 0.05). SGR (4.52 5.00%/ day), survival rates (53-77%), yield (98.5-116.5 g m-2) and feed conversion ratio (FCR; 2.0-2.7) were not affected by increasing levels of cowpea meal in the diets. Based on these results, cowpea meal can be considered as an alternative protein source in diets for M. rosenbergii.