Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center, Aquaculture Department Institutional Repository (SAIR) is the official digital repository of scholarly and research information of the department. This is to enable the effective dissemination of AQD researchers' in-house and external publications for free and online. The repository uses DSpace, an open source software, developed at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Libraries. It is an Open Archives Initiative (OAI)-compliant.

Initially, the repository shall contain preprints, full-texts or abstracts of journal articles, books and conference proceedings written by SEAFDEC/AQD scientists and researchers. The aim is to promote these publications especially those published in international peer-reviewed journals and generate higher citation through increased visibility.

It will also provide free access to all in-house publications of SEAFDEC/AQD. Full-text digitized copies of fishfarmer-friendly materials like books, handbooks, policy guidebooks, conference proceedings, extension manuals, institutional reports, annual reports (AQD Highlights), and newsletters (SEAFDEC Asian Aquaculture, Aqua Farm News, AquaDept News and AQD Matters) can be retrieved and downloaded.

In the future, SAIR will expand its collection to include images, presentations, audios, and videos among others.

The objectives of the repository are to: (1) to provide reliable means for SEAFDEC/AQD researchers to store, preserve and share their research outputs and (2) to provide easy access and increase the visibility of SEAFDEC/AQD scientific publications

SAIR also aims to encourage SEAFDEC/AQD researchers for self-archiving and submitting pre-prints from which metadata will be screened and approved by the library staff.

  • Article

    Effect of short-term immersion of Kappaphycus alvarezii (Doty) Doty in high nitrogen on the growth, nitrogen assimilation, carrageenan quality, and occurrence of “ice-ice” disease 

    MRJ Luhan, SS Avañcena & JP Mateo - Journal of Applied Phycology, 2015 - Springer Verlag
    Short-term immersion of Kappaphycus alvarezii (Doty) Doty in a high-nitrogen-containing medium was tested to increase growth, improve the quality of carrageenan, and decrease “ice-ice” disease occurrence. Tank-reared Kappaphycus were used as explants. Growth, nitrogen assimilation, carrageenan quality, and occurrence of ice-ice disease of enriched (E/N) K. alvarezii were determined. E/N and un-enriched (control) K. alvarezii were planted inside net cages in the sea. Nitrogen assimilation was monitored to determine if nitrogen was incorporated in the tissues after 12 h. Total thallus nitrogen of K. alvarezii doubled after immersion in high nitrogen. Growth rate and carrageenan yield of E/N K. alvarezii were significantly higher than those of the control. Gel strengths of E/N and the control were not significantly different. Ice-ice disease occurrence was significantly higher in the control than the enriched seaweeds. Short-term immersion of K. alvarezii in a high-nitrogen medium before outplanting increased growth rate and decreased the occurrence of “ice-ice”.

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  • Article

    Abdominal segment deformity syndrome (asds) and fused body segment deformity (fbsd) in cultured Penaeus indicus 

    The abdominal segment deformity disease (ASDD) is a new shrimp disease reported only in cultured Penaeus vannamei in Thailand. Shrimp with ASDD have deformed abdominal segment, jagged gut line and bumpy surfaces. Similar signs were observed in cultured P. indicus in the Philippines. However, aside from the signs described for ASDD, some P. indicus showing abdominal segment deformity syndrome (ASDS) had more severe deformities up to the extent that the number of body segments was reduced due to fusion. Shrimp with fused body segment deformity (FBSD) had four instead of five pairs of legs. To account the prevalence of the deformities in P. indicus, shrimp were classified into grossly normal shrimp (NS), shrimp with abdominal segment deformity syndrome (ASDS) and shrimp with fused segments (FBSD). Out of the shrimp sampled, 83.4 ± 5.4% was NS, 10.9 ± 6.2% was ASDS and 5.7 ± 3.0% was FBSD. Morphometric characteristics of the shrimp were measured. There was no significant difference in body weight (BW) among male and female NS, ASDS and FBSD. In both sexes, total length (TL) of FBSD was significantly shorter compared to NS and ASDS. Shrimp samples were also screened to be negative for known infectious viral diseases including white spot syndrome virus (WSSV), infectious hypodermal and haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHHNV), infectious myonecrosis virus (IMNV), P. vannamei nodavirus (PvNV), Macrobrachium rosenbergii nodavirus (MrNV) and Taura syndrome virus (TSV). Occurrence of ASDS and FBSD in post-larvae (PL) produced from captive and wild spawners were also determined. Based on a tank experiment, no significant difference was detected between the percentages of ASDS in PL produced from wild or captive spawners but FBSD was only noted in PL produced from the latter. Deformities generally did not affect the size of P. indicus except for the reduced length of shrimp with FBSD which when coupled with missing pleopods could lead to major economic loss for shrimp farmers if not addressed properly.
  • Article

    Colour discrimination in dim light by the larvae of the African catfish Clarias gariepinus 

    G Kawamura, T Bagarinao, PK Hoo, J Justin & LS Lim - Ichthyological Research, 2017 - Springer
    Many demersal fish species undergo vertical shifts in habitats during ontogeny especially after larval metamorphosis. The visual spectral sensitivity shifts with the habitat, indicating a change in colour vision. Colour vision depends on sufficient ambient light and becomes ineffective at a particular low light intensity. It is not known how fishes see colour in dim light. By means of a behavioural experiment on larval African catfish Clarias gariepinus in the laboratory, we determined colour vision and colour discrimination in dim light. Light-adapted larvae were subjected to classical conditioning to associate a reward feed with a green or a red stimulus placed among 7 shades of grey. The larvae learned this visual task after 70 and 90 trials. A different batch of larvae were trained to discriminate between green and red and then tested for the ability to discriminate between these colours, as the light intensity was reduced. The larvae learned this visual task after 110 trials in bright light and were able to discriminate colours, as light was dimmed until 0.01 lx, the minimal illuminance measurable in this study, and similar to starlight. The retinae of the larvae were found to be light adapted at 0.01 lx; thus indicating cone-based colour vision at this illuminance. For comparison, three human subjects were tested under similar conditions and showed a colour vision threshold at between 1.5 and 0.1 lx. For the larvae of C. gariepinus, the ability of colour discrimination in dim light is probably due to its retinal tapetum, which could increase the sensitivity of cones.
  • Article

    Biomass production, proximate composition and fatty acid profile of the local marine thraustochytrid isolate, Schizochytrium sp. LEY7 using low-cost substrates at optimum culture conditions 

    G Ludevese-Pascual, M Dela Peña & J Tornalejo - Aquaculture Research, 2016 - John Wiley and Sons
    This study was conducted to investigate low-cost substrate alternative and the optimum culture conditions in mass producing the local marine thraustochytrid, Schizochytrium sp. LEY7 isolated from the mangrove leaves of Baybay, Southern Leyte Philippines. Results showed that Schizochytrium sp. LEY7 is able to utilize commercial grade glucose and yeast extract from NaCl-treated baker's yeast as source of carbon and micronutrients respectively. Cost of mass producing the thraustochytrid isolate using the alternative production substrates was substantially reduced. Incubation temperature and salinity levels were the two growth factors significantly affecting the biomass production of the isolate. The short duration of lag phase shown by the isolate suggests a growth advantage in that cells are readily able to adapt to their new environment. Total lipids averaged to 19.4%. Principal fatty acids were palmitic acid (C16:0) with 33.52% and docosahexanoic acid (DHA, C22:6n-3) with 39.92% proportion to total fatty acid. Eicosapentaenoic (C20:5n-3, 1.01%) and arachidonic (C20:4n-3, 0.90%) are present but in relatively lower amount. Our findings showed the potential of low-cost substrate in mass producing the local thraustochytrid isolate, Schizochytrium sp. LEY7 as lipid and polyunsaturated fatty acid source in aquaculture. Biomass production was enhanced by optimizing the culture conditions.
  • Article

    Acute toxicity of water-accommodated fraction and chemically enhanced WAF of bunker C oil and dispersant to a microalga Tetraselmis tetrathele 

    SS Santander-Avanceña, RB Sadaba, HS Taberna Jr., GT Tayo & J Koyama - Bulletin of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology, 2016 - Springer Verlag
    This study assessed the toxicity of water-accommodated fraction (WAF) and chemically enhanced WAF (CEWAF) of bunker C oil and dispersant (DISP) to a microalga, Tetraselmis tetrathele. The 72-h median effective concentration (72-h EC50) of CEWAF and DISP were determined at 3.30 % and 2.40 %, respectively. The no observed effect concentration (NOEC) of CEWAF to T. tetrathele was at 2.0 % and lowest observed effect concentration (LOEC) was at 3.0 % while NOEC and LOEC of DISP to T. tetrathele were determined at 1.0 % and 2.0 %, respectively. The addition of dispersant to oil increased the amount of total PAH present in the CEWAF test solutions. DISP alone was highly toxic, and the toxicity of CEWAF was primarily caused by the presence of dispersant.
  • Conference paper

    Status of transboundary diseases of penaeid shrimps in Singapore 

    Y Wong & J Jiang - In RV Pakingking Jr., EGT de Jesus-Ayson & BO Acosta (Eds.), Addressing Acute Hepatopancreatic Necrosis Disease (AHPND) and Other Transboundary Diseases for Improved Aquatic … Diseases for Improved Aquatic Animal Health in Southeast Asia, 22-24 February 2016, Makati City, Philippines, 2016 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
    Singapore has a small shrimp farming industry with approximately 54 metric tons (MT) of shrimps produced in one year from both land and coastal farms. There is also one shrimp farm producing broodstock for export. Singapore has the capability to diagnose acute hepatopancreatic necrosis disease (AHPND) through histopathology and the isolation of its causal agent which is Vibrio parahaemolyticus. The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method for AHPND detection in shrimp is currently being undertaken to further strengthen its laboratory and diagnostic capacity. Notably, Singapore is still AHPND-free. On the contrary, white spot disease caused by white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is a disease of concern as it affects the trade for ornamental crustaceans. Singapore has an active surveillance program for WSSV and other transboundary pathogens of penaeid shrimps. Positive detections would be followed by movement controls and stamping out protocols.

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