Now showing items 1-5 of 5

    • Article

      The effect of different binders on the water stability of feeds for prawn 

      F Piedad-Pascual, L Bandonil & WH Destajo - SEAFDEC Aquaculture Department Quarterly Research Report, 1978 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
      Corn starch, gelatin, sago palm starch, agar, and bread flour were tested for their binding capacity in pelleted diets for Penaeus monodon . Agar was found to be good binder, but it costs too much, while bread flour was also good but as it's commonly used for human comsumption its use for animal feed should be minimized. The use of 20% bread flour, or a combination of 5% sago palm starch or corn starch with 15% bread flour is recommended, depending on the cost and availability. Basic composition of the formulated diet is tabulated, as is water stability of 2 and 4 mm diameter steamed pellets after 2, 6 and 18 h.
    • Article

      Effects of crude, semipurified and purified starch of sago (Metroxylon sagu Rottb.) on the water stability of pelleted shrimp diets 

      C Lim & W Destajo - SEAFDEC Aquaculture Department Quarterly Research Report, 1978 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
      A study was conducted to determine the comparative effectiveness of purified, semipurified and crude starch of sago as binders for pelleted shrimp diets. The diet containing semipurified sago starch had the highest water stability (79.1%). The values were nearly the same for the pellets bound with purified and crude sago starch. Reasons for the low binding capacity of purified and crude sago could be that the gel of purified sago is weakened due to purification, and that of the crude sago is due to the spongy material present in the product. Thus, semipurified sago starch is a better source of binder and purified crude sago. From the economic viewpoint, the cost of purified sago is prohibitive for use as binder. Both semipurified and crude sago palm starch are acceptable. Composition of shrimp diets containing various sources of sago palm starch, and binder cost and water stability of shrimp diets containing various sources of sago palm starch tested at 3, 6 and 12 hours, are tabulated.
    • Article

      Growth and survival of Penaeus monodon postlarvae fed shrimp head meal and fish meal as primary animal source of protein 

      F Piedad-Pascual & WH Destajo - SEAFDEC Aquaculture Department Quarterly Research Report, 1978 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
      Although shrimp head meal alone does not provide for good growth and survival, fish meal can provide high survival rate. The addition of shrimp head improves this diet. It is suggested that cholesterol present in shrimp could have caused this difference. Composition of the test diets is tabulated, as are proximate chemical analysis of the diets, and the mean initial weights, final weights, weight gains, survival rate, feed consumed, protein consumed, of Penaeus monodon postlarvae, feed conversion and protein efficiency ratio.
    • Article

      Growth and survival of Penaeus monodon postlarvae fed shrimp head meal and fish meal as primary animal sources of protein 

      F Piedad-Pascual & WH Destajo - Fisheries Research Journal of the Philippines, 1979 - Fisheries Research Society of the Philippines
      Penaeus monodon postlarvae with mean weights of 2 to 3 g were fed shrimp head meal (Diet B), fish meal (Diet C), mussel (Diet E), a combination of equal amounts of shrimp head meal and fish meal (Diet A) or one part shrimp head meal and 2 parts fish meal (Diet D) as primary sources of protein. The larvae were reared for 30 days in cylindrical fiberglass tanks containing 150 l of aerated seawater. Mean weight gains were significantly highest among those fed combinations ofish meal and shrimp head meal. Diets A and D, 0.88 g and 0.59 g, respectively. Mean weight gains among those fed one main source of protein, Diets B, C and E were not significantly different from each other and were very low. Highest survival rate was observed among hose fed Diet C (85%) and the lowest recorded (45%) was obtained from those fed mussel. Those fed Diet B grew the slowest and had the lowest survival rate of the groups given formulated diets. Shrimp head meal and fish meal complement each other in the diet formulations. Shrimp head meal alone does not provide for growth and survival, but fish meal can provide for high survival rate. The addition of shrimp head improves the diet. Cholesterol which is present in shrimp could have caused the difference.