Now showing items 1-3 of 3

    • Conference paper

      A brief account of the experience of Sabah Fisheries Department in fish larval rearing 

      CF Komilus & FD Parado-Estepa - In CL Marte, GF Quinitio & AC Emata (Eds.), Proceedings of the Seminar-Workshop on Breeding and Seed Production of Cultured Finfishes in the Philippines, Tigbauan, Iloilo, Philippines, 4-5 May 1993, 1996 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
      Venturing into the aquaculture sector especially in pond and cage culture is a step that has been taken up by entrepreneurs and traditional fishermen of Sabah. However, shortage in the supply of fish fry is a stumbling block to the progress of the industry.

      The Sabah Fisheries Department has taken steps to overcome this problem by setting up a hatchery with the objectives to transfer know-how on hatchery technologies to the private sector besides producing fry for distribution.

      The Tanjong Badak multi-species hatchery is a newly established hatchery, completed in mid-1990. The species reared for production purposes are tiger shrimp and finfish which include red snapper, grouper, sea bass and polkadot grouper. The Department has not close to producing sea bass fry. Shrimp fry at juvenile stages (PL 40) are distributed as subsidies to local fish farmers while some are reared at the Department's various cage and pond culture projects. Limited success in producing grouper and red snapper fry have been achieved to date. The incidence of very low fertilization rates of eggs coupled with low survival rates are major problems facing the hatchery.

      In conclusion, the Sabah Fisheries Department's experience in fish larval rearing is still limited. Greater scientific research and studies need to be carried out to improve further the performance of the hatchery to achieve the target of fry sufficiency for the aquaculture industry.
    • Conference paper

      Mass larval rearing technology of marine finfish in Japan 

      K Fukusho - In CL Marte, GF Quinitio & AC Emata (Eds.), Proceedings of the Seminar-Workshop on Breeding and Seed Production of Cultured Finfishes in the Philippines, Tigbauan, Iloilo, Philippines, 4-5 May 1993, 1996 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
      With economic development and increased demand for high price fish, industrial scale marine finfish culture in Japan was started in 1960-1965 for yellowtail Seriola quinqueradiata. Sustainable supply of wild juvenile and development of floating cage with synthetic fiber net have spurred the culture of nearly 30 species and total production in 1991 is 265 x 103 metric tons (nearly 25% of total aquaculture production). Although salmon ranching had been started in 1888, a national project of ocean ranching was only initiated in 1963 with the present target of 26 species of marine finfish. Ocean ranching aims to increase fisheries resources in coastal sea by stocking hatchery-reared juveniles and preservation of environmental capacity and habitat. Therefore, mass production of marine finfish juveniles is being done for the intensive culture in net cage and for stocking coastal sea in Japan.

      Nearly 200 million juveniles are produced by ocean ranching centers (14 national, 49 prefectural, 21 city and town, 53 fishermen's association). The number of target fish is about 60 species (excluding salmon and trout). The main species produced are red sea bream, Pagrus major, flounder, Paralichthys olivaceus, puffer, Takifugu rubrapes, rockfish, Sebastes shlegeli, and mud dab, Limanda yokohamae. More than one million juveniles of these species are produced at one hatchery or ocean ranching center per one fry production season. About 70% of total production of juveniles consist of red sea bream and flounder. Red sea bream could be used to introduce mass larval rearing technology in Japan since its mass production is well developed. The focus of the present paper is the present status and short history of the development in larval rearing technology for red sea bream.
    • Conference paper

      Review of SEAFDEC/AQD finfish seed production research 

      GF Quinitio & MN Duray - In CL Marte, GF Quinitio & AC Emata (Eds.), Proceedings of the Seminar-Workshop on Breeding and Seed Production of Cultured Finfishes in the Philippines, Tigbauan, Iloilo, Philippines, 4-5 May 1993, 1996 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
      Research on seed production of several foodfishes has been a continuing activity of SEAFDEC/AQD since 1976. Fry and juvenile production methods of these fish commodities are in various stages of advancement. For instance, advances in the development of hatchery rearing, particularly feeding and water management schemes, have made mass production of milkfish (Chanos chanos) seed a reality, resulting further in the application of the technology in commercial hatcheries. Recent studies now focus on assessing the quality of hatchery seed stocks of milkfish vis-a-vis wild seed during nursery and grow-out culture. Likewise, sea bass (Lates calcarifer) seed production has undergone significant improvements since the technology was introduced in the Philippines in 1982. Fatty acid-enrichment of a zooplankton diet can enhance growth and survival of sea bass fry, although other cheaper alternatives and early weaning to formulated diet preparations are currently being tested. Hatchery fry production of grouper (Epinephelus salmoides and E. suillus syn. E. coioides) and snapper is in its infancy, but trials complemented by research on their larval feeding habits and requirements are underway to establish reliable methods of rearing larvae of these species. Although fairly well-established, seed production of rabbitfish (Siganus guttatus) requires further improvement in determining an appropriate zooplankton diet to ensure adequate growth and survival of larvae. Hatchery fry production of tilapia (Oreochromis sp.), carps (Aristichthys nobilis, Hypothalmichthys molitrix) and, to a certain extent, catfish (Clarias macrocephalus) can already be categorized as a flourishing industry in some parts of the Philippines. Nonetheless, SEAFDEC/AQD continues to conduct research on these freshwater species, with particular emphasis on nutrition and feed development during the nursery production phase. Together, results of past and on-going research studies ensure that seed supply of these important foodfishes become adequate and sustainable for the grow-out.