Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center, Aquaculture Department Institutional Repository (SAIR) is the official digital repository of scholarly and research information of the department. This is to enable the effective dissemination of AQD researchers' in-house and external publications for free and online. The repository uses DSpace, an open source software, developed at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Libraries. It is an Open Archives Initiative (OAI)-compliant.

Initially, the repository shall contain preprints, full-texts or abstracts of journal articles, books and conference proceedings written by SEAFDEC/AQD scientists and researchers. The aim is to promote these publications especially those published in international peer-reviewed journals and generate higher citation through increased visibility.

It will also provide free access to all in-house publications of SEAFDEC/AQD. Full-text digitized copies of fishfarmer-friendly materials like books, handbooks, policy guidebooks, conference proceedings, extension manuals, institutional reports, annual reports (AQD Highlights), and newsletters (SEAFDEC Asian Aquaculture, Aqua Farm News, AquaDept News and AQD Matters) can be retrieved and downloaded.

In the future, SAIR will expand its collection to include images, presentations, audios, and videos among others.

The objectives of the repository are to: (1) to provide reliable means for SEAFDEC/AQD researchers to store, preserve and share their research outputs and (2) to provide easy access and increase the visibility of SEAFDEC/AQD scientific publications

SAIR also aims to encourage SEAFDEC/AQD researchers for self-archiving and submitting pre-prints from which metadata will be screened and approved by the library staff.

  • Article

    Adsorption and biomass concentration of thraustochytrid Schizochytrium aggregatum (Goldstein and Belsky) in Bunker C Oil 

    BGS Sarinas, LD Gellada, MLT Torrigue, DN Sibonga, ES Torrato, JG Malagad, JG Feril, LAJ Bondoc, JCA Roncal & JA Tornalejo - Journal of Environmental Science and Management, 2014 - School of Environmental Science and Management, University of the Philippines Los Baños
    Diverse array of microorganisms such as bacteria, fungi and protists are involved during oil spill. Each microorganism has its own specific function whether it has to degrade or adsorb hydrocarbons. One important microorganism is the Thraustochytrid that is a fungoid protist and are common in marine and estuarine habitats. Numerous studies existed on the biodegradation and adsorption of Thraustochytrids on various substances but not on Bunker C oil. Thus, this study aimed to determine the adsorption capacity and mean biomass of Thraustochytrids in Bunker C oil using different cell densities measured in grams. All of the three treatments or cell densities (1 x 105 cells ml-1, 1 x 106 cells ml-1 and 1 x 107 cells ml-1) were triplicated and average values were recorded. Oil dispersant was used as a control. It showed that Thraustochytrid with 1 x 107 cells ml-1 showed the highest adsorbed oil (.057 ḡ) among the three cell densities and showed significant difference at p = .01 but comparable to the control (.066 ḡ). In terms of biomass concentration, all cell densities showed no significant difference at p = .01. Thraustochytrid is a promising tool during oil spill because it has the capacity to adsorb oil.

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  • Book chapter

    Sustainable milkfish production in marine fish cages through strong government support and effective public-private partnerships: a case study from Panabo City Mariculture Park in Davao del Norte, Philippines 

    FG Ayson, AM Ventura & EG de Jesus-Ayson - In W Miao & KK Lal (Eds.), Sustainable intensification of aquaculture in the Asia-Pacific region. Documentation of successful practices, 2016 - FAO Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific
    This case study presents the successful practice of sustainable intensification of milkfish aquaculture in marine fish cages under semi-intensive grow-out conditions in the Panabo City Mariculture Park (PCMP) in Davao del Norte, Philippines. Established in 2006, PCMP became operational through the promulgation of a City Ordinance declaring 1 075 hectares of municipal waters in Panabo City as a Mariculture Development Zone/Park. The operations of PCMP were so successful that in just five years it became the third largest among the 63 operational MPs in the Philippines during 2011, with 86 private investors-locators operating a total of 322 units of cages. At present, a total of 372 units of fish cages are operating in the mariculture park (MP). A combination of factors contributed to the successful operation of PCMP, but the success is usually attributed to the effective partnership between the government (both local and national) and the private sector. The Comprehensive MP City Ordinance that governs the PCMP is strictly implemented and includes, among others, the tenurial rights and access to locators. Regulations on distances between cages are strictly enforced and security measures in the total area are jointly undertaken by the government and the locators. The national government, through the Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources-National Mariculture Center (BFAR-NMC), provides technical support in all aspects from stocking to harvest during the production cycle. BFAR-NMC staff conduct regular periodic sampling of the stocks and compute feeding rates for the stocks which are implemented by the technicians/caretakers. Likewise, BFAR-NMC staff regularly monitor the water quality of the MP and the health status of the stocks. Since it became operational in 2006, the PCMP did not report a single incident of mass fish kill, which indicates that the technical guidelines of MP operations are strictly followed. Workers are trained and organized into groups by BFAR-NMC such as caretakers, cage framers, netters, harvesters, fish processors, and others, and actively participate in discussions related to MP operations to ensure protocols are properly followed. Harvests of stocks are done by skilled workers trained by BFAR-NMC, all done in the “Bagsakan Center” or fish landing area and are well-coordinated. The support facilities in the fish landing area are provided by both the local and national government and the PCMP Producers Association. The operators provide complete data for their operations to BFAR-NMC for record keeping. The strong partnership between the national government through BFAR-NMC, the local government unit, the investors, as well as the acceptance and support from the community for the PCMP is the hallmark of its success.
  • Article

    Embryonic and larval development of hatchery-reared silver therapon Leiopotherapon plumbeus (Perciformes: Terapontidae) 

    FA Aya, VSN Nillasca, LMB Garcia & Y Takagi - Ichthyological Research, 2016 - Springer Verlag
    The embryonic and larval development of hatchery-reared silver therapon Leiopotherapon plumbeus are described to provide essential information on the early life history of this species. Egg size, larval size at hatching, yolk resorption rate, onset of feeding and development of some morphological characters were examined. Fertilized eggs (430–610 µm in diameter) were spherical, yellowish, demersal and slightly adhesive. First cleavage occurred 6 min post-fertilization and embryos hatched 21–24 h post-fertilization under ambient temperature of 27.5 ± 0.1 °C. Newly hatched larvae [1.79 ± 0.04 mm in total length (TL)] with yolk volume of 0.579 ± 0.126 mm3 had no functional or pigmented eyes, mouth or digestive tract. The eyes became fully pigmented and mouth opened [31 and 36.5 hours post-hatching (hph)] shortly before yolk resorption at 39 hph and when larvae had grown to 2.65 ± 0.14 mm in TL. Some morphological characters such as total length, pre-anal length and eye diameter decreased following yolk resorption, which also coincided with the development of foraging capacities shortly before exogenous feeding was initiated. L. plumbeus larvae initiated exogenous feeding at 54 hph, indicating a short (15 h after yolk resorption) transitional feeding period. Larval growth at the early stages of development (54–72 hph) was rapid and steadily increased from 288 to 720 hph, when larvae, 12.05 ± 4.02 mm in TL, closely resembled the external characteristics of their adult conspecifics.
  • Article

    Impacts of aquaculture on fish biodiversity in the freshwater lake Laguna de Bay, Philippines 

    MLA Cuvin-Aralar - Lakes and Reservoirs: Research & Management, 2016 - Wiley
    Laguna de Bay is the largest inland water body in the Philippines, being used predominantly for aquaculture and open water fisheries. Aquaculture in the lake began decades ago, with many changes in the lake ecosystem having occurred since that time. Most dominant species for fish culture are introduced species. Other invasive species were also introduced to the lake as escapees from land-based aquaculture facilities. This study was conducted to monitor fish diversity in two adjacent, but distinctly different, sites in the lake, namely an open fishery area (OFS), with no adjacent aquaculture structures, and an aquaculture site (AQS), with cages for the culture of various commodities. Fish traps were installed at both sites, with the traps being sampled at least every 2 weeks from April 2013 to February 2015. The results of pairwise t-tests indicated significantly higher Shannon–Wiener diversity index (H′), evenness (J′), Simpson's similarity index (D) and species richness (s) in OFS than in AQS. In terms of total catch per day, significantly greater fish biomass were obtained from AQS than from OFS. Introduced aquaculture species had a mean dominance of 83% and 47% in AQS and OFS, respectively. However, invasive species introduced from the ornamental fish trade exhibited a mean relative dominance of 10.3% in AQS and 13.5% in OFS. The relative dominance of native species was also significantly higher in OFS (41%) than in AQS (6.5%). The results of this study demonstrated the adverse impacts of aquaculture in regard to the species diversity of fish in localized areas in Laguna de Bay. The dependency of aquaculture on introduced fish species adversely impacted the natural fish population in the lake. Focusing on the culture of commercially important local species for aquaculture, rather than introduced species, will improve fish production of inland waters without accompanying adverse impacts on biodiversity.
  • Conference paper

    Community-based stock enhancement of abalone, Haliotis asinina in Sagay marine reserve: Achievements, limitations and directions 

    ND Salayo, RJG Castel, RT Barrido, DHM Tormon & T Azuma - In K Hajime, T Iwata, Y Theparoonrat, N Manajit & VT Sulit (Eds.), Consolidating the Strategies for Fishery Resources Enhancement in Southeast Asia. Proceedings of the Symposium … Strategy for Fisheries Resources Enhancement in the Southeast Asian Region, Pattaya, Thailand, 27-30 July 2015, 2016 - Training Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
    The Sagay Marine Reserve (SMR) under the National Integrated Protected Area System (NIPAS) is one of the many reef areas in the Visayan Sea in the central part of the Philippine archipelago. The SMR covers 32,000 ha or 59% of coastal waters north of the mainland Sagay City. Donkey’s ear abalone is one of the most sought mollusks traded by small-scale fishers in Molocaboc Island located within the SMR. High buying prices in local and international markets compared with other fish catch motivated fishers to target abalone and caused its overfishing. SEAFDEC/AQD, with support from the Government of Japan Trust Fund (JTF), conducted a community-based stock enhancement through a tri-party collaboration between the fisherfolks of Molocaboc Island, the Sagay local government at the village and city levels, and SEAFDEC/AQD. The study showed that the decision and implementation of stock enhancement and the definition of its objectives and relevance involves the strong engagement with stakeholders. For over a period of eight years (2007-2014), we learned that stock enhancement necessarily involve high financial investments and enormous transaction cost over a long period of time which are often not affordable to local governments of coastal communities in Southeast Asia. Thus, community-based collaborations may help achieve enhancement and restocking goals.
  • Conference paper

    Fishery resource enhancement: An overview of the current situation and issues in the southeast Asian region 

    MJH Lebata-Ramos & EF Doyola-Solis - In K Hajime, T Iwata, Y Theparoonrat, N Manajit & VT Sulit (Eds.), Consolidating the Strategies for Fishery Resources Enhancement in Southeast Asia. Proceedings of the Symposium … Strategy for Fisheries Resources Enhancement in the Southeast Asian Region, Pattaya, Thailand, 27-30 July 2015, 2016 - Training Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
    The total global production from capture fisheries has plateaued since the mid 90s. This stagnation in production or reduced productivity of the world’s coastal and marine wild fisheries is caused by overfishing and degradation of habitats through coastal development and destructive fishing methods. Reports have shown that if the current fishing trends continue, all of the commercial fisheries will have collapsed by 2050. To boost production, scientists, fisheries managers, government agencies, and NGOs have been looking at ways of enhancing fish stocks. Replenishing depleted stocks may be done by regulating fishing effort, restoring degraded nursery and spawning habitats or through resource enhancement. Resource enhancement using individuals reared in aquaculture facilities or seed stocks abundant in the wild is becoming a popular method of supplementing depleted stocks. It is one of the many strategies that could help address the decreasing fisheries production in the wild. A brief history of resource enhancement, the aquatic species released in the different countries in the region, the reasons for releasing stocks, and the issues involved, are discussed briefly in this paper. Among the main reasons for resource enhancement are to increase production or enhance stocks and increase food supply and/or family income. Other reasons include protection of endemic and maintenance of endangered species, rehabilitation of degraded natural habitats and for recreation fisheries, among others. Age or size of seeds, seed quality, genetics, governance, economics, biodiversity conservation, politics, and the introduction of exotics are among the resource enhancement issues identified in the region.

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