Now showing items 1-9 of 9

    • magazineArticle

      Co-management and marine reserves 

      MB Surtida, RIY Adan & AP Surtida - SEAFDEC Asian Aquaculture, 2001 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
    • Conference paper

      Current status of koi herpesvirus disease in Taiwan 

      C Tu, SY Lin & HT Sung - In CR Lavilla-Pitogo & K Nagasawa (Eds.), Transboundary Fish Diseases in Southeast Asia: Occurence, Surveillance, Research and Training. Proceedings of … Diseases in Southeast Asia: Occurence, Surveillance, Research and Training, Manila, Philippines, 23-24 June 2004, 2004 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
      The first reported case of koi herpesvirus disease (KHVD) occurred in northern Taiwan in December 2002. Later, there were three more cases in 2003 and one outbreak of KHVD in 2004. Externally, the affected fish did not show any prominent lesions except swollen gills sometimes accompanied by bleeding. Consistent histopathological findings were in the gill tissues, where hyperplasic epithelia and eosinophilic granular cells were observed within fused secondary lamellae. Electron microscopy revealed negativelystained icosahedral viral nucleocapsids measuring 112?1 nm in diameter. Also, the koi herpesvirus was detected in the homogenate of diseased fish by PCR assay using specific primers for koi herpesvirus (KHV). The amplicon was cloned, sequenced and compared with previously published data. The sequenced data showed 99% identity with the American KHV sequence in the GenBank. The above evidence suggests that KHVD have already invaded carp culture systems in Taiwan.
    • Conference paper

      Gonadal development and induced breeding of captive milkfish in Taiwan 

      IC Liao & TI Chen - In JV Juario, RP Ferraris & LV Benitez (Eds.), Advances in milkfish biology and culture: Proceedings of the Second International Milkfish Aquaculture Conference, 4-8 October 1983, Iloilo City, Philippines, 1984 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center; International Development Research Centre; Island Publishing House, Inc.
      The induced breeding of milkfish (Chanos chanos ) has been attempted by many institutes in the Philippines, Taiwan, Tahiti, Indonesia, and Hawaii. So far, a few successful trials have been achieved only in the Philippines and Taiwan, although different sources of spawners were used. In Taiwan the spawners used were reared from fry to sexual maturity in ponds and concrete tanks. This paper summarizes the gonadal development of captive milkfish at various stages of sexual maturation investigated from 1975 to 1980 and describes three successful trials of induced breeding in 1979, 1982, and 1983 in Taiwan. Finally, the problems that need further study are discussed.
    • magazineArticle

      Grow abalone in ponds 

      MT Castaños - SEAFDEC Asian Aquaculture, 1997 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
    • Conference paper

      The milkfish industry in Taiwan 

      CS Lee - In JV Juario, RP Ferraris & LV Benitez (Eds.), Advances in milkfish biology and culture: Proceedings of the Second International Milkfish Aquaculture Conference, 4-8 October 1983, Iloilo City, Philippines, 1984 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center; International Development Research Centre; Island Publishing House, Inc.
      This paper attempts to explain empirically the entire milkfish (Chanos chanos ) industry in Taiwan, convering 1) the gathering and marketing of milkfish fry - the procurement subsystem; 2) the production of milkfish fingerlings for the baitfish industry; 3) the production of market-size milkfish - the transformation subsystem; and 4) the marketing of market-size milkfish - the delivery subsystem. A constant elasticity of substitution production function is used to estimate the input-output relationship for baitfish and market-size production systems, with all inputs classified into labor and capital. An important finding is that the elasticity of substitution between labor and capital exceeds unity, indicating rather easy substitution between the two inputs in the milkfish industry in Taiwan. The area for aquaculture has expanded rapidly during the past two decades, but the milkfish production area has remained at 15,000 ha and yields have increased slowly compared with those of other cultured species.
    • Conference paper

      Research and training on fish diseases at the SEAFDEC Aquaculture Department in 2000-2004: A review 

      K Nagasawa - In CR Lavilla-Pitogo & K Nagasawa (Eds.), Transboundary Fish Diseases in Southeast Asia: Occurence, Surveillance, Research and Training. Proceedings of … Diseases in Southeast Asia: Occurence, Surveillance, Research and Training, Manila, Philippines, 23-24 June 2004, 2004 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
      This paper reviews various research and training activities on fish diseases at the Aquaculture Department of the Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center (SEAFDEC) in Iloilo, Philippines. The activities were implemented through the "Regional Fish Disease Project" of the Government of Japan Trust Fund starting in March 2000. A total of 29 research studies were conducted from 2000-2004 in the following aspects: (1) establishment and standardization of diagnostic methods; (2) biology and pathogenesis of disease pathogens; (3) disease prevention and control; (4) establishment of evaluation methods for residual chemicals in aquaculture products; and (5) epizootiology and prevention of koi herpesvirus disease. Some of these studies were conducted by scientists from the Department of Fisheries in Thailand, and from the Marine Fisheries Research Department (MFRD) of SEAFDEC in Singapore. Two sessions of hands-on training on "Important Viral Diseases of Shrimp and Marine Fish" was implemented in 2002 and 2003. Participants from the SEAFDEC member countries were funded by the project to attend the training course. The course consisted of both lecture and practical hands-on sessions. The latter focused on the use of molecular tools and other important techniques in the diagnosis of viral diseases of shrimp and marine fish. This review also provides information on publications such as proceedings, manuals, review articles, scientific papers, terminal report, annual reports, flyers, pamphlets and others as the outputs of research activities and international meetings that were organized with financial support from the project.
    • magazineArticle

      Stock enhancement in Japan and Taiwan 

      RIY Adan - SEAFDEC Asian Aquaculture, 2001 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
      Stock enhancement has been recognized as one of the essential strategies that can sustain and increase the resources of coastal fisheries. It has been practiced for over a century, with more than 100 species released to date in worldwide programs. Among the countries in Asia, Japan and Taiwan have already established the practice of stock enhancement. Details are given of the main species, number or seedstock produced and released in 1996 in Japan. The species released by the Taiwan Fisheries Research Institute 1976-1995 are also described.
    • Oral presentation

      Studies on the artificial insemination and fertilization of grass shrimp, Penaeus monodon. 

      MN Lin & YY Ting - In Y Taki, JH Primavera & JA Llobrera (Eds.), Proceedings of the First International Conference on the Culture of Penaeid Prawns/Shrimps, 4-7 December 1984, Iloilo City, Philippines, 1985 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
      The culture of grass shrimp, Penaeus monodon has become a fast-growing enterprise in Taiwan since formulated shrimp feed was successfully developed in 1978. In 1983, the total postlarval production for stocking reached 600 million at the price of 12.5 U.S. cents each. This high price of the postlarvae resulted from (1) limited availability of wild gravid females, (2) undesirable spawnings obtained by using the method of eyestalk ablation, manifested by a low average hatching rate of 20%, and (3) high demand from grow-out farms. The eyestalk ablated females induced to spawn were often found unmated which partly explained the poor spawnings and low hatching rates. Consequently, re-use of ablated females was not practised by farmers in the past.

      The present paper describes the results of artificial insemination and fertilization of wild or pond-reared females whose gonadal development was induced by eyestalk ablation. The hatching rates from unmated soft-thelycum females implanted with two spermatophores are 84.7% and 43.7% while those implanted with only one spermatophore, 74.1% and 16.8%, for the first and subsequent spawning, respectively. These results positively confirm that the unmated condition of ablated females is the main reason for low hatching. Through artificial insemination, the spawning and hatching can be improved and ablated females can be re-utilized. For unmated hard-thelycum females, artificial fertilization was done by releasing spermatozoa into the spawning tank right before spawning. Out of 15 attempts, three were successful with hatching rates of 63.1, 52.3, and 49.9%.

      Induced maturation of pond-reared shrimps was attempted by manipulation of temperature and salinity. Under constant temperature of 22±2°C, salinities ranging between 25 and 37 ppt were experimented. The best results with 67% success were obtained at salinities of 30 and 35 ppt. Continued efforts will be made to improve spawning performance through the technique of artificial insemination under controlled conditions.
    • Conference paper

      The use of chemicals in aquaculture in Taiwan, Province of China 

      IC Liao, JJ Guo & MS Su - In JR Arthur, CR Lavilla-Pitogo & RP Subasinghe (Eds.), Use of Chemicals in Aquaculture in Asia : Proceedings of the Meeting on the Use of Chemicals in Aquaculture in Asia 20-22 May 1996, Tigbauan, Iloilo, Philippines, 2000 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
      Aquaculture in Taiwan has a history of more than three centuries. To satisfy consumer preferences, a wide variety of aquatic species, 71 in 1993, are being cultured in Taiwan. It is difficult to control diseases when many species are cultured and stocking densities are high. At present, it is important to manage the use and application of chemotherapeutants effectively. Many aquatic animal diseases fall under the category of potentially curable illnesses. These include diseases of bacterial, protozoan, fungal, and environmental etiologies. This paper summarizes the chemicals used in aquaculture, farm management practices, alternative disease prevention methods, national regulations, and the current research on chemical use for aquaculture in Taiwan.