Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center, Aquaculture Department Institutional Repository (SAIR) is the official digital repository of scholarly and research information of the department. This is to enable the effective dissemination of AQD researchers' in-house and external publications for free and online. The repository uses DSpace, an open source software, developed at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Libraries. It is an Open Archives Initiative (OAI)-compliant.

Initially, the repository shall contain preprints, full-texts or abstracts of journal articles, books and conference proceedings written by SEAFDEC/AQD scientists and researchers. The aim is to promote these publications especially those published in international peer-reviewed journals and generate higher citation through increased visibility.

It will also provide free access to all in-house publications of SEAFDEC/AQD. Full-text digitized copies of fishfarmer-friendly materials like books, handbooks, policy guidebooks, conference proceedings, extension manuals, institutional reports, annual reports (AQD Highlights), and newsletters (SEAFDEC Asian Aquaculture, Aqua Farm News, AquaDept News and AQD Matters) can be retrieved and downloaded.

In the future, SAIR will expand its collection to include images, presentations, audios, and videos among others.

The objectives of the repository are to: (1) to provide reliable means for SEAFDEC/AQD researchers to store, preserve and share their research outputs and (2) to provide easy access and increase the visibility of SEAFDEC/AQD scientific publications

SAIR also aims to encourage SEAFDEC/AQD researchers for self-archiving and submitting pre-prints from which metadata will be screened and approved by the library staff.

Select a community to browse its collections.

  • Article

    Enriched Ulva pertusa as partial replacement of the combined fish and soybean meals in juvenile abalone Haliotis asinina (Linnaeus) diet 

    R Santizo-Taan, M Bautista-Teruel & JRH Maquirang - Journal of Applied Phycology, 2019 - Springer Verlag
    The potential of enriched Ulva pertusa meal as feed ingredient in abalone juveniles, Haliotis asinina was evaluated. Four isonitrogenous and isolipidic diets were formulated which contain 27% protein and 5% lipid. Enriched U. pertusa meal replaced 0% (control), 10%, 20%, and 30% of protein from fish and soybean meals in the formulated diets. Thirty randomly selected abalone juveniles with average weight and shell length of 0.45 g ± 0.01 and 12.71 mm ± 0.01, respectively, were placed in each of the twelve 60-L oval fiberglass tanks equipped with a flow-through seawater system. Abalone were given diets at 3–5% body weight daily for 120 days in three replicate samples. Results showed no significant differences (p > 0.05) in percent weight gain, shell length, specific growth rate, feed conversion ratio, and protein efficiency ratio even up to 30% replacement level. Apparent dry matter digestibility of U. pertusa meal in abalone diet was 92%. Crude protein content of the abalone fed diets 1 (10% enriched U. pertusa meal) and 3 (30% enriched U. pertusa meal) was significantly (p < 0.05) higher than those fed on basal diet. Enriched U. pertusa meal can partially replace fish and soybean meals as protein source in formulated diets for abalone, Haliotis asinina juveniles.
  • Article

    Draft genome sequence of Vibrio parahaemolyticus strain PH1339, which causes acute hepatopancreatic necrosis disease in shrimp in the Philippines 

    SMU Penir, LD dela Pena, NAR Cabillon, ADP Bilbao, EC Amar & CP Saloma - Microbiology Resource Announcements, 2019 - American Society for Microbiology
    We report the first draft genome sequence of an acute hepatopancreatic necrosis disease (AHPND)-causing Vibrio parahaemolyticus strain isolated from a Penaeus vannamei sample from the Philippines. The strain carries the genes encoding the Pir-like toxin pair PirAvp and PirBvp.
  • Article

    Effects of replacing dietary fish oil with beef tallow on growth performance, serological parameters, and fatty acid composition in juvenile olive flounder, Paralichthys olivaceus 

    S Lee, FA Aya, S Won, A Hamidoghli & SC Bai - Journal of the World Aquaculture Society, 2019 - Wiley
    This study evaluated the effects of replacing fish oil (FO) with beef tallow (BT) in juvenile olive flounder, Paralichthys olivaceus (3.93 ± 0.07 g), over 8 weeks. Seven diets, consisting of 0, 25, 50, 75, and 100% replacement of FO with BT and 63 and 75.9% replacement supplemented with docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) at 0.9 and 1.1% of 100 g diet, respectively, were distributed into 21 tanks in a semi‐recirculation system with 15 fish per tank. The replacement of FO with BT at the given levels showed no significant changes (p > .05) in growth performance and whole‐body proximate composition. Fish fed the diet of 75.9% replacement with 1.1% DHA supplementation showed the best performance in these measurements among the treatments. Plasma glutamic pyruvic transaminase, cholesterol, high‐ and low‐density lipoproteins, and total protein were not significantly influenced by the replacement of FO with BT. The FO replacement generally resulted in a reduction of eicosapentaenoic acid, DHA, and n‐3/n‐6 polyunsaturated fatty acid ratio in the whole body, whereas the DHA supplementation recovered the level of DHA and the n‐3/n‐6 ratio to those observed in the group fed the 0% replacement diet. Taken together, BT along with DHA supplementation can potentially be a cost‐effective alternative for FO in olive flounder culture.
  • Article

    A review of reported seaweed diseases and pests in aquaculture in Asia 

    GM Ward, JP Faisan, EJ Cottier‐Cook, C Gachon, AQ Hurtado, PE Lim, I Matoju, FE Msuya, D Bass & J Brodie - Journal of the World Aquaculture Society, 2019 - Wiley
    Seaweeds have been used as a food for centuries in Asia and are increasingly exploited as a source for dietary supplements, animal feed, chemicals, and biofuels. In recent years, there has been an increase in the prevalence of diseases and pests in these aquaculture crops, with a subsequent reduction in their quantity and commercial value. In this article, we review diseases that have been reported in the scientific literature for species of red and brown seaweeds. We have focused on the major seaweed crops grown in Asia, where much of this production is centered. We also provide information on disease management and biosecurity and some observations on future directions.
  • Article

    A new species of the sanguinea-group Quatrefages, 1866 (Annelida: Eunicidae: Marphysa) from the Philippines 

    CJ Glasby, MAE Mandario, I Burghardt, E Kupriyanova, LM Gunton & PA Hutchings - Zootaxa, 2019 - Magnolia Press
    A new species of the Marphysa sanguinea group, M. iloiloensis n. sp. (Annelida: Eunicida: Eunicidae), is described from the Marine Annelids Hatchery of the Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center, Aquaculture Department (SEAFDEC- AQD), Iloilo Province, Philippines. It represents the first record of this group in the Philippines. The new species is most similar morphologically to M. hongkongensa Wang, Zhang & Qiu, 2018, but can be distinguished from it by having fewer branchial filaments, a pair of faint eyes (absent in M. hongkongensa), and in slight differences in jaw morphology and chaetation. The embryos of the new species develop inside a jelly cocoon attached to the entrance of the adult burrow; this is the first time that egg-containing cocoons have been found in any species of the sanguinea-group. Phylogenetic analysis based on the mitochondrial gene cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) revealed that Marphysa iloiloensis n. sp. is genetically distinct from all other analysed Marphysa species and forms a sister group to M. hongkongensa. A revised identification key to members of the sanguinea-group in Southeast Asia is provided.

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