Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center, Aquaculture Department Institutional Repository (SAIR) is the official digital repository of scholarly and research information of the department. This is to enable the effective dissemination of AQD researchers' in-house and external publications for free and online. The repository uses DSpace, an open source software, developed at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Libraries. It is an Open Archives Initiative (OAI)-compliant.

Initially, the repository shall contain preprints, full-texts or abstracts of journal articles, books and conference proceedings written by SEAFDEC/AQD scientists and researchers. The aim is to promote these publications especially those published in international peer-reviewed journals and generate higher citation through increased visibility.

It will also provide free access to all in-house publications of SEAFDEC/AQD. Full-text digitized copies of fishfarmer-friendly materials like books, handbooks, policy guidebooks, conference proceedings, extension manuals, institutional reports, annual reports (AQD Highlights), and newsletters (SEAFDEC Asian Aquaculture, Aqua Farm News, AquaDept News and AQD Matters) can be retrieved and downloaded.

In the future, SAIR will expand its collection to include images, presentations, audios, and videos among others.

The objectives of the repository are to: (1) to provide reliable means for SEAFDEC/AQD researchers to store, preserve and share their research outputs and (2) to provide easy access and increase the visibility of SEAFDEC/AQD scientific publications

SAIR also aims to encourage SEAFDEC/AQD researchers for self-archiving and submitting pre-prints from which metadata will be screened and approved by the library staff.

  • Article

    The use of potassium permanganate against trichodiniasis on milkfish (Chanos chanos) fingerlings 

    PA Palma, ER Cruz-Lacierda & VL Corre Jr. - Bulletin of the European Association of Fish Pathologists, 2015 - European Association of Fish Pathologists
    Trichodiniasis was noted in an intensive milkfish (Chanos chanos) nursery pond in Dumangas, Iloilo, Philippines. It was predominantly caused by a small trichodinid species (body diameter=23-29 µm) with well-developed denticles, identified as Paratrichodina sp. The trichodinid infection resulted in proliferative changes, including clubbing and epithelial hyperplasis of the gill lamellae sufficient to disrupt respiratory function. Tolerance tests of milkfish fingerlings in an earthen pond-simulated environment resulted in a 24 h TL90 value of 1.98 ± 0.25 ppm KMnO4. A treatment of 1.0 ppm KMnO4 was highly efficacious (96%) in eliminating trichodinids on gills with minimal mortality of treated milkfish observed 24 hours post-treatment.

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  • Article

    Abdominal segment deformity syndrome (asds) and fused body segment deformity (fbsd) in cultured Penaeus indicus 

    The abdominal segment deformity disease (ASDD) is a new shrimp disease reported only in cultured Penaeus vannamei in Thailand. Shrimp with ASDD have deformed abdominal segment, jagged gut line and bumpy surfaces. Similar signs were observed in cultured P. indicus in the Philippines. However, aside from the signs described for ASDD, some P. indicus showing abdominal segment deformity syndrome (ASDS) had more severe deformities up to the extent that the number of body segments was reduced due to fusion. Shrimp with fused body segment deformity (FBSD) had four instead of five pairs of legs. To account the prevalence of the deformities in P. indicus, shrimp were classified into grossly normal shrimp (NS), shrimp with abdominal segment deformity syndrome (ASDS) and shrimp with fused segments (FBSD). Out of the shrimp sampled, 83.4 ± 5.4% was NS, 10.9 ± 6.2% was ASDS and 5.7 ± 3.0% was FBSD. Morphometric characteristics of the shrimp were measured. There was no significant difference in body weight (BW) among male and female NS, ASDS and FBSD. In both sexes, total length (TL) of FBSD was significantly shorter compared to NS and ASDS. Shrimp samples were also screened to be negative for known infectious viral diseases including white spot syndrome virus (WSSV), infectious hypodermal and haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHHNV), infectious myonecrosis virus (IMNV), P. vannamei nodavirus (PvNV), Macrobrachium rosenbergii nodavirus (MrNV) and Taura syndrome virus (TSV). Occurrence of ASDS and FBSD in post-larvae (PL) produced from captive and wild spawners were also determined. Based on a tank experiment, no significant difference was detected between the percentages of ASDS in PL produced from wild or captive spawners but FBSD was only noted in PL produced from the latter. Deformities generally did not affect the size of P. indicus except for the reduced length of shrimp with FBSD which when coupled with missing pleopods could lead to major economic loss for shrimp farmers if not addressed properly.
  • Article

    Nutritional evaluation of distiller's dried grain with soluble as replacement to soybean meal in diets of milkfish, Chanos chanos and its effect on fish performance and intestinal morphology 

    REP Mamauag, JA Ragaza & TJ Nacionales - Aquaculture Nutrition, 2017 - Wiley
    A 90-day feeding trial was conducted on milkfish, Chanos chanos with an initial mean body weight of 3.07 ± 0.17 g (mean ± standard error of mean). Six treatment diets were formulated to contain 0 g/kg (Diet 1), 150 g/kg (Diet 2), 25 g/kg (Diet 3), 300 g/kg (Diet 4), 350 g/kg (Diet 5) and 450 g/kg (Diet 6) distiller's dried grain with soluble (DDGS). All the dietary treatments were isonitrogenous (350 g/kg crude protein) and isolipidic (6% crude lipid). Result of the feeding trial indicated that growth rates, feed intake and feed efficiency were not significantly (p > .05) affected by inclusion levels of DDGS by up to 450 g/kg in the feed. Proximate body composition (crude protein, crude lipid, ash, fibre) in fish fed the dietary treatments were not significantly (p > .05) affected as well. The DDGS when used as a milkfish ingredient has a protein digestibility of 910 g/kg, fat disgetsibility of 850 g/kg, carbohydrate digestibility of 750 g/kg and a dry matter digestibility of 520 g/kg Results from the intestinal morphology displayed no apparent pathological changes in the digestive tract of fish fed all dietary treatments. These results indicate that DDGS can be efficiently utilized by milkfish by up to 450 g/kg without negatively affecting performance parameters and intestinal morphology.
  • Article

    Growth and feed performance, digestibility and acute stress response of juvenile grouper (Epinephelus fuscoguttatus) fed diets with hydrolysate from milkfish offal 

    REP Mamauag & JA Ragaza - Aquaculture Research, 2017 - Wiley
    Nutritional qualities of fish processing by-products can further be improved through enzymatic hydrolysis. The objective of this study was to elucidate the efficacy of hydrolysed milkfish offal at different inclusion levels when fed to juvenile grouper, Epinephelus fuscoguttatus, with an initial body weight of 2.88 ± 0.06 g. The animals were fed for 56 days with seven diets supplemented with 0 (control), 5%, 15% and 25% of milkfish offal (MO) and milkfish offal hydrolysate (MOH). The diets were formulated to be isonitrogenous (45%) and isolipidic (11%). The diets were assigned to 21 tanks (15 fish per tank) with each diet having three replicates. Results from the experimental trials indicated that feed conversion efficiency, feed intake and weight gain of fish significantly (P < 0.05) improved when fed diets with MOH. No significant differences within the rest of the dietary treatments were observed. Survival rate (>90%) did not differ in all the dietary treatments. Proximate composition (crude protein, crude fat and ash) indicated no significant difference among fish fed from all the dietary treatments. Apparent digestibility of MOH indicated a 95% and 66% digestibility for protein and dry matter respectively. Plasma stress parameters (cortisol and glucose) were not influenced by the dietary treatment when fish were subjected to an acute stressor (5-min chasing). Liver morphology indicated normal hepatocyte shape and the presence of lipid droplets in fish fed from all the dietary treatments. The results indicated that milkfish offal processed as hydrolysate can be utilized in grouper diets and can promote growth and feed efficiency when supplied at 10–15%.
  • Article

    Colour discrimination in dim light by the larvae of the African catfish Clarias gariepinus 

    G Kawamura, T Bagarinao, PK Hoo, J Justin & LS Lim - Ichthyological Research, 2017 - Springer
    Many demersal fish species undergo vertical shifts in habitats during ontogeny especially after larval metamorphosis. The visual spectral sensitivity shifts with the habitat, indicating a change in colour vision. Colour vision depends on sufficient ambient light and becomes ineffective at a particular low light intensity. It is not known how fishes see colour in dim light. By means of a behavioural experiment on larval African catfish Clarias gariepinus in the laboratory, we determined colour vision and colour discrimination in dim light. Light-adapted larvae were subjected to classical conditioning to associate a reward feed with a green or a red stimulus placed among 7 shades of grey. The larvae learned this visual task after 70 and 90 trials. A different batch of larvae were trained to discriminate between green and red and then tested for the ability to discriminate between these colours, as the light intensity was reduced. The larvae learned this visual task after 110 trials in bright light and were able to discriminate colours, as light was dimmed until 0.01 lx, the minimal illuminance measurable in this study, and similar to starlight. The retinae of the larvae were found to be light adapted at 0.01 lx; thus indicating cone-based colour vision at this illuminance. For comparison, three human subjects were tested under similar conditions and showed a colour vision threshold at between 1.5 and 0.1 lx. For the larvae of C. gariepinus, the ability of colour discrimination in dim light is probably due to its retinal tapetum, which could increase the sensitivity of cones.
  • Article

    Embryonic and larval development of hatchery-reared silver therapon Leiopotherapon plumbeus (Perciformes: Terapontidae) 

    FA Aya, VSN Nillasca, LMB Garcia & Y Takagi - Ichthyological Research, 2016 - Springer Verlag
    The embryonic and larval development of hatchery-reared silver therapon Leiopotherapon plumbeus are described to provide essential information on the early life history of this species. Egg size, larval size at hatching, yolk resorption rate, onset of feeding and development of some morphological characters were examined. Fertilized eggs (430–610 µm in diameter) were spherical, yellowish, demersal and slightly adhesive. First cleavage occurred 6 min post-fertilization and embryos hatched 21–24 h post-fertilization under ambient temperature of 27.5 ± 0.1 °C. Newly hatched larvae [1.79 ± 0.04 mm in total length (TL)] with yolk volume of 0.579 ± 0.126 mm3 had no functional or pigmented eyes, mouth or digestive tract. The eyes became fully pigmented and mouth opened [31 and 36.5 hours post-hatching (hph)] shortly before yolk resorption at 39 hph and when larvae had grown to 2.65 ± 0.14 mm in TL. Some morphological characters such as total length, pre-anal length and eye diameter decreased following yolk resorption, which also coincided with the development of foraging capacities shortly before exogenous feeding was initiated. L. plumbeus larvae initiated exogenous feeding at 54 hph, indicating a short (15 h after yolk resorption) transitional feeding period. Larval growth at the early stages of development (54–72 hph) was rapid and steadily increased from 288 to 720 hph, when larvae, 12.05 ± 4.02 mm in TL, closely resembled the external characteristics of their adult conspecifics.

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