Now showing items 1-4 of 4

    • Conference paper

      Flounder metamorphosis: its regulation by various hormones 

      EG de Jesus, T Hirano & Y Inui - In CL Marte, GF Quinitio & AC Emata (Eds.), Proceedings of the Seminar-Workshop on Breeding and Seed Production of Cultured Finfishes in the Philippines, Tigbauan, Iloilo, Philippines, 4-5 May 1993, 1996 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
      The elongation and shortening of the flounder fin rays during its metamorphosis may be parallel to the appearance and resorption of the tadpole tail during amphibian metamorphosis. The dorsal fin rays of the Japanese flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) elongate during the time when thyroid hormone levels are low and are resorbed during climax of metamorphosis when thyroid levels are elevated. Using an in vitro system for culture of isolated flounder fin rays, we examined how various hormones affect the process of resorption. Both T4 and T3 directly stimulated fin ray shortening, T3 being more potent than T4. Other hormones did not directly affect the resorption process but modified the tissue's response to thyroid hormones. Cortisol enhanced the stimulatory effects of both T4 and T3. On the other hand, estradiol and testosterone were inhibitory. Ovine prolactin (oPRL) also diminished the effect of T3 while ovine growth hormone (oGH) was without effect. Similar observations were observed from the in vivo studies.

      Thyroid hormone levels, especially T4, were low during premetamorphosis, increased during prometamorphosis, to peak levels during metamorphic climax, and declined in the juveniles. The changes in whole body concentrations of Cortisol paralleled the changes in thyroid hormone concentrations. On the other hand, whole body estradiol and testosterone concentrations did not show significant change and remained low throughout the larval period. The expression of GH and PRLmRNA, as assessed by in situ hybridization using cDNA for flounder PRL and GH also increased during the metamorphosis. However, the increase in the expression of GH and PRL genes was observed later than the increases in tissue levels of thyroid hormones and Cortisol. At late climax, the flounder larvae have undergone considerable transformation, presumably triggered by both hormones, hence the increase in PRL could hardly be antimetamorphic but may have other physiological implications.
    • Conference paper

      Influence of LHRHa and methyltestosterone on milt production of sea bass Lates calcarifer (Bloch) 

      GV Hilomen-Garcia, RB Baldevarona & FJ Lacanilao - In CL Marte, GF Quinitio & AC Emata (Eds.), Proceedings of the Seminar-Workshop on Breeding and Seed Production of Cultured Finfishes in the Philippines, Tigbauan, Iloilo, Philippines, 4-5 May 1993, 1996 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
      Milt volume, sperm density, and number of spermatozoa were determined to quantify milt production of mature sea bass after a single injection of LHRHa [(D-Ala6,Pro9-N-ethylamiide)LHRH] in saline solution and 17α-methyltestosterone in corn oil (MT). Two measures of sperm density, sperm count and spermatocrit, were highly correlated (r=0.85). Compared with control, milt volume and the number of spermatozoa collected increased but sperm count decreased (24% at 24 h) after a LHRHa (20 µg/kg body weight treatment, suggesting a stimulation of spermatozoa production and not merely milt dilution. Further milt dilution (44%) was induced by 80 µg/kg LHRHa (LHRHa80) at 12 h post-treatment but not by 200 µg/kg MT (MT200) alone. A milt dilution of only 27% at 12 h after simultaneous injections of LHRHa80 and MT200 may indicate some inhibitory effect of MT on the efficiency of LHRHa. These results demonstrate that the stimulation of milt production by LHRHa involves testicular hydration resulting in milt dilution.
    • Conference paper

      A review of SEAFDEC/AQD finfish breeding research 

      LMB Garcia - In CL Marte, GF Quinitio & AC Emata (Eds.), Proceedings of the Seminar-Workshop on Breeding and Seed Production of Cultured Finfishes in the Philippines, Tigbauan, Iloilo, Philippines, 4-5 May 1993, 1996 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
      Recent progress undertaken by SEAFDEC/AQD in the development of broodstock of a variety of cultured fish in the Philippines is reviewed. Spontaneous maturation and spawning has been achieved among captive breeders of grouper, milkfish, sea bass, rabbitfish, and tilapia. Hormonal intervention methods have been developed mainly to accelerated final gonadal maturation to synchronize release of mature gametes, and to control sex inversion among hermaphroditic fish such as grouper. These methods entailed the development of gonadal biopsy procedures and hormone administration protocols such as mode on introducing a variety of exogenous hormones to fish, administration intervals, and lately response times.Enhancement of reproduction by improving the diet fed to Nile tilapia, rabbitfish, and milkfish breeders has also been achieved in recent years. Protein or lipid enrichment of the diet may enhance growth of broodstock to subsequently increase reproductive performance and fry survival.Limited success has been achieved with photoperiod manipulation to effect year-round sexual maturation and spawning of milkfish and sea bass broodstock.
    • Conference paper

      Role of growth hormone in the adaptation to sea water of juveline brown trout, (Salmo trutta) 

      JME Almendras & P Punet - In CL Marte, GF Quinitio & AC Emata (Eds.), Proceedings of the Seminar-Workshop on Breeding and Seed Production of Cultured Finfishes in the Philippines, Tigbauan, Iloilo, Philippines, 4-5 May 1993, 1996 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
      The first part of the study investigates the ability of ovine growth hormone (oGH) to enhance the hypo-osmoregulatory and growth performance of juvenile brown trout after exposure to sea water (SW). Three groups of fish were either intraperitoneally implanted with cholesterol pellet (sham) or with a cholesterol pellet containing 250 µg oGH (treated) or not implanted (control). While still in fresh water (FW), gill Na+/K+ATPase activity of the oGH-treated group was four times higher than that of sham and control groups. Exposure to SW resulted to dramatic increases in plasma electrolyte levels of the sham and control groups, whereas the oGH-treated group showed only minor perturbations in plasma electrolyte concentrations. Further increases in gill Na+/K+ ATPase activity were observed in the oGH-treated group after SW exposure, while in the sham and control, a lag time of seven days was needed before gill ATPase activity started to increase. Additionally, by the end of the experiment, oGH-treated fish were significantly larger than non-treated ones.

      The second part of the study examines the time course of changes in plasma GH levels and GH free binding sites and affinity of the organs involved in osmoregulation in juvenile brown trout kept in FW or exposed to SW. Plasma GH levels increased significantly one day after SW exposure, reaching a peak on the 14th day. Concomitantly, GH free binding sites in the gills and liver decreased significantly in trout exposed to SW but remained unchanged in trout kept in FW. Reduction in GH free binding sites in SW-exposed trout indicates occupation of the gill and liver GH receptor by GH during the course of SW adaptation which may point to a direct role of GH on gill and liver physiology during hypo-osmoregulation.

      The second part of the study examines the time course of changes in plasma GH levels and GH free binding sites and affinity of the organs involved in osmoregulation in juvenile brown trout kept in FW or exposed to SW. Plasma GH levels increased significantly one day after SW exposure, reaching a peak on the 14th day. Concomitantly, GH free binding sites in the gills and liver decreased significantly in trout exposed to SW but remained unchanged in trout kept in FW. Reduction in GH free binding sites in SW-exposed trout indicates occupation of the gill and liver GH receptor by GH during the course of SW adaptation which may point to a direct role of GH on gill and liver physiology during hypo-osmoregulation.