Now showing items 1-5 of 5

    • Conference paper

      Defects in the handling, storage and transport of mud crab 

      JP Peralta & DS Cheung - In ET Quinitio, FD Parado-Estepa & RM Coloso (Eds.), Philippines : In the forefront of the mud crab industry development : proceedings of the 1st National Mud Crab Congress, 16-18 November 2015, Iloilo City, Philippines, 2017 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
      Consumers prefer to buy live mud crabs (Scylla). Moribund and dead crabs have very low market value. Immediately after harvest, the crabs are tied to render their claws immobile. The time between harvest and arrival of crabs at the final destination is 3-5 days. During the holding and transport period, the crabs are no longer fed and are sometimes subjected to stressful conditions (e.g. high temperature) which may result to weight loss, muscle emaciation and other undesirable conditions of the crabs, and mortality. Likewise, ammoniacal odor (strong urine-like smell) that affects flavor is sometimes observed. Crabs with emaciated muscle and undesirable odor are considered rejects.

      This paper presents the initial results of the project on the Improvement in the Handling, Storage and Transport of Mud Crabs under Sub-program C entitled Improvement of Feeds and Stock Management Practices in Mud Crab Grow-out Culture under the National Mud Crab Science and Technology Program.
    • Article

      Dietary administration of dehydroepiandrosterone hormone influences sex differentiation of hybrid red tilapia (O. niloticus x O. mossambicus) larvae 

      AH Mohamed, RFM Traifalgar, AE Serrano Jr., JP Peralta & FL Pedroso - Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Science, 2012 - Academic Journals, New York
      Effects of a steroid hormone Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) on sex differentiation of hybrid red Tilapia Oreochromis niloticus x O. mossambicus larvae were investigated. Three day-old tilapia larvae were fed diets supplemented with varying concentrations of DHEA (0, 20, 40, 80 and 160 mg kg-1 feed) for 24 days. A positive control group fed with diet containing 60 mg kg-1 of 17α-methyl testosterone was also included in the experimental run. Results indicate that among the DHEA treatment groups, larvae fed with 160 mg kg-1 DHEA showed the highest percentage of males that is comparable to the number of differentiated male fish observed in treatment group receiving the 17α-methyl testosterone as the positive control group. DHEA supplementation also improves weight gain and enhances feed conversion ratio. These findings suggest that DHEA can be used as a dietary supplement to induce masculinization and can improve the growth performance of tilapia larvae.
    • Conference paper

      Handling, storage and transport conditions of mud crabs in trading centers 

      JP Peralta & JPD Chan - In ET Quinitio, FD Parado-Estepa & RM Coloso (Eds.), Philippines : In the forefront of the mud crab industry development : proceedings of the 1st National Mud Crab Congress, 16-18 November 2015, Iloilo City, Philippines, 2017 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
      This study aims to improve the handling, storage and transport conditions of mud crabs. The usual practice of the crab growers in the Philippines is to bring the market size crabs to middlemen, brokers or operators of small trading centers immediately after harvest; then the crabs are brought to municipal traders or operators of bigger buying station. The crabs are sent to the exporters in Manila or Cebu. The crabs are exported mostly to Singapore, Taiwan, Hongkong and mainland China. The crabs are classified based on the species, body weight, sex, gonad maturity and intactness of limbs. Crabs are rejected for export when they are soft-shelled, very lean, or have incomplete limbs and abnormalities. Crabs with emaciated muscle (‘hagas’), ammoniacal odor (strong urine-like smell) and in an undesirable state are also rejected.

      This paper presents the initial results of the project on the Improvement in the handling, storage and transport of mud crabs under Sub-program C entitled Improvement of Feeds and Stock Management Practices in Mud Crab Grow-out Culture under the National Mud Crab Science and Technology Program. It also presents issues and concerns on the present practices, and presents possible recommendations.
    • Conference paper

      Philippine National Standard for Live Mud Crabs: establishing food safety and quality requirements 

      MF Matubang, TS Palomares, JP Peralta, ET Quinitio, RJ Ragaza, JV Alejo, PB Regazpi, CE Romero, HA Montoya, JG Trinidad & KKA Roscom - In ET Quinitio, FD Parado-Estepa & RM Coloso (Eds.), Philippines : In the forefront of the mud crab industry development : proceedings of the 1st National Mud Crab Congress, 16-18 November 2015, Iloilo City, Philippines, 2017 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
      The Bureau of Agriculture and Fisheries Standards (BAFS) of the Department of Agriculture (DA), in collaboration with the relevant government and research agencies, academe and industry organization, is currently developing the Philippine National Standard (PNS) for live mangrove crabs (also known as mud crabs). This PNS defines the food safety and quality requirements for live mangrove crabs in order to ensure consumers’ health and make the product globally competitive. The process in the development of standards include review of the existing requirements of local and foreign markets and internationally recognized standards, creation of the Technical Working Group, initial drafting of the PNS, conduct of public consultations in major production areas, finalization of the draft for the PNS, notification to the World Trade Organization and approval of the DA Secretary.

      The PNS for live mangrove crabs specifies the scope of the standard, product description, essential composition and quality factors, hygiene, handling, labeling requirements, methods of sampling, examination and analysis, definition of defectives, and the requirements for product lot acceptance.
    • Conference paper

      Pilot scale production of pellets suitable for mud crab Scylla serrata 

      RM Coloso, MR Catacutan, JP Peralta, JG Genodepa, K Duno & R Gardoce - In ET Quinitio, FD Parado-Estepa & RM Coloso (Eds.), Philippines : In the forefront of the mud crab industry development : proceedings of the 1st National Mud Crab Congress, 16-18 November 2015, Iloilo City, Philippines, 2017 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
      Studies were conducted towards the pilot scale production of stable and nutritionally adequate pellets suitable for mud crab Scylla serrata to help in efforts to increase mud crab production in the Philippines. Preliminary studies showed that mud crabs preferred pellets which were spherical or cylindrical and contained marine based attractants. Two practical diets were formulated and prepared in the Pilot Feed Mill of SEAFDEC/AQD. The extruded diets, along with a commercial mud crab grow-out diet, were subjected to proximate and Ca/P analyses as well as cholesterol analysis and water stability tests. The diets were fed to crabs in a controlled laboratory experiment using fiberglass tanks with flow-through, aerated seawater, and monitored from initial molt (M0) up to the second molt (M2). Tests revealed that the crabs fed Diet 1 (CP 48.28 %, CF 7.74 %, Ca 5.23%, P 12.93 %, cholesterol 0.173 %) showed the highest growth and better survival than those fed Diet 2 or commercial diet. Crabs fed Diet 1 took a shorter time to attain two molt cycles from M0. Survival was 70% after M2. Diet 1 was water stable within two hours. Abnormalities were observed including absent swimming legs or chelae, exposed gills, sores on exoskeleton, incomplete molting, or soft exoskeleton, but none that could be directly attributed to a specific treatment. Incomplete molting and slow hardening of the exoskeleton in crabs that accounted for the mortalities could be due to the low cholesterol levels in the diets especially in the commercial diet which had the lowest cholesterol level. Cholesterol supplementation of the artificial diet would be needed to improve molting success and survival of mud crabs in grow-out culture. The results of these experiments will be used to formulate a cost-effective grow-out diet for mud crab (supported by DOST-PCAARRD Grant in Aid).