Now showing items 1-20 of 1724

    • Book

      Biology and hatchery of mangrove crabs Scylla spp. 

      ET Quinitio, FD Parado-Estepa & JJ dela Cruz-Huervana - 2018 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
      Series: Aquaculture extension manual; No. 34
      This manual includes the biology of crab (Scylla serrata, S. tranquebarica, and S. olivacea), and describes principles and procedures for spawning the mature crabs and rearing the zoea to ‘fly’ size crabs. It focuses on the hatchery rearing of S. serrata as the farming of this species is more economically viable than the two other species. The techniques may be modified depending on the conditions or problems encountered in a specific site.
    • Report

      SEAFDEC/AQD Highlights 2017 

      Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center, Aquaculture Department - 2018 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
      SEAFDEC/AQD Highlights 2017 is SEAFDEC/AQD’s annual report updating on its accomplishments and progress for the year 2017.
    • Newsletter

      AQD Matters 2018 March - April 

      JMV de la Cruz (Ed.) - 2018 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
    • AQD Matters 2018 September - October 

      RH Ledesma (Ed.) - 2018 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
    • Newsletter

      AQD Matters 2018 July - August 

      JMV de la Cruz (Ed.) - 2018 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
    • Newsletter

      AQD Matters 2018 May - June 

      RH Ledesma (Ed.) - 2018 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
    • Newsletter

      AQD Matters 45th Anniversary Special Issue 

      RDB Dianala (Ed.) - 2018 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
    • Newsletter

      AQD Matters 2018 January - February 

      RH Ledesma (Ed.) - 2018 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
    • Book

      SEAFDEC/AQD Highlights 2016 

      Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center, Aquaculture Department - 2017 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
      Highlights 2016 is SEAFDEC/AQD’s annual report updating on its accomplishments and progress for the year 2016.
    • Newsletter

      AQD Matters 2017 May - June 

      GK Faigani (Ed.) - 2017 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
    • Newsletter

      AQD Matters 2017 July - August 

      JMV de la Cruz (Ed.) - 2017 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
    • Newsletter

      AQD Matters 2017 September - October 

      RH Ledesma (Ed.) - 2017 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
    • Book

      Diseases of juvenile and adult mud crab Scylla spp. in the Philippines 

      EA Tendencia, MVC Cabilitasan & E Tobias-Quinitio - 2017 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
      Series: Aquaculture extension manual; No. 64
      This manual aims to provide updated information on the diseases of mud crabs initially authored by Lavilla-Pitogo and dela Peña (2004). It includes the name of the disease, causative agent, stages affected, effects on mud crab and methods of prevention and control. Except for the infectious diseases caused by viruses, which can be detected through molecular methods, most of the diseases can be visually diagnosed. Photographs of the external and internal anatomy of a normal mud crab, including the different sexes and species are included to help readers differentiate a normal from a diseased mud crab.
    • Newsletter

      AQD Matters 2017 March - April 

      RH Ledesma (Ed.) - 2017 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
    • Newsletter

      AQD Matters 2017 November - December 

      JMV de la Cruz (Ed.) - 2017 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
    • Newsletter

      AQD Matters 2017 January - February 

      JMV de la Cruz (Ed.) - 2017 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
    • Conference paper

      Mud crab fattening project of KAMAMANA in Del Carmen, Siargao Island 

      AE Sulima - In ET Quinitio, FD Parado-Estepa & RM Coloso (Eds.), Philippines : In the forefront of the mud crab industry development : proceedings of the 1st National Mud Crab Congress, 16-18 November 2015, Iloilo City, Philippines, 2017 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
      The Kaanib ng mga Mangingisda at Magsasaka ng Numancia Aqua-Agrikultura (KAMAMANA), established in Del Carmen, Siargao Island in 2011 is a People's Organization active in promoting the advocacy in 1) protecting the environment and natural resources, 2) providing services for the family welfare, and 3) managing sustainable livelihood programs and community development. One of the major livelihood programs presently being implemented by KAMAMANA is the fattening of mud crab (mangrove crab), Scylla serrata, in plastic containers set up in a mangrove area. Tenurial rights to manage a 2-hectare mangrove area for 25 years was granted to KAMAMANA by the Department of Environmental and Natural Resources.

      Crabs obtained from the mangrove areas of Del Carmen and nearby municipalities are purchased and stocked in plastic containers. The crabs are fed trash fish and mollusks once every afternoon to satiation until they are fattened, usually for 1-2 weeks. The major problem encountered is mortality after molting. Four KAMAMANA members are involved in the crab fattening. When mortalities occur, the dead crabs are usually charged to members assigned in the operation. The fattened crabs are sold to local restaurants, hotels, resorts and walk-in buyers or brought to traders in Surigao City. The net income is divided into the following: members involved in the culture (50%), treasurer (10%), business manager (15%), organizational share (5%), savings (5%) and trust fund (15%).
    • Conference paper

      Polyculture of mud crab in Region 3 

      M Bonifacio - In ET Quinitio, FD Parado-Estepa & RM Coloso (Eds.), Philippines : In the forefront of the mud crab industry development : proceedings of the 1st National Mud Crab Congress, 16-18 November 2015, Iloilo City, Philippines, 2017 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
      The polyculture of mud crab with one to three other species (milkfish (Chanos chanos), tilapia (Oreochromis spp.) and shrimp or sugpo (Penaeus monodon)) is a common practice in Region 3. Pond preparation is given importance prior to stocking of various species. Removal of sludge in the pond and application of probiotics are included in the standard pond preparation. The size and stocking densities of each species vary depending on the season. The volume of water to be replaced is based on the transparency of the water.

      The various species are fed natural food grown in the pond in addition to mollusks and low value fish given specifically for mud crab and shrimp. When pond water becomes transparent (indicating the decrease in phytoplankton density), the water is agitated using a small boat. If water continues to be transparent, fertilizers are applied to enhance growth of natural food. The pond water and animals are closely monitored to prevent diseases. Some of the early signs of occurrence of disease include the presence of bubbles on the water surface, and presence of weak shrimp on the feeding trays and along the dikes. The presence of weak shrimp and crab on the pond bottom and continuous swimming of these animals from night to dawn indicate poor pond water quality which can be remedied by circulating and flushing of the pond water every other day.
    • Conference paper

      Management strategies for grow-out culture of mud crab 

      JG Genodepa - In ET Quinitio, FD Parado-Estepa & RM Coloso (Eds.), Philippines : In the forefront of the mud crab industry development : proceedings of the 1st National Mud Crab Congress, 16-18 November 2015, Iloilo City, Philippines, 2017 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
      There is an increasing interest in mud crab farming because of the growing demand for mud crab in domestic and international markets. Different methods for rearing crabs in ponds, pens and cages have evolved through several years of research and experiences of farmers. Mud crabs are cultured in brackishwater earthen ponds and pens in mangroves. Fattening of lean crabs is also integrated with the grow-out culture system. Cannibalism is one of the major factors affecting the survival of crabs in growout ponds and pens. Hence, various strategies are recommended to reduce cannibalism such as stocking density of less than 2,000 crabs ha-1, provision of suitable shelters, sufficient quantity of natural food and formulated feeds that are evenly distributed in the pond or pen. Feeding rate used in the pen is adjusted to avoid excess feeds that can attract rats and other land animals that can damage the enclosures. Selective harvesting is normally practiced since mud crabs do not grow or get fattened at the same time even if they belong to the same batch.
    • Conference paper

      Growth, survival, proximate and fatty acid composition of sandworm Perinereis quatrefagesi (Grube, 1878) fed variable feed types 

      JB Biñas, VR Alava & WL Campos - In ET Quinitio, FD Parado-Estepa & RM Coloso (Eds.), Philippines : In the forefront of the mud crab industry development : proceedings of the 1st National Mud Crab Congress, 16-18 November 2015, Iloilo City, Philippines, 2017 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
      Sandworm Perinereis quatrefagesi has been used as feed for crustacean broodstock due to its reproductive-enhancing properties particularly protein and highly unsaturated fatty acids (HUFAs). Juvenile sandworms collected along the coast of Guimbal, Iloilo were reared in tanks and fed three nutritionally variable feed types: fish fecal waste, fish meal and rice bran. After 56 days, feeds affected (p<0.05) sandworm growth and crude fat contents but not (p<0.05) survival and crude protein levels. Survival rates were 86~c3 to 89~c5% while crude protein levels were 57.0 ~c 2.5 to 68.0 ~c 5.3 g 100 g-1 dry weight. High crude protein fish meal promoted better (p<0.05) growth (2.2~c0.4% day-1) than fish feces (1.2~c0.3% day-1) and rice bran (1.1~c0.3 % day-1). However, crude fat content of sandworm was higher (p<0.05) in rice bran (18.9~c1.6 g 100 g-1) than in fecal waste (13.6~c2.9 g 100 g-1) and fish meal (10.5~c3.1 g 100 g-1) treatments. Levels of highly unsaturated fatty acids (HUFAs) such as 20:4 n-6, 22:6 n-3 and 20:5 n-3 did not differ significantly (p>0.05) at 0.41~c0.21 to 0.89~c0.51 g 100 g-1, 0.21~c0.24 to 0.43~c0.22 g 100 g-1 and 0.57~c0.46 to 0.88~c0.31 g 100 g-1, respectively.

      The study demonstrated that P. quatrefagesi: (1) can survive well in nutritionally variable feed types although it grows better in high protein diet; (2) crude protein levels were high regardless of feed types; and (3) crude fat content was high in high fat diet but n-3 and n-6 HUFAs were not significantly different regardless of feed types.