Now showing items 5-20 of 20

    • Conference paper

      Broodstock management and seed production of milkfish 

      CL Marte - In JV Juario & LV Benitez (Eds.), Seminar on Aquaculture Development in Southeast Asia, 8-12 September 1987, Iloilo City, Philippines, 1988 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
      Milkfish (Chanos chanos Forsskal) remains one of the cheapest sources of protein for developing countries in Southeast Asia, particularly in the Philippines. The unpredictable supply of wild fry, the only source of seed for the milkfish farmer, contributed largely to the slow growth of the milkfish industry. Research on the artificial propagation of this fish was, therefore, given emphasis.

      Major research achievements in milkfish breeding of the SEAFDEC Aquaculture Department in the last decade include: (1) successful induced spawning of wild and captive breeders using gonadotropin preparations and gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogues (GnRHa); (2) spontaneous maturation and spawning of captive breeders; (3) completion of the life cycle of milkfish in captivity; (4) development of a simple egg-collecting method; and (5) development of techniques for mass production of milkfish fry.

      Information on fry ecology and behavior, larval morphology and physiology were also gathered. These published data constitute the bulk of current knowledge on milkfish biology and natural history.

      Milkfish breeding technology is currently being pilot-tested in several breeding sites of the Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources (BFAR). Spontaneous maturation and spawning of milkfish have been verified in four sites which differ in environmental characteristics. The economic feasibility of producing milkfish fry and the socio-economic impact of artificial propagation of milkfish are now being assessed.
    • Conference paper

      Broodstock management and seed production of Penaeus monodon (Fabricius) 

      FD Parado-Estepa & J Honculada-Primavera - In JV Juario & LV Benitez (Eds.), Seminar on Aquaculture Development in Southeast Asia, 8-12 September 1987, Iloilo City, Philippines, 1988 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
      Research on the maturation of Penaeus monodon at AQD has focused on three broad areas, namely, reproductive biology and ecology, induced maturation and broodstock management. Studies on reproductive biology provided information on the life cycle, ovarian maturation stages, courtship and mating behavior, minimum size at sexual maturation (sperm occurrence, first spawning), and morphological egg types. Induced maturation has mainly been done through the eyestalk ablation method. Nutritional and environmental parameters were studied to enhance reproductive performance or as an alternative to ablation. Pond-reared and wild broodstock sources and marine pen and land-based tanks as maturation systems were also tested and compared. Size, shape, color, substrate material and other aspects of tank design and construction, sex ratio, stocking density, water management, and other parameters of the management system were also studied and refined.

      Early techniques in larval and postlarval rearing of P. monodon at AQD were based on the community culture method of growing natural food in larval tanks. However, low and inconsistent survival led to a shift in rearing methods toward pure phytoplankton culture grown in separate tanks as food for the larvae. Henceforth, refinement of rearing methods have been conducted to improve larval survival through effective water management, nutrition, and disease control. Efforts are continuously being geared toward making the technology affordable to Filipino farmers.
    • Conference paper

      Broodstock management and seed production of the rabbitfish Siganus guttatus (Bloch) and the sea bass Lates calcarifer (Bloch) 

      MN Duray & JV Juario - In JV Juario & LV Benitez (Eds.), Seminar on Aquaculture Development in Southeast Asia, 8-12 September 1987, Iloilo City, Philippines, 1988 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
      This paper reviews results of studies conducted on the rabbitfish, Siganus guttatus (Bloch) and the sea bass Lates calcarifer (Bloch) at the Aquaculture Department of the Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center. Studies include broodstock development and management, induced breeding, effect of handling stress and diet on egg quality, early life history, food, feeding strategy, weaning to artificial diets, effect of stocking density and salinity on egg development, larval growth and survival, and advancement of metamorphosis in sea bass by using thyroxine.

      A seed production technique had been developed for rabbitfish with survival rates ranging from 5-35% while the seed production technique for sea bass developed in Thailand had been modified to suit local conditions. Based on results from recent morphological and physiological studies, the stocking density, water management, and feeding scheme for the production of rabbitfish and sea bass fry had been modified to reduce cannibalism and improve survival.
    • Conference paper

      Broodstock management and seed production of tilapia and carp 

      AC Fermin - In JV Juario & LV Benitez (Eds.), Seminar on Aquaculture Development in Southeast Asia, 8-12 September 1987, Iloilo City, Philippines, 1988 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
      Bighead (Aristichthys nobilis) and silver (Hypophthalmichthys molitrix) carps were reared in ponds, pens and floating cages in Laguna Lake until maturity. Spontaneous gonadal maturation and rematuration of carp broodstock occurred within 2-2.5 years with average weight of 3-4 kg. Under lake conditions, broodstock were not given supplemental feeds. Induced spawning of gravid females was done by intraperitoneal injections using HCG combined with either common carp pituitary homogenates or LHRH-A. Stripping and dry-fertilization of eggs were done 6-8 hr after the final injection. Eggs were incubated in water containing 300-500 ppm Total Hardness. Fertilization and hatching rates were 23-88% and 7-36%, respectively. Post-larval carps were reared in tanks and fine-meshed nylon net cages installed in manured ponds. Tank-reared post-larvae were fed with Brachionus plicatilis and subsequently with Moina macrocopa in combination with powered formulated feeds containing 40% crude protein. Fry were harvested and stocked in nursery cages after 30-45 days of rearing in tanks.

      Four-month old 50-100 g tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) stocked in hapa net cages, tanks or ponds were used for breeding. Egg and fry production was significantly high at 4 females/m2 stocking density Different sex ratios, however, did not affect fry production. Spawning frequency and total growth of broodstock was highest in fry fed formulated diets containing 50% crude protein. Harvesting of fry was done every 15 days during summer months and every 21 days during cold months. Fry were reared in tanks and hapa cages and fed diets containing 35% crude protein. Supplemental feeding in the lake was suspended when productivity reached 3 gC/m2 /day.
    • Conference paper

      Development of aquaculture industry in Southeast Asia: An overview 

      HR Rabanal - In JV Juario & LV Benitez (Eds.), Seminar on Aquaculture Development in Southeast Asia, 8-12 September 1987, Iloilo City, Philippines, 1988 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
      Southeast Asia, a Subregion of the Asia-Pacific Region, is composed of countries of diverse socio-economic circumstances. Fisheries production, particularly that of the aquaculture sector, is relatively developed and is important to the economy of this area. Some 80 economic aquatic species are the subject of culture. Many of these species, which include fin fish, crustaceans, molluscs, and seaweeds, are produced in consequential quantities.

      Total production from the Subregion in 1983 amounted to about 880 000 mt which represented nine percent of total world aquaculture production in said year, and a 100% increase in the area within the decade (1975-1983). Unit production is comparatively low as it is usually done with the use of the extensive level of management developed after long years of experience by fish farmers. Higher rate of production in recent years is a trend especially for high value and exportable species like the penaeid shrimps. Aquaculture production tends to have accelerated growth while capture fisheries production tends to increase very gradually or levels off.

      Technical and non-technical constraints occur which hinder rapid progress of aquaculture in Southeast Asia. This will require the attention of research institutions and governments. However, bright prospects for future increase in production in this industry are developing in the area. Specific instances to support this forecast are discussed.
    • Conference paper

      Farming of mussels and oysters 

      HS Sitoy - In JV Juario & LV Benitez (Eds.), Seminar on Aquaculture Development in Southeast Asia, 8-12 September 1987, Iloilo City, Philippines, 1988 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
      This paper reviews the works on mussel and oyster culture conducted from 1975 to 1985 by the Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center Aquaculture Department at Tigbauan, Iloilo, Philippines. Innovative techniques developed in increasing collection of natural seeds and in improving farming techniques are presented. Results of the work on artificial seed production, bacterial depuration, uptake and elimination of heavy metals by green mussel, investigations on red tides, and microbiology of spoilage are discussed.
    • Conference paper

      Foreword 

      FJ Lacanilao - In JV Juario & LV Benitez (Eds.), Seminar on Aquaculture Development in Southeast Asia, 8-12 September 1987, Iloilo City, Philippines, 1988 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
    • Other

      List of participants and guest 

      JV Juario & LV Benitez (Eds.) - 1988 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
    • Conference paper

      Nursery and grow-out operation and management of milkfish 

      I Bombeo-Tuburan & DD Gerochi - In JV Juario & LV Benitez (Eds.), Seminar on Aquaculture Development in Southeast Asia, 8-12 September 1987, Iloilo City, Philippines, 1988 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
      This paper reviews the results of studies on the pond culture of milkfish Chanos chanos Forsskal at the SEAFDEC Leganes Brackishwater Station, Leganes, Iloilo since its establishment in 1973. Substantial contribution on the nursery system includes increased stocking density and survival through the use of nylon substrates, supplemental feeding with rice bran, the use of hatchery-reared and stunted fingerlings as alternative sources of stocks, and improvements in the acclimation process. Studies on monoculture and polyculture in grow-out ponds investigated the use of stunted fingerlings, kitchen or algal nursery ponds, stock manipulation techniques, increased stocking density using the plankton method, method frequency and quantity of fertilization, modular pond culture system, and initial findings on fish diseases. Constraints setting back increased production in the Philippines are discussed.
    • Conference paper

      Nursery and grow-out operation and management of Penaeus monodon (Fabricius) 

      KG Corre - In JV Juario & LV Benitez (Eds.), Seminar on Aquaculture Development in Southeast Asia, 8-12 September 1987, Iloilo City, Philippines, 1988 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
      The results of research on nursery and grow-out rearing of prawn conducted by the SEAFDEC Aquaculture Department for over a decade are reviewed. Different rearing facilities designed to accommodate hatchery-produced prawn fry are presented with corresponding data on growth, survival and production. Studies on stocking density, fertilization/natural food production, water management, feeds and feeding schemes and harvest/post-harvest handling are evaluated and viable technology identified. Diseases, pests and predators and other factors considered as production constraints are also mentioned.

      The success in hatchery operation for prawn coupled by the gradual emergence of nursery and grow-out rearing technology have triggered off a technology-dependent prawn industry. When SEAFDEC AQD was established in 1973, there were very few commercial prawn monoculture ventures in the country. Prawn pond production was mostly an incidental crop in milkfish culture. At present, various prawn grow-out techniques ranging from extensive, semi-intensive and intensive culture systems are in practice. SEAFDEC AQD focused its research on the extensive and semi-intensive culture systems which are within the reach of most farmers in contrast to the intensive system that is highly capital-intensive.

      There have been much work done in nursery and grow-out operations, but much remains to be done in research, among which are the development of nutritionally-efficient and low-cost feed, control of diseases, etc.
    • Conference paper

      Nursery and grow-out operation for tilapia and carp 

      MH Carlos & CB Santiago - In JV Juario & LV Benitez (Eds.), Seminar on Aquaculture Development in Southeast Asia, 8-12 September 1987, Iloilo City, Philippines, 1988 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
      Most researches conducted at the Binangonan Freshwater Station of the SEAFDEC Aquaculture Department were directed toward enhancing growth and survival of the young tilapia and carp in the nursery as well as increasing yields in grow-out cages, pens, and ponds. Studies included the culture and evaluation of phytoplankton and zooplankton as feeds of the tilapia and carp fry to fingerlings; determination of protein and amino acid requirements of young Nile tilapia; development of practical dry diets; evaluation of feeding regimes, feeding rates, and feeding frequencies ; and the use of fertilizers in nursery ponds.

      For the grow-out aspect, one of the earliest studies demonstrated the profitability of the monoculture of tilapia in cages which triggered the initial proliferation of tilapia cage culture by the private sector in areas near the Station. Subsequently, supplemental feeds were developed and evaluated; non-conventional feedstuffs were tested as feeds or feed components; and the growth rates of Nile tilapia fingerlings in cages at varying stocking densities were evaluated at three distinct rearing periods covering one year.

      Prior to the successful mass production of bighead carp fingerlings at the Station, studies on polyculture of tilapia, milk fish, and different species of carp were conducted in cages and pens with remarkable results. This led to the technology-verification projects on polyculture at various areas in Laguna Lake. With the availability of freshwater fishponds for research purposes, studies on polyculture in ponds were also conducted.
    • Book | Conference publication

      Perspectives in aquaculture development in Southeast Asia and Japan: proceedings of the Seminar on Aquaculture Development in Southeast Asia, Iloilo City, Philippines, 8-12 September 1987 

      JV Juario & LV Benitez (Eds.) - 1988 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
      This proceedings is a comprehensive account of the seminar and contains the papers read and discussed at the sessions, and the recommendations reached and formulated.
    • Conference paper

      The Philippine aquaculture industry 

      AS Camacho & N Macalincag-Lagua - In JV Juario & LV Benitez (Eds.), Seminar on Aquaculture Development in Southeast Asia, 8-12 September 1987, Iloilo City, Philippines, 1988 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
      The aquaculture sector of the Philippine fishing industry registered the highest growth rate of 12.5% in 1977-1986. The contribution of aquaculture to the total fish production was equivalent to 24% in 1986 compared to only 85 in the early 1970's. In terms of quantity, the mariculture subsector registered the highest growth rate of 10.2% in 1982-1986, whereas in terms of value the brackishwater fishpond subsector showed the highest growth rate of 33%. Meanwhile, freshwater aquaculture production exhibited a negative growth rate due to reduction of activities in Laguna de Bay and the slow expansion in hectarage of the commercial freshwater fishponds.

      Research by several agencies concentrated heavily on the culture of milkfish (Chanos chanos), tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus), Chinese carps (Aristichthys nobilis and Hypophthalmichthys molitrix), tiger prawn (Penaeus monodon), and sea bass (Lates calcarifer). Innovations in seaweed, oyster, and mussel farming are also discussed.

      Research directions are presented to assure an ecologically sustainable growth in aquaculture with emphasis on countryside development.
    • Other

      Preliminary pages 

      JV Juario & LV Benitez (Eds.) - 1988 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
      Cover page, title page and table of contents.
    • Conference paper

      Summary of workshop recommendations 

      JV Juario & LV Benitez (Eds.) - In JV Juario & LV Benitez (Eds.), Seminar on Aquaculture Development in Southeast Asia, 8-12 September 1987, Iloilo City, Philippines, 1988 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
      A special workshop among participants was conducted to assess the status of the aquaculture industry in Southeast Asia, particularly in Malaysia, Philippines, Singapore, and Thailand. Although hatchery, nursery, and grow-out culture techniques had already been developed for most of the economically important species cultured in Southeast Asia, the outcome of the workshop showed that there are still major constraints to be able to increase production. Further studies have to be conducted to have greater control of factors that lead to better production. The participants prioritized the economically important species and the research area for each species for the Region.
    • Conference paper

      Training programs of SEAFDEC Aquaculture Department 

      J Honculada-Primavera - In JV Juario & LV Benitez (Eds.), Seminar on Aquaculture Development in Southeast Asia, 8-12 September 1987, Iloilo City, Philippines, 1988 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
      With training as one of its three mandated functions, the SEAFDEC Aquaculture Department offered its first training course in 1974. Since then it has trained some 6 519 participants in various degree and non-degree programs. The degree courses are MS. Fisheries (Aquaculture) and M. Aquaculture in collaboration with the University of the Philippines in the Visayas.

      The non-degree programs include regular short-term courses, onsite seminars internship training and practicum for graduating students. The "hands-on" short-term courses cover Prawn Hatchery and Nursery, Marine Finfish Hatchery, Brackishwater Pond Culture, Sanitation and Culture of Bivalves, Freshwater Aquaculture, Aquaculture Management, Aquaculture Engineering, and Aquaculture for Social Scientists. A profile of 637 1982-1986 training participants show 82.3% from Southeast Asia, 79% male and 57.5% from government sector.

      The paper discusses planning and implementation of training programs, funding support (Japanese Government, International Development Research Centre of Canada, FAO Network of Aquaculture Centres in Asia), and future trends.