This collection contains the publications of SEAFDEC/AQD and its researchers including books, conference proceedings, aquaculture extension manuals, laboratory manuals, state of the art series, textbooks, monographs, code of practice, regional guidelines, posters, flyers, reports, translations, historical documents, in-house newsletter, and others. To view our new publications, please visit SEAFDEC/AQD Bookstore. To obtain the hard copy edition of a publication, send to bookstore@seafdec.org.ph a completed order form, or mail to AQD Bookstore, SEAFDEC Aquaculture Department, Tigbauan 5021, Iloilo, Philippines or fax it to +63 33 511 8709.

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  • Conference paper

    Development of protocol for the production of hatchery-reared mud crab Scylla serrata juveniles for soft-shell crab farming 

    ET Quinitio, GX Libunao & FD Parado-Estepa - In ET Quinitio, FD Parado-Estepa & RM Coloso (Eds.), Philippines : In the forefront of the mud crab industry development : proceedings of the 1st National Mud Crab Congress, 16-18 November 2015, Iloilo City, Philippines, 2017 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
    Development of economically viable techniques for growing hatchery-reared juvenile crabs to suitable sizes will address the problem on the source of seed stocks for soft-shell crab farming. This paper reports the production of hatchery-reared mud crab Scylla serrata from juveniles in the nursery to 73-106 g body weight (BW) crabs in the grow-out pond for the individual system soft-shell crab farming. Likewise, the performance of hatchery-reared S. serrata, and wild S. tranquebarica and S. olivacea juveniles was determined in the soft-shell crab production set-up.

    The BW increased from 1.8-1.9 g to 78-113.7 g when stocked at 0.5 ind m-2 and from 1.6-2.3 g to 73-106.7 g at 1.0 ind m-2 after 75 days. Growth rates at both stocking densities were comparable. However, survival was significantly higher (P<0.05) in lower (63.6~c1.01%) than in higher (35.6~c3.34%) stocking density. Male S. serrata (46.0 ~c 1.75%) had significantly higher BW increase than females (39.4 ~c 2.05%). Crabs stocked at sizes of 51-60 g showed significantly greater percent increase in BW (43.26~c 0.98%) compared with those at 61-70 g (40.98~c1.33%), 71-80 g (38.55~c 1.04%), 81-90 g (36.34 ~c 1.27%) and 91-100 g (38.52 ~c 1.67%). Among the three species, hatchery-reared S. serrata (42.14 ~c 1.34%) had significantly higher mean percent BW increase compared with S. olivacea (38.23 ~c 0.49%) and S. tranquebarica (36.16 ~c 0.78%). S. serrata had significantly shorter mean culture period (24.11 ~c 0.95 days) than S. tranquebarica (28.48 ~c 0.54 days) and S. olivacea (28.75 ~c 0.34 days).
  • Conference paper

    Strategies to reduce disease incidence in mud crab culture 

    EC Amar, MD Somera, SB Madero, EA Tendencia & JP Faisan Jr. - In ET Quinitio, FD Parado-Estepa & RM Coloso (Eds.), Philippines : In the forefront of the mud crab industry development : proceedings of the 1st National Mud Crab Congress, 16-18 November 2015, Iloilo City, Philippines, 2017 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
    Mud crab hatchery suffers from low survival due to susceptibility to bacterial infection in the early larval stages among many causes. Despite food safety issues, antibiotics continue to be used in the absence of effective alternatives. In this study, screening of plant extracts was conducted to determine their suitability as antimicrobial agents against pathogens causing low survival in the hatchery. In addition, potential probionts were isolated from the gastrointestinal tract of mud crab, and water and sediments of mud crab grow-out ponds.

    Crude ethanolic extracts from various terrestrial and mangrove trees were tested for in vitro antimicrobial activity and toxicity to mud crab zoea and megalopa. In addition, the in vivo antimicrobial efficacies of the selected extracts were tested by oral administration followed by experimental challenge with Vibrio harveryi. On the other hand, the putative probionts, were tested for pathogenicity against mud crab zoea and megalopa and quorum sensing inhibition activity against V. harveyi. Finally the extracts and probionts were tested for their efficacy in simulated hatchery and grow-out trials.

    Results showed that extracts of Terminalia cattapa and the potential probiont Bacillus subtilis G100R11 showed antimicrobial and probiotic activity in in vitro and in vivo tests. In simulated hatchery trials, T. cattapa administration successfully produced crab instar with a survival of 1.3-1.8% in trials 1 and 2 comparable to antibiotic control. B. subtilis produced crab instar with survival of 0.8-1.0% in trials 1 and 2, better than the commercial probiotic with 0-0.13% survival. Using T. cattapa and B. subtilis, survival was above 30% until zoea 5 but suddenly dropped below 5% during metamorphosis to megalopa where high incidence of incomplete molting was observed. If difficulty affecting the molting process is addressed, high survival from zoea to megalopa and crab instar will be achievable.
  • Conference paper

    Pilot scale production of pellets suitable for mud crab Scylla serrata 

    RM Coloso, MR Catacutan, JP Peralta, JG Genodepa, K Duno & R Gardoce - In ET Quinitio, FD Parado-Estepa & RM Coloso (Eds.), Philippines : In the forefront of the mud crab industry development : proceedings of the 1st National Mud Crab Congress, 16-18 November 2015, Iloilo City, Philippines, 2017 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
    Studies were conducted towards the pilot scale production of stable and nutritionally adequate pellets suitable for mud crab Scylla serrata to help in efforts to increase mud crab production in the Philippines. Preliminary studies showed that mud crabs preferred pellets which were spherical or cylindrical and contained marine based attractants. Two practical diets were formulated and prepared in the Pilot Feed Mill of SEAFDEC/AQD. The extruded diets, along with a commercial mud crab grow-out diet, were subjected to proximate and Ca/P analyses as well as cholesterol analysis and water stability tests. The diets were fed to crabs in a controlled laboratory experiment using fiberglass tanks with flow-through, aerated seawater, and monitored from initial molt (M0) up to the second molt (M2). Tests revealed that the crabs fed Diet 1 (CP 48.28 %, CF 7.74 %, Ca 5.23%, P 12.93 %, cholesterol 0.173 %) showed the highest growth and better survival than those fed Diet 2 or commercial diet. Crabs fed Diet 1 took a shorter time to attain two molt cycles from M0. Survival was 70% after M2. Diet 1 was water stable within two hours. Abnormalities were observed including absent swimming legs or chelae, exposed gills, sores on exoskeleton, incomplete molting, or soft exoskeleton, but none that could be directly attributed to a specific treatment. Incomplete molting and slow hardening of the exoskeleton in crabs that accounted for the mortalities could be due to the low cholesterol levels in the diets especially in the commercial diet which had the lowest cholesterol level. Cholesterol supplementation of the artificial diet would be needed to improve molting success and survival of mud crabs in grow-out culture. The results of these experiments will be used to formulate a cost-effective grow-out diet for mud crab (supported by DOST-PCAARRD Grant in Aid).
  • Conference paper

    Development of immunostimulant for mud crab, Scylla serrata 

    RF Traifalgar - In ET Quinitio, FD Parado-Estepa & RM Coloso (Eds.), Philippines : In the forefront of the mud crab industry development : proceedings of the 1st National Mud Crab Congress, 16-18 November 2015, Iloilo City, Philippines, 2017 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
    Non-specific immune activitation is considered a potential prophylactic approach in the prevention of disease outbreaks in crustacean aquaculture. The present investigation evaluates the dietary supplementation of bacterial and algal derived immunostimulants including peptidoglycan, ergosan, mannan oligosaccharide and acidic polysaccharides from Ulva, Sargassum and Padina to enhance the immunological responses and resistance of Scylla serrata juveniles against white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) infection. Each of the test immunostimulant was optimized for dose and frequency of administration.

    Results showed significant enhancement of shrimp survival against WSSV infection if Mannan oligosaccharide is supplemented at 2000 mg kg-1 diet applied every 3 days. Optimum dose and frequency of application for peptidoglycan was determined as 1000 mg kg-1 diet applied every 3 days while a dose of 2000 mg kg-1 diet applied every 3 days was found optimum for ergosan. Enhancement of survival was also observed in crabs given the acidic polysaccharide extracts from seaweeds. Better survival was observed in the treatment receiving Ulva at 1000 mg kg-1 applied every 3 days. Similar dose and frequency were also observed to enhance the resistance of the juvenile crabs against WSSV when maintained with diets supplemented with Padina and Sargassum acidic polysaccharides. The high survival in these treatments is associated with the prominent enhancement of immunological responses including phenol oxidase activity, respiratory burst and total hemocyte counts. At optimum dosage and application frequency, these immunostimulants are observed to improve overall growth performance of the juvenile crab. These results suggest that dietary supplementation of peptidoglycan, ergosan mannan oligosaccharide, and acidic polysaccharides from Ulva, Sargassum and Padina at a dose described above can be used to boost the immunological response and enhance the resistance of S. serrata juveniles against WSSV infection.
  • Conference paper

    Handling, storage and transport conditions of mud crabs in trading centers 

    JP Peralta & JPD Chan - In ET Quinitio, FD Parado-Estepa & RM Coloso (Eds.), Philippines : In the forefront of the mud crab industry development : proceedings of the 1st National Mud Crab Congress, 16-18 November 2015, Iloilo City, Philippines, 2017 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
    This study aims to improve the handling, storage and transport conditions of mud crabs. The usual practice of the crab growers in the Philippines is to bring the market size crabs to middlemen, brokers or operators of small trading centers immediately after harvest; then the crabs are brought to municipal traders or operators of bigger buying station. The crabs are sent to the exporters in Manila or Cebu. The crabs are exported mostly to Singapore, Taiwan, Hongkong and mainland China. The crabs are classified based on the species, body weight, sex, gonad maturity and intactness of limbs. Crabs are rejected for export when they are soft-shelled, very lean, or have incomplete limbs and abnormalities. Crabs with emaciated muscle (‘hagas’), ammoniacal odor (strong urine-like smell) and in an undesirable state are also rejected.

    This paper presents the initial results of the project on the Improvement in the handling, storage and transport of mud crabs under Sub-program C entitled Improvement of Feeds and Stock Management Practices in Mud Crab Grow-out Culture under the National Mud Crab Science and Technology Program. It also presents issues and concerns on the present practices, and presents possible recommendations.
  • Conference paper

    Defects in the handling, storage and transport of mud crab 

    JP Peralta & DS Cheung - In ET Quinitio, FD Parado-Estepa & RM Coloso (Eds.), Philippines : In the forefront of the mud crab industry development : proceedings of the 1st National Mud Crab Congress, 16-18 November 2015, Iloilo City, Philippines, 2017 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
    Consumers prefer to buy live mud crabs (Scylla). Moribund and dead crabs have very low market value. Immediately after harvest, the crabs are tied to render their claws immobile. The time between harvest and arrival of crabs at the final destination is 3-5 days. During the holding and transport period, the crabs are no longer fed and are sometimes subjected to stressful conditions (e.g. high temperature) which may result to weight loss, muscle emaciation and other undesirable conditions of the crabs, and mortality. Likewise, ammoniacal odor (strong urine-like smell) that affects flavor is sometimes observed. Crabs with emaciated muscle and undesirable odor are considered rejects.

    This paper presents the initial results of the project on the Improvement in the Handling, Storage and Transport of Mud Crabs under Sub-program C entitled Improvement of Feeds and Stock Management Practices in Mud Crab Grow-out Culture under the National Mud Crab Science and Technology Program.
  • Conference paper

    Polyculture of mud crab in Region 3 

    M Bonifacio - In ET Quinitio, FD Parado-Estepa & RM Coloso (Eds.), Philippines : In the forefront of the mud crab industry development : proceedings of the 1st National Mud Crab Congress, 16-18 November 2015, Iloilo City, Philippines, 2017 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
    The polyculture of mud crab with one to three other species (milkfish (Chanos chanos), tilapia (Oreochromis spp.) and shrimp or sugpo (Penaeus monodon)) is a common practice in Region 3. Pond preparation is given importance prior to stocking of various species. Removal of sludge in the pond and application of probiotics are included in the standard pond preparation. The size and stocking densities of each species vary depending on the season. The volume of water to be replaced is based on the transparency of the water.

    The various species are fed natural food grown in the pond in addition to mollusks and low value fish given specifically for mud crab and shrimp. When pond water becomes transparent (indicating the decrease in phytoplankton density), the water is agitated using a small boat. If water continues to be transparent, fertilizers are applied to enhance growth of natural food. The pond water and animals are closely monitored to prevent diseases. Some of the early signs of occurrence of disease include the presence of bubbles on the water surface, and presence of weak shrimp on the feeding trays and along the dikes. The presence of weak shrimp and crab on the pond bottom and continuous swimming of these animals from night to dawn indicate poor pond water quality which can be remedied by circulating and flushing of the pond water every other day.
  • Conference paper

    Management strategies for grow-out culture of mud crab 

    JG Genodepa - In ET Quinitio, FD Parado-Estepa & RM Coloso (Eds.), Philippines : In the forefront of the mud crab industry development : proceedings of the 1st National Mud Crab Congress, 16-18 November 2015, Iloilo City, Philippines, 2017 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
    There is an increasing interest in mud crab farming because of the growing demand for mud crab in domestic and international markets. Different methods for rearing crabs in ponds, pens and cages have evolved through several years of research and experiences of farmers. Mud crabs are cultured in brackishwater earthen ponds and pens in mangroves. Fattening of lean crabs is also integrated with the grow-out culture system. Cannibalism is one of the major factors affecting the survival of crabs in growout ponds and pens. Hence, various strategies are recommended to reduce cannibalism such as stocking density of less than 2,000 crabs ha-1, provision of suitable shelters, sufficient quantity of natural food and formulated feeds that are evenly distributed in the pond or pen. Feeding rate used in the pen is adjusted to avoid excess feeds that can attract rats and other land animals that can damage the enclosures. Selective harvesting is normally practiced since mud crabs do not grow or get fattened at the same time even if they belong to the same batch.
  • Conference paper

    Growth, survival, proximate and fatty acid composition of sandworm Perinereis quatrefagesi (Grube, 1878) fed variable feed types 

    JB Biñas, VR Alava & WL Campos - In ET Quinitio, FD Parado-Estepa & RM Coloso (Eds.), Philippines : In the forefront of the mud crab industry development : proceedings of the 1st National Mud Crab Congress, 16-18 November 2015, Iloilo City, Philippines, 2017 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
    Sandworm Perinereis quatrefagesi has been used as feed for crustacean broodstock due to its reproductive-enhancing properties particularly protein and highly unsaturated fatty acids (HUFAs). Juvenile sandworms collected along the coast of Guimbal, Iloilo were reared in tanks and fed three nutritionally variable feed types: fish fecal waste, fish meal and rice bran. After 56 days, feeds affected (p<0.05) sandworm growth and crude fat contents but not (p<0.05) survival and crude protein levels. Survival rates were 86~c3 to 89~c5% while crude protein levels were 57.0 ~c 2.5 to 68.0 ~c 5.3 g 100 g-1 dry weight. High crude protein fish meal promoted better (p<0.05) growth (2.2~c0.4% day-1) than fish feces (1.2~c0.3% day-1) and rice bran (1.1~c0.3 % day-1). However, crude fat content of sandworm was higher (p<0.05) in rice bran (18.9~c1.6 g 100 g-1) than in fecal waste (13.6~c2.9 g 100 g-1) and fish meal (10.5~c3.1 g 100 g-1) treatments. Levels of highly unsaturated fatty acids (HUFAs) such as 20:4 n-6, 22:6 n-3 and 20:5 n-3 did not differ significantly (p>0.05) at 0.41~c0.21 to 0.89~c0.51 g 100 g-1, 0.21~c0.24 to 0.43~c0.22 g 100 g-1 and 0.57~c0.46 to 0.88~c0.31 g 100 g-1, respectively.

    The study demonstrated that P. quatrefagesi: (1) can survive well in nutritionally variable feed types although it grows better in high protein diet; (2) crude protein levels were high regardless of feed types; and (3) crude fat content was high in high fat diet but n-3 and n-6 HUFAs were not significantly different regardless of feed types.
  • Conference paper

    Morphological deformities in mud crab Scylla serrata juveniles exposed to antibiotics during the larval stage 

    GS Pates Jr., ET Quinitio, GF Quinitio & FD Parado-Estepa - In ET Quinitio, FD Parado-Estepa & RM Coloso (Eds.), Philippines : In the forefront of the mud crab industry development : proceedings of the 1st National Mud Crab Congress, 16-18 November 2015, Iloilo City, Philippines, 2017 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
    The effects of antibiotics on the survival, growth and external deformities of mud crab Scylla serrata larvae and juveniles were determined. Zoeae were exposed to 0, 3, 6, 9, 12 mgL-1 oxytetracycline (OTC) and 0, 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2 mgL-1 furazolidone (furan) until the late megalopa in the first and second experiments. The treatments that gave the best results in the first and second experiments were conducted simultaneously in the third experiment. The surviving crab instar from each replicate were grown in nursery tanks for one month.

    Significantly higher survival and faster growth rate of Z5 were attained when 3 and 6 mgL-1 OTC or 0.5 and 1 mgL-1 furan were used. Morphological deformities observed in zoea 5 were bent dorsal, rostral and furcal spines. Percentage occurrence of morphological deformities was similar in all treatments. Significantly (P<0.05) higher survival and faster growth were attained among Z5 in the treatments using 3 mgL-1 OTC and 0.5 mL-1 furan in the third experiment. Morphological deformities observed in juveniles were fused frontal and lateral spines, asymmetrical and depressed tip of abdominal flap and gap between sternites. High percentage of deformities was observed in juveniles that were previously exposed to 6 mgL-1 OTC or 1.0 mgL-1 furan. There was no significant difference (P>0.05) observed in the survival of juveniles in both treatments of OTC and furan. However, growth was significantly (P<0.05) faster in lower concentrations of the two antibiotics.

    The study shows the apparent negative effects of antibiotics and highlights the need to eliminate or find alternatives, thereby preventing possible harm to the organisms and the environment.
  • Conference paper

    Nursery culture of mud crab Scylla serrata fed diets supplemented with trytophan at two stocking densities 

    VR Alava, MA Lucero, JD Sumile & FD Parado-Estepa - In ET Quinitio, FD Parado-Estepa & RM Coloso (Eds.), Philippines : In the forefront of the mud crab industry development : proceedings of the 1st National Mud Crab Congress, 16-18 November 2015, Iloilo City, Philippines, 2017 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
    Cannibalism has been recognized as one of the major problems in crab culture. The use of dietary tryptophan (TRP) that has been reported to reduce cannibalism in crabs under laboratory conditions was verified in pond nursery culture at two stocking densities. The first phase used hatchery-produced early crab instar. After 3-4 weeks, survivors were sorted and the small size crabs were further reared in the second phase. Crabs were stocked in 12-m2 net cages installed in brackishwater pond and fed three times daily at 0830, 1300 and 1630 h. The feeding scheme used was a combination of mussel meat (M) and formulated diet (FD) at 30:70 ratio. The original FD contained 45% crude protein (used in Experiment 1, 2 and 3) that was lowered to 40% crude protein in the new basal diet used in the succeeding experiment. The two TRP-supplemented diets had 0.5% and 0.7% TRP levels. Results showed that the TRP-supplemented feeds did not give consistent results in terms of growth and feed conversion ratio, indicating that the original basal diet (0.4% TRP and 45% crude protein) or the new basal diet (0.4% TRP and 40% crude protein) were sufficient to be used together with mussel meat as feed for crab juveniles. Higher survival rates were obtained at 50 m-2 (phase 1) and 10 m-2 (phase 2) than at 30 m-2 and 5 m-2 stocking density, respectively. All trial runs produced positive returns on investment.
  • Conference paper

    Induction of molting in hatchery-reared mud crab Scylla serrata juveniles through temperature manipulation or autotomy 

    JJDC Huervana - In ET Quinitio, FD Parado-Estepa & RM Coloso (Eds.), Philippines : In the forefront of the mud crab industry development : proceedings of the 1st National Mud Crab Congress, 16-18 November 2015, Iloilo City, Philippines, 2017 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
    The effects of water temperature and autotomy of chelipeds on growth, survival and molting of mud crab, Scylla serrata, juveniles were investigated under laboratory conditions in separate experiments. Hatchery-produced crabs at the intermolt stage with 2.0-2.3 cm carapace width and 1.7-2.2 g body weight were either exposed to temperature levels of 29, 32 and 35°C and ambient temperature of 24-31°C or subjected to autotomy (voluntary removal of one or two chelipeds). The crabs were allowed to molt twice prior to termination.

    All crabs held at 35°C had 100% mortality due to incomplete molting during the first molt. The mean survival of crabs upon termination was 58, 64 and 50% for ambient temperature, 29 and 32°C, respectively. Specific growth rate (SGR) of crabs in the ambient (2.83 ± 0.12%) and 29°C (3.02 ± 0.15%) were comparable but significantly lower than (P<0.01) those at 32°C (3.85 ± 0.28%). The molt interval of crabs was significantly shorter in treatments with constant water temperature (29°C: 32 ± 0.80 days, 32°C: 28 ± 1.11 days) compared to ambient temperature (39 ± 0.93 days).

    The survival of crabs with intact chelipeds (51.17 ± 3.56%) was comparable to those with one (50.55 ± 2.36%) or two (43.41 ± 1.59%) autotomized chelipeds. Juveniles with intact (5.80 ± 0.47%) or one autotomized cheliped (5.45 ± 0.30%) had a significantly higher SGR than crabs with both chelipeds autotomized (4.20 ± 0.52%) in the first molt. On the second molt, however, high SGR was observed in crabs with two chelipeds autotomized. The molt interval was significantly shorter in the autotomized crabs (one cheliped: 28 ± 1.66 days; two chelipeds: 23 ± 0.63 days) compared to those with intact chelipeds (36 ± 1.52 days). The results suggest that optimum water temperature for rearing S. serrata juveniles ranges from 29 to 32°C. Likewise, autotomy of one cheliped can promote molting without adversely affecting the growth and survival of the juveniles.
  • Conference paper

    Evaluation of the bioremediation capacity of the polychaete, Marphysa mossambica (Peters, 1854) in pond sediments 

    MAE Mandario, VR Alava & NC Anasco - In ET Quinitio, FD Parado-Estepa & RM Coloso (Eds.), Philippines : In the forefront of the mud crab industry development : proceedings of the 1st National Mud Crab Congress, 16-18 November 2015, Iloilo City, Philippines, 2017 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
    Marphysa mossambica is commonly found in brackishwater ponds and is an important natural food for cultured stocks particularly mud crabs. To understand the burrowing activity of polychaete, survival and capacity to bioremediate pond sediments, tank experiments were conducted. In a completely randomized design with three replicates per treatment, small (1-month old, 28 mg) and large (3-month old, 139 mg) hatchery-bred M. mossambica were reared in two sediment types for 30 days without feeding. Aeration was supplied and water change was done every other day. Polychaete-free sediments served as control. Sediments obtained from SEAFDEC/AQD Dumangas Brackishwater Station were sun-dried, ground and passed through 1-mm sieve.

    Initial sediment A had 1.86% organic matter, 1,171 ppm available sulfur (SO42-), 194.23 ppm iron (Fe) and 7.86 pH while initial sediment B contained higher organic matter (4.1%), available sulfur (2,456.67 ppm), similar iron level (199.34 ppm) and was more acidic (4.91 pH). In sediment A, small and large polychaetes did not differ (p>0.05) with the control in reducing organic matter but both significantly reduced (p<0.05) available sulfur (77-73%) and iron (69-71%). However, only the large polychaetes increased the pH (p< 0.05, 2.67%). In sediment B, only the large polychaetes reduced (p<0.05) organic matter (27%) but both small and large polychaetes significantly reduced (p<0.05) available sulfur (64-70%) and iron (70-74%). The pH increase was similar to control (17-24%). Large polychaetes had higher survival (93%, p<0.05) than small polychaetes (60%) in sediment B but not different (p>0.05) in sediment A (97%, 87%). The study demonstrated the bioremediation capacity of M. mossambica particularly in reducing available sulfur and iron in sediments.
  • Conference paper

    Adoption of modified commercial scale mud crab hatchery and nursery systems in Alaminos City, Pangasinan 

    RB Cerezo & JF Rebugio - In ET Quinitio, FD Parado-Estepa & RM Coloso (Eds.), Philippines : In the forefront of the mud crab industry development : proceedings of the 1st National Mud Crab Congress, 16-18 November 2015, Iloilo City, Philippines, 2017 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
    Pangasinan’s vast fishpond and mangrove areas have not been fully tapped for mud crab (Scylla serrata) production. The main reason identified for this is the limited supply of crab seedstock. At present, there is no reliable source of seedstock in Pangasinan. The total requirement of Pangasinan for crab seedstock is estimated at 8.89 million based on the total area (ha) devoted to mud crab polyculture in the province. Mud crab growers in Pangasinan procure wild juvenile crabs from Cagayan, Bicol and Visayas but the volume is limited. Thus, an adoption of a modified commercial scale mud crab hatchery and nursery systems in Alaminos City would be helpful. A model mud crab hatchery will be constructed to enable the local government unit (LGU) of Alaminos City to produce seedstock in commercial quantity to boost the production in Pangasinan and nearby provinces. The hatchery aims to produce 480,000 juvenile crabs per year to supply the nursery and grow-out ponds. Likewise, the hatchery technology will promote the mud crab hatchery and nursery technologies in the city of Pangasinan and coastal towns (Infanta, Dasol, Burgos, Agno, Bolinao, Anda, Bani, Sual, Labrador, Lingayen, Binmaley, Dagupan City and San Fabian), and nearby provinces of La Union, Ilocos Sur, Ilocos Norte and Zambales.
  • Conference paper

    Private sectors perspectives: Problems and constraints of the mud crab grow-out industry 

    HR Hocson - In ET Quinitio, FD Parado-Estepa & RM Coloso (Eds.), Philippines : In the forefront of the mud crab industry development : proceedings of the 1st National Mud Crab Congress, 16-18 November 2015, Iloilo City, Philippines, 2017 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
    Mud crab aquaculture industry in the province of Capiz received much attention after production constraints due to diseases were encountered by the prawn industry. Fishpond operators sought for an alternative high value species and realized the potential of the king crab, Scylla serrata. This species is not native to Capiz and has to be sourced from other parts of the country, particularly from the Bicol region and Samar. The techniques for grow-out culture were gradually refined as farmers learned from the experiences of others. Presently, mud crab aquaculture is being done by private sectors based more on art. However, mud crab culture requires a lot of science to make the production consistent and sustainable. The practices of farmers and the problems they have encountered are presented together with the overall industry concerns.
  • Conference paper

    Diseases affecting wild and farmed mud crab in the Philippines 

    EA Tendencia & MVC Cabilitasan - In ET Quinitio, FD Parado-Estepa & RM Coloso (Eds.), Philippines : In the forefront of the mud crab industry development : proceedings of the 1st National Mud Crab Congress, 16-18 November 2015, Iloilo City, Philippines, 2017 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
    Mortalities due to cannibalism and diseases have been reported as major problems in the grow-out phase of mud crab production. This study aimed to identify and describe diseases affecting farmed and wild mud crab (mangrove crab) including predisposing, risk and protective factors, and possible prevention and control measures. A total of 767 wild and farmed mud crab samples were collected. External examination showed abnormalities such as short abdominal flap, discoloration of the abdominal region, darker carapace, lesions on carapace, claws and legs, and presence of epibionts like algae and the barnacles Balanus sp. on the carapace. Internally, necrotic, black and brown gills, and discolored gonads were observed. Stalked barnacles, Octolasmis spp., were observed in the gills. White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) was detected in 14 samples sourced from farms and Infectious hypodermal and haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHHNV) in 2 wild samples. WSSV was implicated in mortality cases. Low temperature and presence of WSSV positive shrimp were identified as risk factors for WSSV infection or outbreak. Pathogenicity tests for some isolated bacteria suggested that these may cause mortality in mud crab under stressful conditions. To prevent mortality due to WSSV infection, it is recommended to avoid polyculture of mud crab with shrimp and/or other crustaceans.
  • Conference paper

    Initiatives on mud crab culture at the Palawan Aquaculture Corporation 

    E Tech, C Emboltorio, D Galila, C Ogsimer & K Lim - In ET Quinitio, FD Parado-Estepa & RM Coloso (Eds.), Philippines : In the forefront of the mud crab industry development : proceedings of the 1st National Mud Crab Congress, 16-18 November 2015, Iloilo City, Philippines, 2017 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
    Mud crab (Scylla spp) has long been a prime commodity in both local and global market and is regarded as one of the important high-value crustacean species produced in the Philippines. Decades ago, its culture basically relied on the availability of wild seedstock collected and grown to marketable size, or on wild lean adult crabs that were fattened for a short period.

    Developments and refinements in the hatchery and nursery techniques paved the way to bringing up culture activities to commercial levels. The Palawan Aquaculture Corporation embarked on mud crab culture in the mid 2014 where initial trials started. Collaboration with SEAFDEC/AQD was later forged bringing forth improvements in the hatchery, nursery and grow-out culture. Hatchery-reared juvenile crabs are now being sold.
  • Conference paper

    Mud crab marketing practices 

    AG Decembrana - In ET Quinitio, FD Parado-Estepa & RM Coloso (Eds.), Philippines : In the forefront of the mud crab industry development : proceedings of the 1st National Mud Crab Congress, 16-18 November 2015, Iloilo City, Philippines, 2017 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
    Presented in the article is the mud crab (Scylla spp.) marketing practices in the province of Capiz. It is one of the major producers of mud crab in brackishwater ponds in the country. Hence, several trading centers or buying stations are found in this province. In Pontevedra, Capiz alone, there are more than 20 buying stations. The crabs from ponds coming from Aklan, Iloilo and within Capiz are brought to the buying stations almost daily. There are 5 kinds of market in the mud crab trading business such as, households, local markets/restaurants, traders/buying, exporters, and importers. Methods in classifying and packing of crabs are also discussed.
  • Conference paper

    Recent developments and enhancing transfer of the nursery technology for the mud crab Scylla serrata 

    FD Parado-Estepa, V Alava, E Garibay, C Bejemino, J Sumile, J Silvestre & ET Quinitio - In ET Quinitio, FD Parado-Estepa & RM Coloso (Eds.), Philippines : In the forefront of the mud crab industry development : proceedings of the 1st National Mud Crab Congress, 16-18 November 2015, Iloilo City, Philippines, 2017 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
    The development of hatchery techniques for seed production of mud crab is expected to address the present problem on the depletion of wild seedstock supply for stocking in grow-out ponds. The nursery serves as the link between the two phases of culture as this involves growing of juvenile crabs produced in the hatchery to sizes that are suitable for stocking in the ponds.

    Nursery rearing involves the use of net cages installed in ponds as holding system for ease in harvest and retrieval of crabs. In the first nursery phase, 0.3-0.5 cm carapace width (CW) juvenile crabs are reared to 1.5-2.0 cm CW for 3-4 weeks and stocks are harvested for selling or are grown further in a second nursery phase in which crabs reach 2.5-3.0 cm after another 3-4 weeks. This paper includes a review of techniques initially developed for the nursery and more recent refinements which involve the use of higher crab instar densities, provision of suitable shelters, trimming of claws and sorting. In addition, production results in farms of collaborators are presented to highlight the efficiency of dissemination and also discusses the challenges faced by the potential nursery industry.
  • Conference paper

    Philippine National Standard for Live Mud Crabs: establishing food safety and quality requirements 

    MF Matubang, TS Palomares, JP Peralta, ET Quinitio, RJ Ragaza, JV Alejo, PB Regazpi, CE Romero, HA Montoya, JG Trinidad & KKA Roscom - In ET Quinitio, FD Parado-Estepa & RM Coloso (Eds.), Philippines : In the forefront of the mud crab industry development : proceedings of the 1st National Mud Crab Congress, 16-18 November 2015, Iloilo City, Philippines, 2017 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
    The Bureau of Agriculture and Fisheries Standards (BAFS) of the Department of Agriculture (DA), in collaboration with the relevant government and research agencies, academe and industry organization, is currently developing the Philippine National Standard (PNS) for live mangrove crabs (also known as mud crabs). This PNS defines the food safety and quality requirements for live mangrove crabs in order to ensure consumers&rsquo; health and make the product globally competitive. The process in the development of standards include review of the existing requirements of local and foreign markets and internationally recognized standards, creation of the Technical Working Group, initial drafting of the PNS, conduct of public consultations in major production areas, finalization of the draft for the PNS, notification to the World Trade Organization and approval of the DA Secretary.

    The PNS for live mangrove crabs specifies the scope of the standard, product description, essential composition and quality factors, hygiene, handling, labeling requirements, methods of sampling, examination and analysis, definition of defectives, and the requirements for product lot acceptance.

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