Now showing items 1-6 of 6

    • Conference paper

      ASEAN-SEAFDEC directives related to species of international concern 

      S Vichitlekarn - In JH Primavera, ET Quinitio & MR Eguia (Eds.), Proceedings of the Regional Technical Consultation on Stock Enhancement for Threatened Species of International Concern, Iloilo City, Philippines, 13-15 July 2005, 2006 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
      To achieve sustainable fisheries for food security in the ASEAN region, the Resolution (RES) and Plan of Action (POA) urge the Member Countries to rectify their fisheries practices through improvement of existing fisheries management policy, framework and practices as well as implementation of the Code of Conduct for Responsible Fisheries (CCRF), RES and POA. Improvement of fisheries management includes the gradual introduction of decentralized rights-based fisheries and co-management systems, regulation/control of fishing activities, protection/rehabilitation of important aquatic resource habitats, resource/stock enhancement, and so on. In addition, the RES and POA also highlight the need to enhance partnership among Member Countries in the region through the formulation of common positions as well as to increase their participation and involvement in international fora (FAO, CITES, etc.) to safeguard and promote ASEAN interests particularly on issues of international concern. In line with the above general directives, especially in relation to stock enhancement of species under international concern, senior fisheries officials of ASEAN and SEAFDEC have urged proactive approaches in tackling the issues and gave the following directives: 1) To increase support to national initiatives and to facilitate regional cooperation on stock enhancement including identification of concerned species and their status, interaction between concerned species and fishing, and integrated approach and community involvement in management and conservation of aquatic resources; 2) To identify issues/species of international concern and conduct review on status of the issues/species as basis for formulation of fisheries policy as well as common positions among the Member Countries in international fora; 3) To compile information on status and initiatives related to management and conservation of aquatic resources and to disseminate them in appropriate international fora to enhance awareness of the regional situation and seriousness of the issues; 4) To promote appropriate inter-agency coordination on the issues at national and regional levels, and 5) To promote involvement of national fisheries agencies in national/regional/international fora/mechanisms related to utilization and management of aquatic resources.
    • Conference paper

      Community-based stock enhancement of topshell in Honda Bay, Palawan, Philippines 

      BJ Gonzales, WM Galon & JG Becira - In JH Primavera, ET Quinitio & MR Eguia (Eds.), Proceedings of the Regional Technical Consultation on Stock Enhancement for Threatened Species of International Concern, Iloilo City, Philippines, 13-15 July 2005, 2006 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
      In Palawan, Philippines, observed reduction of trochus shell resource in various areas was due to unregulated harvest mainly by compressor (hookah) divers and free diving fishers from other provinces. The latter migrate to Honda Bay for greater livelihood prospects (Gonzales, 2004), increasing the population of coastal communities along the Bay. According to fishers in Honda Bay, their shellfish resources were bountiful until traders and divers from other parts of the country came to Palawan in the 1970s, depleting topshell Trochus niloticus and other species. One of the objectives of Coastal Resource Management (CRM) is the regeneration of depleted resources and their sustainable use. On the other hand, the socio-economic objectives are: a) to alleviate poverty in coastal communities through added income and, b) to encourage responsible use of coastal resources through active participation of coastal communities in decision-making, planning, and implementation. The community-based topshell stock enhancement in Barangay Binduyan was assisted by the Fisheries Resource Management Project (FRMP) of the Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources of the Department of Agriculture (DA-BFAR). The objectives of this paper are to: 1) describe the processes in a community-managed stock enhancement project; 2) document monitoring and evaluation of the project; and 3) give recommendations to improve future community-managed stock enhancement project.
    • Conference paper

      Fishery stock enhancement in Malaysia 

      K Ibrahim & Z Ilias - In JH Primavera, ET Quinitio & MR Eguia (Eds.), Proceedings of the Regional Technical Consultation on Stock Enhancement for Threatened Species of International Concern, Iloilo City, Philippines, 13-15 July 2005, 2006 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
      Species extinction is a global issue that requires all nations to practice sustainable management. This paper aims to examine the status of endangered fisheries species in Malaysia, and highlight some resource management initiatives including the restocking and stock enhancement program in the country. Its scope covers only aquaculture-based species, which is in line with the Program on Stock Enhancement for Species of International Concern being implemented by the Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center/Aquaculture Department in the Philippines.
    • Conference publication | Book

      Proceedings of the Regional Technical Consultation on Stock Enhancement for Threatened Species of International Concern, Iloilo City, Philippines, 13-15 July 2005 

      JH Primavera, ET Quinitio & MR Eguia - 2006 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
      This 150-page book documents the proceedings of an experts' consultation held at AQD in July 2005. It contains nine review papers and seven country papers.
    • Conference paper

      Status and prospects of aquaculture of threatened echinoderms in the Philippines for stock enhancement and restocking 

      MFJ Nievales, MA Juinio-Meñez & HG Bangi - In JH Primavera, ET Quinitio & MR Eguia (Eds.), Proceedings of the Regional Technical Consultation on Stock Enhancement for Threatened Species of International Concern, Iloilo City, Philippines, 13-15 July 2005, 2006 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
      Echinoderms are either specifically targeted by gleaners and divers, or form part of the multispecies invertebrate fishery in many coastal areas in the Philippines. The existence of a local sea urchin market in northern Philippines (e.g., Pangasinan, La Union) benefits many coastal families that depend on this fishery for subsistence. In Bolinao, Pangasinan, over 40 families are reportedly dependent on this fishery. Major sea urchin species collected include Tripneustes gratilla, Diadema spp. and Salmacis spp. In the case of holothurian fishery, with over a century of fishery history for holothurians, at least 25 species mostly belonging to the families Holothuriidae and Stichopodidae are commercially important (Schoppe 2000). While there may be local consumption of both fresh and dried products, the latter are largely exported. Echinoderm fishery is dependent on wild stock. The high demand far exceeding supply, good global market prices and their biology (e.g., slow mobility, shallow water benthic habitat) render them vulnerable to overexploitation. The contribution of echinoderm products to the Philippine economy is substantial. The relative contribution of echinoderm products to the income and socio-economic well-being of fisherfolk who collect these invertebrates is undocumented. However, it has been noted that middlemen, especially local buyers who sell trepang in Manila and Manila-based traders-exporters monopolize the profits (F. Nievales, unpublished data). Products from both echinoderm groups remain in short supply in the country and so trading, limited only by declining natural stock, continues to be lucrative.
    • Conference paper

      Thailand's concerns in endangered species and stock enhancement 

      M Chaengkij - In JH Primavera, ET Quinitio & MR Eguia (Eds.), Proceedings of the Regional Technical Consultation on Stock Enhancement for Threatened Species of International Concern, Iloilo City, Philippines, 13-15 July 2005, 2006 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
      The paper provides a comprehensive list of endangered freshwater, brackishwater, and marine aquatic species in Thailand. The Thai Department of Fisheries is breeding some of the endangered species under the “Rehabilitation of Thai Local Fishes and Aquatic Animals Project.” Some of these species are bred for restocking in the wild.