Now showing items 1-20 of 3152

    • Book

      1997 highlights 

      Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center, Aquaculture Department - 1998 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
      Discusses AQD's accomplishments in 1997 in the areas of:

      • poverty alleviation -- the community fishery resource management projects in Malalison Island and Honda Bay

      • food security issues -- the technical assistance to local government units on low input aquaculture products like tilapia and mussel-oyster

      • environment-friendly aquaculture technologies -- the development of mudcrab culture techniques in reforested mangrove areas, and the rehabilitation of mangroves / abandoned ponds through aquasilviculture

      • research into export or cash crops -- mudcrab, tiger shrimp, grouper, seabass, snapper, catfish, seaweeds, abalone, marine ornamental fish.

      Also discussed: technology verification activities, training, and information dissemination.
    • Serial | Book

      1998 highlights 

      Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center, Aquaculture Department - 1999 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
      The SEAFDEC Aquaculture Department is mandated to: 1) promote and undertake aquaculture research relevant and appropriate for the region; 2) develop human resources for the region; and, 3) disseminate and exchange information on aquaculture. The document provides highlights of activities of the Department during the year 1998.
    • Serial | Book

      1999 highlights 

      Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center, Aquaculture Department - 2000 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center (SEAFDEC/AQD)
      AQD continued to pursue its considerable research efforts into mudcrab, tiger shrimp, milkfish, grouper and snapper, tilapia and bighead carp, marine ornamental fishes, seaweeds, and abalone. The seed production and grow-out culture technologies developed from research were verified as to their commercial viability with the help of private fishfarms and local government units in the Philippines. Packets of technology had likewise been extended by AQD through its training courses and information programs.
    • Serial | Book

      2000 highlights 

      Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center, Aquaculture Department - 2001 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center (SEAFDEC/AQD)
      In 2000, refinements of already developed technologies and industry practices were aimed at increasing aquaculture production and decreasing production cost through more innovative approaches like the application of biotechnology, particularly on growth acceleration. Technologies were also verified in actual field conditions as to technical, environmental, and socioeconomic considerations. Those found viable were demonstrated in various sites in collaboration with the Philippine government agencies, local government units, and fishfarmers. On the regional level, and initially in collaboration with the Department of Fisheries of Thailand, AQD conducted verification and demonstration activities in Thailand and Vietnam.
    • Serial | Book

      2001 Highlights 

      Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center, Aquaculture Department - 2002 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center (SEAFDEC/AQD)
      The SEAFDEC Aquaculture Department is mandated to: 1) promote and undertake aquaculture research that is relevant and appropriate for the Southeast Asia region; 2) develop human resources for the region; and, 3) disseminate and exchange information on aquaculture. The Aquaculture Department in the Philippines maintains 4 stations: in Iloilo Province, the Tigbauan Main Station and Dumangas Brackishwater Station; in Guimaras, the Igang Marine Station; and, in Rizal, the Binangonan Freshwater Substation. Highlights are provided of the research programmes and activities conducted by the department during the year 2001.
    • Serial | Book

      2002 Highlights 

      Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center, Aquaculture Department - 2003 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
      The SEAFDEC Aquaculture Department is mandated to: 1) promote and undertake aquaculture research that is relevant and appropriate for the region; 2) develop human resources for the region; and, 3) disseminate and exchange information in aquaculture. The Aquaculture Department in the Philippines maintains 4 stations: in Iloilo Province, the Tigbauan Main Station and Dumangas Brackishwater Station; in Guimaras, the Igang Marine Station; and, in Rizal, the Binangonan Freshwater Substation. Highlights are provided of the research programmes and activities conducted by the department during the year 2002.
    • Serial | Book

      2003 Highlights 

      Bagarinao, Teodora U. - 2004 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
      The SEAFDEC Aquaculture Department is mandated to: 1) conduct scientific research to generate aquaculture technologies appropriate for Southeast Asia; 2) develop managerial, technical and skilled manpower for the aquaculture sector; and, 3) disseminate and exchange aquaculture information. The Aquaculture Department in the Philippines maintains 5 stations: the Tigbauan Main Station and Dumangas Brackishwater Station in Iloilo; the Igang Marine Station in Guimaras; and, the Binangonan Freshwater Station and ABCDEF Jalajala in Rizal. Highlights are provided of the research programmes and activities conducted by the department during the year 2003.
    • Conference paper

      2010 and beyond: better seeds for sustainable aquatic food production in Asia. 

      MRR Romana-Eguia & EGT de Jesus-Ayson - In BO Acosta, RM Coloso, EGT de Jesus-Ayson & JD Toledo (Eds.), Sustainable aquaculture development for food security in Southeast Asia towards 2020. Proceedings of the Regional Technical Consultation on Sustainable Aquaculture Development in Southeast Asia Towards 2020, 2011 - SEAFDEC Aquaculture Department
      Asia is a major contributor to world aquaculture production. Most Asian countries have maintained their rank in the ten top aquatic food producing nations after developing refined techniques for major commercially important aquaculture species and promoting an increased awareness on the merits of using quality seeds (genetically enhanced or otherwise) as supplied in sufficient quantities. Quality seedstock simply means fit, clean , uniformly-sized seeds which could be eggs, fry, fingerling, juveniles and/or plantlets (for seaweeds) that subsequently express good performance attributes during culture. Beneficial traits refer to good color, shape, growth, efficient feed conversion, high reproduction, tolerance and survival when exposed to stressors (e.g. diseases, poor and/or extreme environmental conditions). Such traits are mostly heritable, hence, quality seeds are usually assumed as produced only by mating stocks perceived or proven to be genetically superior. Some bloodstocks may be genetically mediocre but if bred and manage properly through efficient farm protocols (suitable hatchery, nursery feeding and water management methods), may also produce good quality seeds. Success in the sustainable production of aquatic species for human consumption depends primarily on the availability of seedstock and adoption of optimal husbandry techniques among others. With the intensification of aquaculture systems and the environmental challenges such as those resulting from climate change, it is wise to continue considering both factors -- genetic quality and culture management as equally important in ensuring a steady production of good quality seeds and later, marketable products from aquaculture. Views on what, how and why better quality aquaculture seeds should be produced evolve as times change. To understand these concerns, this paper will cover: (a) the present state of fish seed production in Asia, (b) recent and current seedstock production issues that require attention, and (c) recommendations on how to further enhance aquaculture production in the region in the next decade through better quality seedstock.
    • Book

      2011 SEAFDEC/AQD highlights 

      Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center - 2012 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
      The SEAFDEC Aquaculture Department is mandated to: 1) conduct scientific research to generate aquaculture technologies appropriate for Southeast Asia; 2) develop managerial, technical and skilled manpower for the aquaculture sector; and, 3) disseminate and exchange aquaculture information. The Aquaculture Department in the Philippines maintains 4 stations: the Tigbauan Main Station and Dumangas Brackishwater Station in Iloilo; the Igang Marine Station in Guimaras; and, the Binangonan Freshwater Station in Rizal. Highlights are provided of the seven research programmes and activities conducted by the department during the year 2011.
    • Book

      2012 SEAFDEC/AQD highlights 

      Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center - 2013 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
      The SEAFDEC Aquaculture Department is mandated to: 1) conduct scientific research to generate aquaculture technologies appropriate for Southeast Asia; 2) develop managerial, technical and skilled manpower for the aquaculture sector; and, 3) disseminate and exchange aquaculture information. The Aquaculture Department in the Philippines maintains 4 stations: the Tigbauan Main Station and Dumangas Brackishwater Station in Iloilo; the Igang Marine Station in Guimaras; and, the Binangonan Freshwater Station in Rizal. Highlights are provided of the seven research programmes and activities conducted by the department during the year 2012.
    • Book

      2013 SEAFDEC/AQD highlights 

      Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center - 2014 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
      The SEAFDEC Aquaculture Department is mandated to: 1) conduct scientific research to generate aquaculture technologies appropriate for Southeast Asia; 2) develop managerial, technical and skilled manpower for the aquaculture sector; and, 3) disseminate and exchange aquaculture information. The Aquaculture Department in the Philippines maintains 4 stations: the Tigbauan Main Station and Dumangas Brackishwater Station in Iloilo; the Igang Marine Station in Guimaras; and, the Binangonan Freshwater Station in Rizal. Highlights are provided of the seven research programmes and activities conducted by the department during the year 2013.
    • Book

      2014 SEAFDEC/AQD Highlights 

      Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center - 2015 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
      The SEAFDEC Aquaculture Department is mandated to: 1) conduct scientific research to generate aquaculture technologies appropriate for Southeast Asia; 2) develop managerial, technical and skilled manpower for the aquaculture sector; and, 3) disseminate and exchange aquaculture information. The Aquaculture Department in the Philippines maintains 4 stations: the Tigbauan Main Station and Dumangas Brackishwater Station in Iloilo; the Igang Marine Station in Guimaras; and, the Binangonan Freshwater Station in Rizal. Highlights are provided of the seven research programmes and activities conducted by the department during the year 2014.
    • Article

      A comparative study of various extenders of milkfish, Chanos chanos (Forsskal) sperm preservation 

      S Hara, JT Canto Jr. & JM Almendras - SEAFDEC Aquaculture Department Quarterly Research Report, 1980 - SEAFDEC Aquaculture Department
      Four chemical extenders in 7 different concentrations (potassium chloride, sodium chloride, glucose, sodium citrate, Ringer s solution, cow serum and milkfish (Chanos chanos) serum) were compared in the preservation of milkfish sperm. Results showed milkfish serum to be the most suitable of the various extenders tested. This may be attributed to suitable osmotic potential and/or presence of proteins which may have directly or indirectly influenced sperm viability. The effects of milkfish serum on the motility and fertilizing capacity of sperm at different durations of storage however need to be investigated.
    • Article

      A comparison between the catching efficiency of two milkfish fry collecting gears and their respective modifications 

      GF Quinitio & G Kawamura - SEAFDEC Aquaculture Department Quarterly Research Report, 1980 - SEAFDEC Aquaculture Department
      An experiment was conducted along the shore of Culasi, Antique in Panay to compare the milkfry (Chanos chanos) catching efficiency of the ordinary fry seine against its innovation and the ordinary sweeper against its 2 modifications. Results show that it is possible to replace the wings of the presently used sweeper and the ends of the fry seine with a coarse-meshed netting. This improvement decreases the water resistance of the gears and thus enables fry gatherers to use larger ones thereby giving more catch.
    • Article

      A preliminary study on the growth and survival of stunted and non-stunted milkfish fingerlings 

      MN Lijauco, EG Griño, DD Gerochi & EM Rodriguez - SEAFDEC Aquaculture Department Quarterly Research Report, 1978 - SEAFDEC Aquaculture Department
      A study was conducted comparing the growth of stunted and non-stunted milkfish.
    • Article

      A statistical index of growth condition in an aquaculture experiment 

      RH Tan & IE de Mesa - SEAFDEC Aquaculture Department Quarterly Research Report, 1980 - SEAFDEC Aquaculture Department
      A simple statistical index, for evaluating the condition of growth in an aquaculture experiment and indicating the extent of effect of any plausible rival hypothesis, is presented.
    • magazineArticle

      Abalone 

      AP Surtida - SEAFDEC Asian Aquaculture, 2000 - SEAFDEC Aquaculture Department
    • Conference paper

      Abalone aquaculture for stock enhancement and community livelihood project in northern Palawan, Philippines 

      BJ Gonzales - In MRR Romana-Eguia, FD Parado-Estepa, ND Salayo & MJH Lebata-Ramos (Eds.), Resource Enhancement and Sustainable Aquaculture Practices in Southeast Asia: Challenges in Responsible Production … International Workshop on Resource Enhancement and Sustainable Aquaculture Practices in Southeast Asia 2014 (RESA), 2015 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
      One of the interventions to feed the poorest of the poor fisheries sector in the country is the provision of livelihood in the form of mariculture of high value marine species. In the Philippines, livelihood in rural areas is largely linked to resource depletion, hence it is wise not only to provide livelihood to the community but also to encourage them to conserve and enhance the resources. As part of the revised R&D program, the Western Philippines University partnered with NGO and existing projects to embark on a community-based environment-concerned livelihood project, using hatchery bred abalone, although top shell was also considered for stock enhancement. This is in an on-going project thus, preliminary phases such as abalone production and cage-based grow-out as well as subsequent project plans will be discussed. The objectives of this study were to: (a) share the implementing experiences in this project, (b) identify success and failure drivers of the project, (c) explain the conceptual framework for the MPA-based stock enhancement to be used in this project, and (d) give recommendations to improve the implementation and ensure the success of the project.

      The following activities have thus far been conducted: (a) development of criteria for cage micro-site selection; (b) writing of proposal and provision of financial assistance for hatchery juvenile production through a partnership MOA; (c) presentation of site survey results to beneficiaries and stake holders; (d) conduct of trainings on abalone grow out culture to POs; (e) development and improvement of training module; (f) signing of conservation agreement; (g) giving of cage materials and juveniles to people s organizations; (h) on site coaching; and (i) partial monitoring. The next activities include improvement in juvenile production, conduct of researches on abalone nutrition, and development of market and value chain flow analysis. The conceptual framework for community-managed stock enhancement will follow that of the Department of Environment and Natural Resources-ICRMP, of which the stock enhancement project is anchored on the management of marine protected areas or MPAs.

      The steps in all the activities were documented and while the project was in progress, performance of the participants in training were measured, the training module was improved, the training approaches were revised according to needs, and the growth and survival of juvenile abalone were monitored. The problems identified were low production of juveniles, insufficient food for grow-out, political squabbles, social preparation, and delay in implementation schedule. Recommendations to improve or resolve the problems encountered were also presented in this paper.
    • Image

      Abalone culture 

      SMA Buen-Ursua - 2007 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
      Conceptualized by SM Buen-Ursua (Abalone Project).
    • magazineArticle

      Abalone culture: a new business opportunity 

      WG Gallardo & ND Salayo - SEAFDEC Asian Aquaculture, 2003 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
      There are about 100 species of abalone in the world, but only 20 are of high commercial importance. In the Philippines, the abalone species are Haliotis asinina, H. varia, H. ovina and H.glabra, but it is the former which has high commercial value. The semi-processed abalone are frozen, dried or canned for export to many countries. An outline is given of the major aquaculture activities and duration of breeding and culture. Abalone hatchery production operations and investment costs and returns are detailed. Particular reference is made to the modular system of abalone culture in floating cages.