Now showing items 1-4 of 4

    • Conference paper

      A brief account of the experience of Sabah Fisheries Department in fish larval rearing 

      CF Komilus & FD Parado-Estepa - In CL Marte, GF Quinitio & AC Emata (Eds.), Proceedings of the Seminar-Workshop on Breeding and Seed Production of Cultured Finfishes in the Philippines, Tigbauan, Iloilo, Philippines, 4-5 May 1993, 1996 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
      Venturing into the aquaculture sector especially in pond and cage culture is a step that has been taken up by entrepreneurs and traditional fishermen of Sabah. However, shortage in the supply of fish fry is a stumbling block to the progress of the industry.

      The Sabah Fisheries Department has taken steps to overcome this problem by setting up a hatchery with the objectives to transfer know-how on hatchery technologies to the private sector besides producing fry for distribution.

      The Tanjong Badak multi-species hatchery is a newly established hatchery, completed in mid-1990. The species reared for production purposes are tiger shrimp and finfish which include red snapper, grouper, sea bass and polkadot grouper. The Department has not close to producing sea bass fry. Shrimp fry at juvenile stages (PL 40) are distributed as subsidies to local fish farmers while some are reared at the Department's various cage and pond culture projects. Limited success in producing grouper and red snapper fry have been achieved to date. The incidence of very low fertilization rates of eggs coupled with low survival rates are major problems facing the hatchery.

      In conclusion, the Sabah Fisheries Department's experience in fish larval rearing is still limited. Greater scientific research and studies need to be carried out to improve further the performance of the hatchery to achieve the target of fry sufficiency for the aquaculture industry.
    • Conference paper

      Mass larval rearing technology of marine finfish in Japan 

      K Fukusho - In CL Marte, GF Quinitio & AC Emata (Eds.), Proceedings of the Seminar-Workshop on Breeding and Seed Production of Cultured Finfishes in the Philippines, Tigbauan, Iloilo, Philippines, 4-5 May 1993, 1996 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
      With economic development and increased demand for high price fish, industrial scale marine finfish culture in Japan was started in 1960-1965 for yellowtail Seriola quinqueradiata. Sustainable supply of wild juvenile and development of floating cage with synthetic fiber net have spurred the culture of nearly 30 species and total production in 1991 is 265 x 103 metric tons (nearly 25% of total aquaculture production). Although salmon ranching had been started in 1888, a national project of ocean ranching was only initiated in 1963 with the present target of 26 species of marine finfish. Ocean ranching aims to increase fisheries resources in coastal sea by stocking hatchery-reared juveniles and preservation of environmental capacity and habitat. Therefore, mass production of marine finfish juveniles is being done for the intensive culture in net cage and for stocking coastal sea in Japan.

      Nearly 200 million juveniles are produced by ocean ranching centers (14 national, 49 prefectural, 21 city and town, 53 fishermen's association). The number of target fish is about 60 species (excluding salmon and trout). The main species produced are red sea bream, Pagrus major, flounder, Paralichthys olivaceus, puffer, Takifugu rubrapes, rockfish, Sebastes shlegeli, and mud dab, Limanda yokohamae. More than one million juveniles of these species are produced at one hatchery or ocean ranching center per one fry production season. About 70% of total production of juveniles consist of red sea bream and flounder. Red sea bream could be used to introduce mass larval rearing technology in Japan since its mass production is well developed. The focus of the present paper is the present status and short history of the development in larval rearing technology for red sea bream.
    • Conference paper

      Resistance of two Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus (L.) strains exposed to a mixture of zinc, cadmium and inorganic mercury 

      MLA Cuvin-Aralar - In CL Marte, GF Quinitio & AC Emata (Eds.), Proceedings of the Seminar-Workshop on Breeding and Seed Production of Cultured Finfishes in the Philippines, Tigbauan, Iloilo, Philippines, 4-5 May 1993, 1996 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
      Two strains of one month-old Oreochromis niloticus namely CLSU (obtained from Central Luzon State University, Philippines) and NIFI (from National Inland Fisheries Institute, Thailand) were exposed to a sublethal mixture of 1.0 mg L-1 Zn, 0.1 mg L-1 Cd, and 0.01 mg L-1 Hg for two months in aquaria. Another set served as control with only BFS tapwater in the aquaria. At the end of the exposure period the fish were grown for another 2 months in net cages in Laguna de Bay. During the exposure (aquarium) and grow-out (lake) phases, the uptake and elimination of the metals were determined by AAS. Accumulation of the metals peaked at 13.9 µg g-1 Hg, 78.5 µg g-1 Cd, and 1447.0 µg g-1 Zn for NIFI and 14.2 µg g-1 Hg, 82.4 µg g-1 Cd, and 1591.3 µg g-1 Zn for CLSU lost 94.9% Hg, 98.76% Cd, and 89.99% Zn after two months in the lake. After the grow-out period, 2 females and 1 male of each strain were stocked in replicate polyethylene tanks. Time to first spawning, spawning frequency, fry production, and fry survival (after 30 days) were monitored. Results showed no significant effect of treatment and strain with respect to time to first spawning, spawning frequency, and mean fry survival. There was also no significant difference between the treatment and strain in mean fry production when dam weight was used as a covariate in the analysis. The results suggest that both strains of O. niloticus are resistant to long-term exposure to the metals. In addition, the elimination of the metals during the grow-out phase may have also diminished their effect on the breeders of the two strains.
    • Conference paper

      Tilapia breeding and seed production for brackishwater culture in the Philippines 

      RD Guerrero III, LA Guerrero & RG Cornejo - In CL Marte, GF Quinitio & AC Emata (Eds.), Proceedings of the Seminar-Workshop on Breeding and Seed Production of Cultured Finfishes in the Philippines, Tigbauan, Iloilo, Philippines, 4-5 May 1993, 1996 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
      Tilapias are important foodfishes in the Philippines second only to milkfish. While farming of tilapias in freshwater ponds and cages is already established, there is a need for wider application of the available technologies for brackishwater culture. This paper presents the tilapia species used for brackishwater farming and the commercial methods applied for their hatchery/nursery rearing.