Now showing items 1-6 of 6

    • Conference paper

      Artificial incubation for intensive fry production of Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus (L.) 

      GC Mair, CC Estabillo & LR Dahilig - In CL Marte, GF Quinitio & AC Emata (Eds.), Proceedings of the Seminar-Workshop on Breeding and Seed Production of Cultured Finfishes in the Philippines, Tigbauan, Iloilo, Philippines, 4-5 May 1993, 1996 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
      Two experiments were conducted to evaluate and compare the production, quality, and survival of eggs and the subsequent growth and survival of fry in two small scale production systems: (i) natural incubation (NI), and (ii) egg collection followed by artificial incubation in upwelling glass funnels (AI). Cost benefits analysis was applied to the production figures to compare the economic viability of the two methods. The results were used to design a fry production system for the intensive production of Genetically Male Tilapia (GMT) from limited numbers of novel YY-male broodstock.
    • Conference paper

      Larviculture of milkfish (Chanos chanos) in outdoor tanks 

      MN Duray - In CL Marte, GF Quinitio & AC Emata (Eds.), Proceedings of the Seminar-Workshop on Breeding and Seed Production of Cultured Finfishes in the Philippines, Tigbauan, Iloilo, Philippines, 4-5 May 1993, 1996 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
      In the past, larviculture of milkfish depended entirely on the use of rotifers and brine shrimp nauplii and rearing trials were done under roofed facilities. Since the dietary value of live food varies according to culture and feeding conditions, rotifers were enriched with SELCO, a lipid emulsion containing high levels of highly unsaturated fatty acids (HUFA) prior to feeding the larvae. Alternatively, a microbound larval feed (Nosan R-1) was given as a supplement to rotifers during the first two weeks of culture. Larval growth was enhanced and survival was significantly improved when rotifers were enriched or supplemented with these diets. All rearing trials were conducted in 5-10 tons concrete circular/rectangular outdoor tanks.

      Verification runs on the use of HUFA-enriched rotifers to milkfish larvae were tried in two nearby private hatcheries. Results from mis collaborative work are presented.
    • Conference paper

      Mass larval rearing technology of marine finfish in Japan 

      K Fukusho - In CL Marte, GF Quinitio & AC Emata (Eds.), Proceedings of the Seminar-Workshop on Breeding and Seed Production of Cultured Finfishes in the Philippines, Tigbauan, Iloilo, Philippines, 4-5 May 1993, 1996 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
      With economic development and increased demand for high price fish, industrial scale marine finfish culture in Japan was started in 1960-1965 for yellowtail Seriola quinqueradiata. Sustainable supply of wild juvenile and development of floating cage with synthetic fiber net have spurred the culture of nearly 30 species and total production in 1991 is 265 x 103 metric tons (nearly 25% of total aquaculture production). Although salmon ranching had been started in 1888, a national project of ocean ranching was only initiated in 1963 with the present target of 26 species of marine finfish. Ocean ranching aims to increase fisheries resources in coastal sea by stocking hatchery-reared juveniles and preservation of environmental capacity and habitat. Therefore, mass production of marine finfish juveniles is being done for the intensive culture in net cage and for stocking coastal sea in Japan.

      Nearly 200 million juveniles are produced by ocean ranching centers (14 national, 49 prefectural, 21 city and town, 53 fishermen's association). The number of target fish is about 60 species (excluding salmon and trout). The main species produced are red sea bream, Pagrus major, flounder, Paralichthys olivaceus, puffer, Takifugu rubrapes, rockfish, Sebastes shlegeli, and mud dab, Limanda yokohamae. More than one million juveniles of these species are produced at one hatchery or ocean ranching center per one fry production season. About 70% of total production of juveniles consist of red sea bream and flounder. Red sea bream could be used to introduce mass larval rearing technology in Japan since its mass production is well developed. The focus of the present paper is the present status and short history of the development in larval rearing technology for red sea bream.
    • Conference paper

      A review of grouper (Epinephelus suillus) fry production research in Malaysia 

      HM Ali - In CL Marte, GF Quinitio & AC Emata (Eds.), Proceedings of the Seminar-Workshop on Breeding and Seed Production of Cultured Finfishes in the Philippines, Tigbauan, Iloilo, Philippines, 4-5 May 1993, 1996 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
      Research on grouper (Epinephelus suillus) fry production in captivity has been carried out in Malaysia since 1986 at Tanjung Demong Marine Finfish Production and Research Centre (TDMFPRC) but the breakthrough was only achieved four years later in 1990. Eggs were obtained through natural and induced spawning in tanks. Natural spawning of grouper in captivity seldom occurred and was unpredictable. However induced spawnings were successfully carried out by injecting human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) intramuscularly at a dose of 500-1000 IU/kg fish.

      The results from several trials on larval rearing conducted since 1989 until recently showed that larvae obtained from natural spawnings survived longer with some reaching the juvenile stage. The highest recorded survival rate of 43 days posthatch (32.5 mm total length) was 12.1% at 28-32 °C water temperature. On the other hand, 100% mortality usually occurred in larvae obtained from induced spawning 7 days after hatching.

      The major constraints of grouper fry production in Malaysia are lack of male spawners, inconsistent and unpredictable natural spawning, small quantity of eggs released every spawning day, poor fertilization and hatching rate, weak hatchlings, and high mortality rate at the early stages of larval development. The latter is probably due mainly to problems on initial feeding.
    • Conference paper

      Review of SEAFDEC/AQD finfish seed production research 

      GF Quinitio & MN Duray - In CL Marte, GF Quinitio & AC Emata (Eds.), Proceedings of the Seminar-Workshop on Breeding and Seed Production of Cultured Finfishes in the Philippines, Tigbauan, Iloilo, Philippines, 4-5 May 1993, 1996 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
      Research on seed production of several foodfishes has been a continuing activity of SEAFDEC/AQD since 1976. Fry and juvenile production methods of these fish commodities are in various stages of advancement. For instance, advances in the development of hatchery rearing, particularly feeding and water management schemes, have made mass production of milkfish (Chanos chanos) seed a reality, resulting further in the application of the technology in commercial hatcheries. Recent studies now focus on assessing the quality of hatchery seed stocks of milkfish vis-a-vis wild seed during nursery and grow-out culture. Likewise, sea bass (Lates calcarifer) seed production has undergone significant improvements since the technology was introduced in the Philippines in 1982. Fatty acid-enrichment of a zooplankton diet can enhance growth and survival of sea bass fry, although other cheaper alternatives and early weaning to formulated diet preparations are currently being tested. Hatchery fry production of grouper (Epinephelus salmoides and E. suillus syn. E. coioides) and snapper is in its infancy, but trials complemented by research on their larval feeding habits and requirements are underway to establish reliable methods of rearing larvae of these species. Although fairly well-established, seed production of rabbitfish (Siganus guttatus) requires further improvement in determining an appropriate zooplankton diet to ensure adequate growth and survival of larvae. Hatchery fry production of tilapia (Oreochromis sp.), carps (Aristichthys nobilis, Hypothalmichthys molitrix) and, to a certain extent, catfish (Clarias macrocephalus) can already be categorized as a flourishing industry in some parts of the Philippines. Nonetheless, SEAFDEC/AQD continues to conduct research on these freshwater species, with particular emphasis on nutrition and feed development during the nursery production phase. Together, results of past and on-going research studies ensure that seed supply of these important foodfishes become adequate and sustainable for the grow-out.
    • Conference paper

      Tilapia breeding and seed production for brackishwater culture in the Philippines 

      RD Guerrero III, LA Guerrero & RG Cornejo - In CL Marte, GF Quinitio & AC Emata (Eds.), Proceedings of the Seminar-Workshop on Breeding and Seed Production of Cultured Finfishes in the Philippines, Tigbauan, Iloilo, Philippines, 4-5 May 1993, 1996 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
      Tilapias are important foodfishes in the Philippines second only to milkfish. While farming of tilapias in freshwater ponds and cages is already established, there is a need for wider application of the available technologies for brackishwater culture. This paper presents the tilapia species used for brackishwater farming and the commercial methods applied for their hatchery/nursery rearing.