Now showing items 1-2 of 2

    • Article

      Antibacterial activity of tilapia Tilapia hornorum against Vibrio harveyi 

      EA Tendencia, MR dela Peña, AC Fermin, G Lio-Po, CH Choresca Jr. & Y Inui - Aquaculture, 2004 - Elsevier
      Disease due to luminous Vibrio has been a major problem of the shrimp industry. Different technologies have been introduced to control the disease. One of the techniques reported to work against luminous bacteria in the Philippines is the green water culture system (or finfish–shrimp integrated culture system). A green water culture system is an innovative technique wherein shrimp are cultured in water collected from a pond where tilapia or other fish species are grown. In some cases, the fish are cultured in an isolated net pen inside the shrimp culture pond. This study clarifies the effect of one component of the green water culture system, the presence of all male tilapia (Tilapia hornorum) on luminous bacteria Vibrio harveyi. Results showed that stocking tilapia at a biomass not lower than 300 g/m3 efficiently inhibited the growth of luminous bacteria in shrimp (biomass=80 g/m3) rearing water without the growth of microalgae.
    • Article

      Molecular epidemiology of koi herpesvirus 

      J Kurita, K Yuasa, T Ito, M Sano, RP Hedrick, MY Engelsma, OLM Haenen, A Sunarto, EB Kholidin, HY Chou, MC Tung, L de la Peña, G Lio-Po, C Tu, K Way & T Iida - Fish Pathology, 2009 - Japanese Society of Fish Pathology
      Three regions of koi herpesvirus (KHV) genomic DNA were compared for 34 samples from Japan, six from Indonesia, two from Taiwan, one from the Philippines, 13 from the Netherlands, one from the UK, one from the USA and one from Israel. The analyzed genomic regions included known PCR-detection targets (SphI-5, 9/5 and the thymidine kinase gene). The KHVs from Asian countries were very homogeneous, although two variants were noted based on a single nucleotide polymorphism. In contrast, seven variants were found in KHVs from outside of Asia, and although closely related to one another, they were clearly distinct from those from Asian. The results suggest that a clear genetic distinction exists between Asian and European (including each single isolate from the USA and Israel) types of KHV, and that unique types of KHV were independently introduced or emerged in the respective geographic locations.