Now showing items 1-20 of 29

    • magazineArticle

      Tropical abalone culture in Philippines 

      AC Fermin - Global Aquaculture Advocate, 2001 - Global Aquaculture Alliance
    • magazineArticle

      Seed production of mud crab Scylla spp. 

      ET Quinitio, FD Parado-Estepa & E Rodriguez - Aquaculture Asia, 2002 - Network of Aquaculture Centers
      Mud crab farming is an important source of income for fish farmers in the Philippines. The expanding export market for mud crab as an alternative for shrimp has led to intensified collection of wild seed for grow-out and has threatened the wild stocks. To ensure the sustainability of crab farming and reduce the fishing pressure on wild stocks, the SEAFDEC Aquaculture Department developed a technology for large-scale production of juvenile mud crabs, Scylla serrata (giant mud crab), S. olivacea (orange mud crab) and S. tranquebarica (purple mud crab).
    • magazineArticle

      Seed production of the crucifix crab Charybdis feriatus 

      FD Parado-Estepa, ET Quinitio & EM Rodriguez - Aquaculture Asia, 2002 - Network of Aquaculture Centers
    • magazineArticle

      SEAFDEC AQD: Facilities and activities 

      RR Platon & WG Yap - World Aquaculture, 2002 - World Aquaculture Society
      As an R & D complex in aquaculture that can conduct replicated studies in marine waters, brackish water and freshwater, be it in aquaria, large tanks, earthen ponds or cages, there are not that many institutions in the world like the SEAFDEC Aquaculture Department (AQD). SEAFDEC AQD is one of four departments of the Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center, a regional treaty organization with headquarters in Bangkok, Thailand. Starting with six countries when the SEAFDEC treaty was signed in 1969, SEAFDEC now includes Brunei Darusalam, Cambodia, Indonesia, Japan, Malaysia, Myanmar, the Philippines, Singapore, Thailand and Vietnam. The other three SEAFDEC departments are the Training Department (TD) in Thailand, the Marine Fisheries Research Department (MFRD) in Singapore and the Marine Fishery Resources Development and Management Department (MFRDMD) in Malaysia. Among the four departments, the Aquaculture Department, established in 1973 and hosted by the government of the Philippines, is the largest.
    • magazineArticle

      Breeding and seed production of the mangrove red snapper 

      AC Emata - Aquaculture Asia, 2002 - Network of Aquaculture Centers
    • magazineArticle

      Seaweed production: Farming Kappaphycus in the Philippines 

      AQ Hurtado - Global Aquaculture Advocate, 2002 - Global Aquaculture Alliance
    • magazineArticle

      Retaining our mangrove greenbelt: Integrating mangroves and aquaculture 

      J Primavera - Fish for the People, 2004 - SEAFDEC Secretariat
      Although multilateral agencies in Southeast Asia have long been promoting that mangroves, and other wetlands, are wastelands to be put into better use, such as conversion to ponds. However, there is a need for Mangrove Friendly Aquaculture (MFA) technology in the intertidal forest, or swamp, which does not require the clearing of trees. MFA may be defined on 2 levels: 1) silvofisheries or aquasilviculture, where the low density culture of crabs, shrimps and fish is integrated with mangroves; and, 2) mangrove filters where mangrove forests are used to absorb the excess nutrients in the effluents from high-density culture ponds. A review is made of MFA practices belonging to the first category. Discussion is on a country basis, moving from traditional systems in Indonesia, to the introduced technologies in Indonesia, Vietnam, the Philippines and Malaysia. It is hoped that this review will be of use to scientists, aquaculturists, policy makers and governmental/NGOs interested in making aquaculture more ecologically sound and socially responsible.
    • magazineArticle

      DNA markers help manage Nile tilapia stocks 

      MRR Eguia & N Taniguchi - Global Aquaculture Advocate, 2006 - Global Aquaculture Alliance
      Determining changes in the genetic diversity of selected hatchery stocks through DNA-level polymorphisms analysis provides aquaculturists with a means to monitor inbreeding, control loss of genetic diversity, and achieve sustainable levels of genetic gain in the development of improved stocks. Tests with selected and domesticated tilapia stocks in the Philippines revealed variability between marker system results.
    • magazineArticle

      Towards sustainable aquaculture in the ASEAN region 

      RR Platon, WG Yap & VT Sulit - Fish for the People, 2007 - SEAFDEC Secretariat
    • magazineArticle

      Science and environment education: Aquaculture in focus 

      TU Bagarinao - Fish for the People, 2007 - SEAFDEC Secretariat
    • magazineArticle

      Sustainable tilapia farming: a challenge to rural development 

      JD Toledo, BO Acosta, MRR Eguia, RV Eguia & DC Israel - Fish for the People, 2008 - SEAFDEC Secretariat
      The availability of improved Nile tilapia strains is a major factor that has opened up new avenues for renewed growth in the tilapia industry especially in the rural sector. This was hailed as a positive development in the tilapia industry because it promised opportunities for improvement of the rural economy. Although this article discussed the development of tilapia aquaculture in the Philippines, other countries can learn from this experience specifically in addressing challenges related to rural development.
    • magazineArticle

      Mangroves or aquaculture? Why not both? 

      ET Aldon, RR Platon & VT Sulit - Fish for the People, 2008 - SEAFDEC Secretariat
      This article briefly summarizes the techniques developed, verified and/or refined during the implementation of the Project on the Promotion of Mangrove-Friendly Shrimp Aquaculture in Southeast Asia, which was implemented by the SEAFDEC Aquaculture Department from 2000 to 2005. Conducted under the ASEAN-SEAFDEC FCG collaborative mechanism, the project which received generous funding from the Government of Japan through its JTF Program, aimed to develop sustainable culture technology packages on shrimp farming that are friendly to mangroves and the environment.
    • magazineArticle

      The filter net [tangab] fishery in Iloilo Strait, Philippines: Food and livelihood for coastal communities in the midst of waste of non-target fishery resources 

      TU Bagarinao - Fish for the People, 2008 - SEAFDEC Secretariat
      The Philippines is home to a mixed of blessings: an enormous marine biodiversity, a tremendous variety of fishery enterprises, and about 50 million coastal residents who mostly fish and eat fish. So many animals and so many nets in the water result in huge total catches of target fishery species, but also unfortunately of ‘trash fish’ — huge numbers of diverse marine larvae, juveniles, small adults, and unwanted species.

      'Trash fish' is a category of fisheries bycatch, which as a whole has been estimated to average about 20% worldwide, but difficult to quantify in Philippine fisheries given the large number and variety of fishers, fishing grounds, gears, species, and markets. Moreover, it is difficult to quantify the costs and benefits of a given fishery, and in particular to balance the economic benefits to the coastal communities in terms of food and livelihood versus the ecological costs of catching (killing!) untold numbers of larvae, juveniles, and small adults of innumerable species. Qualitative information is readily available, however, and this article takes as example the case of the filter net or tangab fishery in Iloilo Strait in central Philippines. A typical tangab catch from Iloilo strait is a large mixture of small sizes of low-value and non-marketable species loaded from bagnets into many wooden boxes.
    • magazineArticle

      Application of GIS in shrimp disease surveillance and monitoring 

      CR Lavilla-Pitogo & JB Biñas - GIS Link, 2009 - National Mapping and Resource Information Authority
    • magazineArticle

      Sandfish: Profitable sea cucumbers also supply bioremediation 

      MT Castaños, RV Ledesma, KG Corre & EG de Jesus-Ayson - Global Aquaculture Advocate, 2011 - Global Aquaculture Alliance
      Sandfish, a type of sea cucumber, are both a high-value culture species and one that supports the aquaculture of other fish species by cleaning up waste on the bottoms of ponds or sea cages. Hatchery and nursery technologies for sandfish are being continuously refined by Vietnam’s Research Institute of Aquaculture No. 3, the Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center and their partners. These technologies have also been initially transferred to the private sector through a training course and manual.
    • magazineArticle

      Sandfish culture technology developed 

      M Castaños - Agriculture Magazine, 2011 - Manila Bulletin Publishing Corporation
    • magazineArticle

      Meeting social and economic challenges in Southeast Asian aquaculture: Targeting rural aquaculture development for poverty alleviation 

      ND Salayo, DB Baticados, EV Aralar & BO Acosta - Fish for the People, 2012 - SEAFDEC Secretariat
      In 2010, five Southeast Asian countries led by Vietnam and followed by Indonesia, Thailand, Myanmar, and the Philippines, have successfully joined the ranks of the world’s top 10 producers of food fish from aquaculture. Taking into account aquaculture production in general which includes seaweeds, the region’s production from aquaculture had contributed more than 45% to the region’s total fishery production, about 24% to the world’s production from aquaculture, and about 10% to the world’s total fishery production in 2010. As shown in the statistics reports, most of the aforementioned countries recorded double-digit growth rates in aquaculture production from 2006 to 2010, ranging from 18 to 62 percent. Another milestone in the fisheries sector of the region is the engagement of about 11 million people in aquaculture and its ancillary industries. In spite of these figures, the region’s rural areas where aquaculture development is taking giant strides remain the most impoverished groups in most countries of Southeast Asia. In an attempt to address this concern, SEAFDEC Aquaculture Department compiled the results of the implementation of its program on Meeting Social and Economic Challenges in Aquaculture which had been tried in local setting in the Philippines, with the objective of developing aquaculture technology adoption pathways that could be promoted in the other Southeast Asian countries with the same conditions as those in study sites in the Philippines, as means of alleviating poverty in rural areas.
    • magazineArticle

      Unifying the art, science and business of aquaculture through the information resources and services of SEAFDEC Aquaculture Department Library 

      SB Alayon, DL Superio, JG de la Peña & ES Nemiz - Fish for the People, 2013 - Secretariat, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
      Established in 1973 in Tigbauan, Iloilo, Philippines, the Aquaculture Department (AQD) is one of four Departments of the Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center (SEAFDEC). AQD is mandated to conduct scientific research to generate aquaculture technologies relevant and appropriate for the region; develop human resources; and produce, disseminate and exchange information on aquaculture. AQD is committed to sustainable development and the responsible stewardship of aquaculture resources through science-based research and the promotion of appropriate technologies and information relevant to the Southeast Asian region (SEAFDEC/AQD, 2009). The need to disseminate AQD’s research results is as important as the conduct of research in fisheries and aquaculture as referred to in the Code of Conduct for Responsible Fisheries (Wilkinson and Collins, 2007). In cognizance of the role that AQD should play with respect to its function of disseminating and exchanging information on aquaculture, the AQD Library was established to support the information needs of AQD scientists and staff. In addition, the Library also provides services to visiting researchers, local and international trainees and students, as well as the diverse users from AQD’s partner institutions. During the strategic planning workshop conducted by AQD in 2009, one of the goals identified was for AQD to strengthen the capacities of the aquaculture sector. Matching with such goal, the Library and Data Banking Services Section of the Training and Information Division identified its information dissemination and services target for 2012. Primarily, AQD Library aims to improve accessibility to archived and updated information, and to create a digital library collection of AQD publications and documents. In keeping up its goal of providing quality, current and relevant information, the Library continues to avail of quality print and non-print information resources, to ensure that it keeps abreast of the advancements in aquaculture and fulfil the diverse information needs of users. The Library also introduces innovations in its services with the purpose of unifying the art, science and business of aquaculture, and strengthens its local and international linkages for efficient sharing of knowledge and resources.