Recent Submissions

  • Book

    2015 SEAFDEC/AQD Highlights 

    Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center - 2016 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
    The SEAFDEC Aquaculture Department is mandated to: 1) conduct scientific research to generate aquaculture technologies appropriate for Southeast Asia; 2) develop managerial, technical and skilled manpower for the aquaculture sector; and, 3) disseminate and exchange aquaculture information. The Aquaculture Department in the Philippines maintains 4 stations: the Tigbauan Main Station and Dumangas Brackishwater Station in Iloilo; the Igang Marine Station in Guimaras; and, the Binangonan Freshwater Station in Rizal. Highlights are provided of the seven research programmes and activities conducted by the department during the year 2015.
  • Book

    2014 SEAFDEC/AQD Highlights 

    Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center - 2015 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
    The SEAFDEC Aquaculture Department is mandated to: 1) conduct scientific research to generate aquaculture technologies appropriate for Southeast Asia; 2) develop managerial, technical and skilled manpower for the aquaculture sector; and, 3) disseminate and exchange aquaculture information. The Aquaculture Department in the Philippines maintains 4 stations: the Tigbauan Main Station and Dumangas Brackishwater Station in Iloilo; the Igang Marine Station in Guimaras; and, the Binangonan Freshwater Station in Rizal. Highlights are provided of the seven research programmes and activities conducted by the department during the year 2014.
  • Book

    2013 SEAFDEC/AQD highlights 

    Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center - 2014 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
    The SEAFDEC Aquaculture Department is mandated to: 1) conduct scientific research to generate aquaculture technologies appropriate for Southeast Asia; 2) develop managerial, technical and skilled manpower for the aquaculture sector; and, 3) disseminate and exchange aquaculture information. The Aquaculture Department in the Philippines maintains 4 stations: the Tigbauan Main Station and Dumangas Brackishwater Station in Iloilo; the Igang Marine Station in Guimaras; and, the Binangonan Freshwater Station in Rizal. Highlights are provided of the seven research programmes and activities conducted by the department during the year 2013.
  • Book

    2012 SEAFDEC/AQD highlights 

    Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center - 2013 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
    The SEAFDEC Aquaculture Department is mandated to: 1) conduct scientific research to generate aquaculture technologies appropriate for Southeast Asia; 2) develop managerial, technical and skilled manpower for the aquaculture sector; and, 3) disseminate and exchange aquaculture information. The Aquaculture Department in the Philippines maintains 4 stations: the Tigbauan Main Station and Dumangas Brackishwater Station in Iloilo; the Igang Marine Station in Guimaras; and, the Binangonan Freshwater Station in Rizal. Highlights are provided of the seven research programmes and activities conducted by the department during the year 2012.
  • Book

    2011 SEAFDEC/AQD highlights 

    Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center - 2012 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
    The SEAFDEC Aquaculture Department is mandated to: 1) conduct scientific research to generate aquaculture technologies appropriate for Southeast Asia; 2) develop managerial, technical and skilled manpower for the aquaculture sector; and, 3) disseminate and exchange aquaculture information. The Aquaculture Department in the Philippines maintains 4 stations: the Tigbauan Main Station and Dumangas Brackishwater Station in Iloilo; the Igang Marine Station in Guimaras; and, the Binangonan Freshwater Station in Rizal. Highlights are provided of the seven research programmes and activities conducted by the department during the year 2011.
  • Book

    SEAFDEC/AQD highlights 2010 

    SEAFDEC Aquaculture Department - 2011 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
    The SEAFDEC Aquaculture Department is mandated to: 1) conduct scientific research to generate aquaculture technologies appropriate for Southeast Asia; 2) develop managerial, technical and skilled manpower for the aquaculture sector; and, 3) disseminate and exchange aquaculture information. The Aquaculture Department in the Philippines maintains 4 stations: the Tigbauan Main Station and Dumangas Brackishwater Station in Iloilo; the Igang Marine Station in Guimaras; and, the Binangonan Freshwater Station in Rizal. Highlights are provided of the seven research programmes and activities conducted by the department during the year 2010.
  • Book

    SEAFDEC/AQD highlights 2009 

    SEAFDEC Aquaculture Department - 2010 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
    The SEAFDEC Aquaculture Department is mandated to: 1) conduct scientific research to generate aquaculture technologies appropriate for Southeast Asia; 2) develop managerial, technical and skilled manpower for the aquaculture sector; and, 3) disseminate and exchange aquaculture information. The Aquaculture Department in the Philippines maintains 4 stations: the Tigbauan Main Station and Dumangas Brackishwater Station in Iloilo; the Igang Marine Station in Guimaras; and, the Binangonan Freshwater Station in Rizal. Highlights are provided of the seven research programmes and activities conducted by the department during the year 2009.
  • Serial | Book

    SEAFDEC/AQD highlights 2008 

    SEAFDEC Aquaculture Department - 2009 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
    The SEAFDEC Aquaculture Department is mandated to: 1) promote and undertake aquaculture research that is relevant and appropriate for the region; 2) develop human resources for the region; and, 3) disseminate and exchange information in aquaculture. The Aquaculture Department in the Philippines maintains 4 stations: in Iloilo Province, the Tigbauan Main Station and Dumangas Brackishwater Station; in Guimaras, the Igang Marine Station; and, in Rizal, the Binangonan Freshwater Substation. Highlights are provided of the research programmes and activities conducted by the department during the year 2008.
  • Serial | Book

    SEAFDEC/AQD highlights 2007 

    SEAFDEC Aquaculture Department - 2008 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
    The SEAFDEC Aquaculture Department is mandated to: 1) promote and undertake aquaculture research that is relevant and appropriate for the region; 2) develop human resources for the region; and, 3) disseminate and exchange information in aquaculture. The Aquaculture Department in the Philippines maintains 4 stations: in Iloilo Province, the Tigbauan Main Station and Dumangas Brackishwater Station; in Guimaras, the Igang Marine Station; and, in Rizal, the Binangonan Freshwater Substation. Highlights are provided of the research programmes and activities conducted by the department during the year 2007.
  • Serial | Book

    SEAFDEC/AQD highlights 2006 

    Anon. - 2007 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center (SEAFDEC/AQD)
    The SEAFDEC Aquaculture Department is mandated to: 1) promote and undertake aquaculture research that is relevant and appropriate for the region; 2) develop human resources for the region; and, 3) disseminate and exchange information in aquaculture. The Aquaculture Department in the Philippines maintains 4 stations: in Iloilo Province, the Tigbauan Main Station and Dumangas Brackishwater Station; in Guimaras, the Igang Marine Station; and, in Rizal, the Binangonan Freshwater Substation. Highlights are provided of the research programmes and activities conducted by the department during the year 2006.
  • Book

    AQD highlights 2005 

    Anon. - 2006 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
    The SEAFDEC Aquaculture Department is mandated to: 1) promote and undertake aquaculture research that is relevant and appropriate for the region; 2) develop human resources for the region; and, 3) disseminate and exchange information in aquaculture. The Aquaculture Department in the Philippines maintains 4 stations: in Iloilo Province, the Tigbauan Main Station and Dumangas Brackishwater Station; in Guimaras, the Igang Marine Station; and, in Rizal, the Binangonan Freshwater Substation. Highlights are provided of the research programmes and activities conducted by the department during the year 2005.
  • Book chapter

    Progress of the mangrove-friendly shrimp culture project as of August 2004. 

    RR Platon - 2005 - SEAFDEC Aquaculture Department
    The Aquaculture Department (AQD) of the Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center (SEAFDEC) implemented in 1998 a five-year Mangrove-Friendly Aquaculture Program covering the culture of various organisms (fishes, crustaceans and mollusks) that could have effects on the mangroves. Upon the recommendation of the 22nd SEAFDEC Program Committee in 1999, the Program was revised to focus on the effects of shrimp culture on mangroves and was placed under the FCG collaborative mechanism.

    Thus, starting in early 2000 the Program on the Promotion of Mangrove-Friendly Shrimp Aquaculture in Southeast Asia: Mangrove-Friendly Shrimp Culture Project was implemented giving due focus on shrimp and adopting the major approaches, namely verification and pilot demonstration, research, training, and information dissemination.

    The improved practices in shrimp culture in Thailand and in the Philippines served as basis for the technology verification and demonstration activities. These experiences were documented in the form of state-of-the-art manuals.
  • Book chapter

    Regional technical consultation 

    Anon. - 2005 - SEAFDEC Aquaculture Department
    The Mangrove Friendly Aquaculture Program, conceived by the Aquaculture Department (AQD) of the Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center (SEAFDEC) in 1998, refocused its thrust on mangrove-friendly shrimp aquaculture as a response to the growing concern on the loss of mangroves in the region, which has been attributed to the fast development of the shrimp aquaculture industry. Funded by the Japanese Trust Fund, the Five-year Mangrove-Friendly Shrimp Culture Project (MFSCP) implemented in 2000-2004 has as one of its goals, the formulation of the Regional Code of Practice for Responsible Aquaculture in Mangrove Ecosystems.

    SEAFDEC/AQD started implementing the Mangrove-Friendly Shrimp Culture Project in mid-2000 under the ASEAN-SEAFDEC Fisheries Consultative Group (FCG) collaborative mechanism. A series of workshops and training sessions have been conducted in the region to promote the conservation and preservation of the mangroves while transferring developed shrimp culture technologies that are environment-friendly, to the countries in the region.

    The first MFSCP workshop, held in Iloilo City, Philippines in 2000, aimed to assess the status of utilization of the region’s mangrove areas for aquaculture. The workshop identified problems encountered in such aquaculture activities, and came up with recommendations and strategies on sustainable aquaculture in mangrove areas, most of which were incorporated in the Project Framework. The MFSCP comprises four major activities, namely, pilot demonstration and verification, research, training, and information dissemination. A Mid-Project Workshop was convened in September 2001 in Bangkok, Thailand to review the progress and assess the problems encountered in the implementation of the Project.
  • Book chapter

    Foreword. 

    RR Platon - 2005 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center (SEAFDEC/AQD)
  • Book chapter

    Preliminary pages 

    Anon. - 2005 - SEAFDEC Aquaculture Department
  • Book chapter

    SEAFDEC resolution and plan of action 

    Anon. - 2005 - SEAFDEC Aquaculture Department
  • Book chapter

    Mangroves management and development in the Philippines. 

    DM Melana, EE Melana & AM Mapalo - 2005 - SEAFDEC Aquaculture Department
    Filipinos whose main daily diet consists of fish and rice, are highly dependent on the coastal resources. The development of coastal resources in the Philippines has been traditionally exploitative in nature. Government policies, which dictated development in both the uplands and coastal areas, have been based mainly on abundant available resources without due consideration for sustainability.

    In the 1950s, vast tracts of mangroves were awarded to concessionaires and logged over for firewood and tanbarks. Mangrove woods were the preferred fuel source in coastal villages and most bakeries because of its high heating value, but a greater volume was exported to Japan as firewood but reportedly became the source of rayon. In the 1960s, the government adopted a policy aimed at increasing fish production by converting large areas of mangroves into fishponds for the culture of milkfish (Chanos chanos) and shrimps. Such policy was promoted by a government program, which classified mangrove timberland for fishpond development and opened loan windows in most government banks to finance fishpond development.

    It was only towards the end of the 1970s when the government realized the fishery value of mangroves. A National Mangrove Committee was formed in the then Ministry of Natural Resources, and a Mangrove Forest Research Center was created under the Forest Research Institute of the Philippines. The former was charged with the formulation of policies/recommendations for the conservation and sustainable management of the remaining mangrove forests in the country, while the latter worked for the generation of technology for the rehabilitation, production and sustainable management of mangroves. Not surprisingly, this “decade of awakening” was also significantly marked with an alarming decline in fish catch.

    The government then opened loans to fisherfolk for the purchase of motorized boats and improved fishing gear. The program ended with most fishers unable to payback their loans as their fish harvests and income continued to decline.

    The 1980s and 1990s were marked with significant efforts to rehabilitate destroyed mangroves and related coastal resources. In 1981, small islands indented by mangroves containing an aggregate area of 4,326 hectares were declared Wilderness Areas under Presidential Proclamation No. 2151. Also in the same year, Presidential Proclamation No. 2152 was issued declaring the entire island of Palawan and some parcels of mangroves in the country containing an aggregate area of 74,267 hectares as Mangrove Swamp Forest Reserves. In 1987, the Mangrove Forest Research Center was expanded to become nationwide in scope under the Freshwater and Coastal Ecosystems Section of the Ecosystems Research and Development Service of every regional office of the present Department of Environment and Natural Resources.

    Not long after, the Coastal Environment Program (CEP) and the Coastal Resource Management Project (CRMP) were launched in the regional offices of DENR in 1993 and in 1996, respectively. These programs promote community-based approaches to coastal resource management, making direct stakeholders partners of government in the sustainable development and management of mangroves, seagrass beds, coral reefs, and other coastal resources.
  • Meeting report

    Shrimp farming in Malaysia 

    M bin Hashim & S Kathamuthu - 2005 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center (SEAFDEC/AQD)
    Malaysia has a long coastline of 4,055 kilometers (km), of which 1,640 km is in Peninsular Malaysia and 2,415 km is in the state of Sabah and Sarawak. With the declaration of the 200 miles Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ), the total fishing area of Malaysia has expended to 160,000 square nautical miles. Given this large fishing area, fisheries are a significant sector in the Malaysian economy. The sector produced 1.5 million mt of fish valued at about RM5 B in 2003. The marine fisheries production was 1.3 million mt valued at RM4 B, constituting 1.4 % of the Gross Domestic Production (GDP). The aquaculture production was 196,874 mt valued at over RM1.2 B constituting only 13% of the total fisheries production. In the case of the marine capture fisheries, the bulk of the landings came from trawl nets (57%), purse-seine nets (21%) and traditional gerars (22%). Whereas in aquaculture, cockles (Anadara granosa) is the dominant harvest, accounting for 37% of the total aquaculture production. With regard to employment, the fishing industry involves about 89,400 fishermen and 21,100 aquaculturists giving a total of 110,500 people.

    In 2002, Malaysia exported an estimated 198,892 mt of fisheries products valued at RM1.5B. The bulk of the exports were higher for chilled fresh fish and frozen crustaceans mainly shrimps to Japan, Singapore and USA. At the same time, Malaysia imported an estimated 353,794 mt from neighboring country Thailand valued at RM1.3 B. In terms of quantity, Malaysia was a net importer of fish but in terms of value there was a net gain in foreign exchange to the tune of RM156 M.

    Traditionally, the mainstay or backbone of the Malaysian fisheries is the inshore sub-sector both in terms of production and socio-economic considerations. However, the inshore sub-sector has reached a saturation point as evidenced by declining catch rates in recent years. This is coupled with substantial fisheries resources in the EEZ waters of Malaysia and vast potentials for aquaculture development in the country. Focus of development has been shifted towards offshore fisheries and aquaculture.
  • Meeting report

    Shrimp culture in Vietnam. 

    VD Tien & V Trieu - 2005 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center (SEAFDEC/AQD)
  • Meeting report

    Overview of existing shrimp culture industry and development potential for culture of P. vannamei in Myanmar. 

    M Thame & TT Aye - 2005 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center (SEAFDEC/AQD)
    Shrimp culture in the form of traditional method commenced in Myanmar in 1970s in the western coastal areas. The culture system was trap and hold method. Natural post-larvae of Penaeus monodon were trapped into the ponds during the high tide period. There were no inputs in terms of pond preparation, eradication of predators, water fertilization, feeding, etc. However, 30 to 50 kilograms of large size of shrimps were harvested. As the ponds were usually as large as 50 to 100 hectares, the shrimp production could provide more than enough money for the shrimp farmers. Having no laws concerned with aquaculture, those shrimp ponds existed as illegal ponds. Only in 2000 that the State Level Committee, which is the Shrimp Aquaculture Development Committee was formulated and implemented a three-year project plan of the shrimp aquaculture development in Myanmar.

    According to that plan existing shrimp pond area of 26978 hectares was to increase in area of up to 48000 hectares. After the project in 2003, the shrimp pond area became 79984 hectares but it consisted of 2100 hectares of semi-intensive or intensive shrimp ponds. The production figure from shrimp culture was not properly registered.

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