Recent Submissions

  • Article

    A probiotic Bacillus strain containing amorphous poly-beta-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) stimulates the innate immune response of Penaeus monodon postlarvae 

    JLQ Laranja, EC Amar, GL Ludevese-Pascual, Y Niu, MJ Geaga, P De Schryver & P Bossier - Fish and Shellfish Immunology, 2017 - Elsevier
    In this study, the PHB-accumulating Bacillus sp. JL47 strain (capable of accumulating 55% PHB on cell dry weight) was investigated for its effects on the immune response of giant tiger shrimp (Penaeus monodon) postlarvae (PL) before and after the Vibrio campbellii challenge. Briefly, shrimp PL were cultured and fed with Artemia nauplii enriched with Bacillus sp. JL47. Shrimp receiving the Artemia nauplii without JL47 enrichment were used as control. After 15 days of feeding, the shrimp were challenged with pathogenic V. campbellii LMG 21363 at 106 cells mL-1 by immersion. Relative expression of the immune related genes encoding for prophenoloxidase (proPO), transglutaminase (TGase) and heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) in the shrimp were measured before (0 h) and after (3, 6, 9, 12, 24 h) the Vibrio challenge by quantitative real-time PCR using β-actin as the reference gene. The expressions of TGase and proPO were significantly up-regulated (p < 0.05) within 9 h and 12 h, respectively after challenge in shrimp receiving the Bacillus sp. JL47 as compared to the challenged and non-challenged controls. Hsp70 expression was significantly increased (p < 0.05) at 3 h post-challenge in all challenged shrimp. Interestingly, proPO and TGase genes were significantly up-regulated (p < 0.05) in Bacillus sp. JL47 treated shrimp even before the Vibrio challenge was applied. No up-regulation in the Hsp70 gene, however, was observed under these conditions. The data suggest that the protective effect of the PHB-accumulating Bacillus sp. JL47 in shrimp was due to its capacity to stimulate the innate immune related genes of the shrimp, specifically the proPO and TGase genes. The application of probiotic Bacillus species, capable of accumulating a significant amount of PHB, is suggested as potential immunostimulatory strategy for aquaculture.
  • Article

    Morphological deformities in mud crab Scylla serrata juveniles exposed to antibiotics during the larval stage 

    GS Pates Jr., ET Quinitio & FD Parado-Estepa - Aquaculture Research, 2017 - Wiley
    The effects of antibiotics on the external deformities, growth and survival of mud crab Scylla serrata larvae and juveniles were determined. Zoeae were exposed to oxytetracycline (OTC) (0, 3.0, 6.0, 9.0, 12 mg L-1) and furazolidone (FZD) (0, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0 mg L-1) in the first and second experiments, respectively, until the late megalopa. The crab instars were grown in nursery tanks for 1 month. Larvae survived until megalopa only at 3.0 and 6.0 mg L-1 OTC or 0.5 and 1.0 mg L-1 FZD. These four concentrations were run simultaneously in another experiment. Morphological deformities in zoea 5 were bent dorsal, rostral and furcal spines. There was no significant difference (P > 0.05) on the deformities of zoea 5 in 3.0 and 6.0 mg L-1 OTC and 0.5 and 1.0 mg L-1 FZD. Significantly (P < 0.05) higher survival and faster growth were attained in 3.0 mg L-1 OTC and 0.5 mg L-1 FZD. Deformities observed in juveniles were fused frontal and lateral spines, asymmetrical and depressed tip of abdominal flap and gap between sternites. High percentage occurrence of deformities was observed in the 6.0 mg L-1 OTC and 1.0 mg L-1 FZD in the first and third experiments, respectively. There was no significant difference (P > 0.05) observed in the survival of juveniles in OTC and FZD treatments. However, growth was significantly (P < 0.05) faster in lower concentrations of the two antibiotics. The study shows the effects of OTC and FZD in the morphology of mud crab. Therefore, there is a need to eliminate the use of antibiotics and find alternatives.
  • Article

    Temporal changes in innate immunity parameters, epinecidin gene expression, and mortality in orange-spotted grouper, Epinephelus coioides experimentally infected with a fish pathogen, Vibrio harveyi JML1 

    EC Amar, JP Faisan Jr., MJS Apines-Amar & RV Pakingking Jr. - Fish and Shellfish Immunology, 2017 - Elsevier
    Changes in innate immunity parameters and epinecidin mRNA transcript levels were examined to characterize the non-specific immune response of E. coioides to pathogenic V. harveyi JML1 isolated from affected cage-cultured fish. After fish had been injected with bacteria at a dose causing 30% mortality, blood and tissue samples were collected at 0, 6, 12, 24, 48, 72, 96, 120, and 240 h post-infection (hpi) for assessment of indices such as the oxidative burst (OB) and phagocytic index (PI) of head kidney cells, and lysozyme activity (LYS) and total immunoglobulin (Total Ig) levels of the plasma. The epinecidin mRNA transcript levels (EGE) from skin, gills, liver, kidney, and spleen tissues were also determined by gelbased RT-PCR. Lastly, daily mortality (DM), liver total bacterial load (TBC), and presumptive Vibrio count (TVC) were monitored up to 240 hpi. The results revealed that bacteria proliferated rapidly in fish tissue, reaching peak densities at 24 hpi for both TBC and TVC but was on a downward trend thereafter. The pattern in fish mortality closely correlated with TBC and TVC. Total Ig, OB, and PI in E. coioides were suppressed in the early part of infection when V. harveyi load was high but recovered and later increased as bacterial density declined. LYS and EGE were consistently high and their activities were not hampered by bacterial infection. The study demonstrated that V. harveyi JML1 interacts with E. coioides by transiently inhibiting some immune parameters resulting in mortalities. However, consistently high LYS, upregulated EGE, and resurgent PI, OB and Total Ig conferred resistance and subsequent recovery in the fish. The study provides new insights on the interaction between E. coioides and V. harveyi JML1 that can aid in formulating health management strategies for groupers. Further studies on prophylactic interventions to enhance the innate immune response in grouper during infection with V. harveyi JML1 are suggested.
  • Article

    Substrate preference for burying and feeding of sandfish Holothuria scabra juveniles 

    JP Altamirano, CP Recente & JC Rodriguez Jr. - Fisheries Research, 2017 - Elsevier
    Substrate preference for both burying and feeding of sandfish Holothuria scabra juveniles (3–6 g wet body weight) and their associated daily behavior, growth and survival were investigated in laboratory and field experiments using different coastal substrate types (silty mud, sandy mud, and coarse sand) to determine the ideal habitat for potential grow-out culture, sea ranching or stock enhancement of this important sea cucumber species. During the peak hours of burying (03:00–09:00 h) and feeding (15:00–03:00 h), a significantly greater number of sandfish juveniles preferred to bury in (28.3%) and feed on (21.5%) sandy mud, typical of intertidal coastal sand flats. Silty mud was the least preferred substrate for feeding (13.5%) and burying (13.8%). Burying and feeding preferences of sandfish juveniles were not significantly influenced by the presence of seagrass (Thalassia hemprichii) on coarse sand. Growth of sandfish juveniles in the first two weeks of rearing in tanks was significantly greater on coarse sand (growth rate: 0.59 g d−1 or 7.0% d−1), followed by sandy mud (0.34 g d−1 or 4.72% d−1) while OM content of these sediments remain almost unchanged. On silty mud, sandfish juveniles constantly shrunk (−0.02 g d−1 or −0.63% d−1) for 8 weeks while sediment OM content increased. In the field, silty mud substrate of a mangrove pond caused total mortality of sandfish within two weeks, while sandy mud substrate of a sand flat provided significantly higher growth than the control (no sediment), but not significantly different than coarse sand of a seagrass bed. Sandy mud to coarse sand substrates of intertidal sand flats were most preferred by sandfish juveniles while silty mud associated with muddy mangroves and culture ponds seems to be unsuitable that sandfish would opt to avoid. Our results will contribute to the selection of suitable sites for sandfish sea ranching and stock enhancement in coastal areas.
  • Article

    Nutritional evaluation of distiller's dried grain with soluble as replacement to soybean meal in diets of milkfish, Chanos chanos and its effect on fish performance and intestinal morphology 

    REP Mamauag, JA Ragaza & TJ Nacionales - Aquaculture Nutrition, 2017 - Wiley
    A 90-day feeding trial was conducted on milkfish, Chanos chanos with an initial mean body weight of 3.07 ± 0.17 g (mean ± standard error of mean). Six treatment diets were formulated to contain 0 g/kg (Diet 1), 150 g/kg (Diet 2), 25 g/kg (Diet 3), 300 g/kg (Diet 4), 350 g/kg (Diet 5) and 450 g/kg (Diet 6) distiller's dried grain with soluble (DDGS). All the dietary treatments were isonitrogenous (350 g/kg crude protein) and isolipidic (6% crude lipid). Result of the feeding trial indicated that growth rates, feed intake and feed efficiency were not significantly (p > .05) affected by inclusion levels of DDGS by up to 450 g/kg in the feed. Proximate body composition (crude protein, crude lipid, ash, fibre) in fish fed the dietary treatments were not significantly (p > .05) affected as well. The DDGS when used as a milkfish ingredient has a protein digestibility of 910 g/kg, fat disgetsibility of 850 g/kg, carbohydrate digestibility of 750 g/kg and a dry matter digestibility of 520 g/kg Results from the intestinal morphology displayed no apparent pathological changes in the digestive tract of fish fed all dietary treatments. These results indicate that DDGS can be efficiently utilized by milkfish by up to 450 g/kg without negatively affecting performance parameters and intestinal morphology.
  • Article

    Growth and feed performance, digestibility and acute stress response of juvenile grouper (Epinephelus fuscoguttatus) fed diets with hydrolysate from milkfish offal 

    REP Mamauag & JA Ragaza - Aquaculture Research, 2017 - Wiley
    Nutritional qualities of fish processing by-products can further be improved through enzymatic hydrolysis. The objective of this study was to elucidate the efficacy of hydrolysed milkfish offal at different inclusion levels when fed to juvenile grouper, Epinephelus fuscoguttatus, with an initial body weight of 2.88 ± 0.06 g. The animals were fed for 56 days with seven diets supplemented with 0 (control), 5%, 15% and 25% of milkfish offal (MO) and milkfish offal hydrolysate (MOH). The diets were formulated to be isonitrogenous (45%) and isolipidic (11%). The diets were assigned to 21 tanks (15 fish per tank) with each diet having three replicates. Results from the experimental trials indicated that feed conversion efficiency, feed intake and weight gain of fish significantly (P < 0.05) improved when fed diets with MOH. No significant differences within the rest of the dietary treatments were observed. Survival rate (>90%) did not differ in all the dietary treatments. Proximate composition (crude protein, crude fat and ash) indicated no significant difference among fish fed from all the dietary treatments. Apparent digestibility of MOH indicated a 95% and 66% digestibility for protein and dry matter respectively. Plasma stress parameters (cortisol and glucose) were not influenced by the dietary treatment when fish were subjected to an acute stressor (5-min chasing). Liver morphology indicated normal hepatocyte shape and the presence of lipid droplets in fish fed from all the dietary treatments. The results indicated that milkfish offal processed as hydrolysate can be utilized in grouper diets and can promote growth and feed efficiency when supplied at 10–15%.
  • Article

    Optimum low salinity to reduce cannibalism and improve survival of the larvae of freshwater African catfish Clarias gariepinus 

    G Kawamura, T Bagarinao, ASK Yong, PW Sao, LS Lim & S Senoo - Fisheries Science, 2017 - Springer Verlag
    The freshwater African catfish Clarias gariepinus is carnivorous and cannibalistic even during the larval and juvenile stages and this behavior causes economic losses in aquaculture. This study examined for the first time the effect of salinity on cannibalism, survival, and growth of African catfish larvae in the hatchery. Larvae (4 days old, median 7.8 mm TL, 2.8 mg BW) of the African catfish were reared for 21 days at nominal salinity 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, and 7 ppt. After 21 days, they grew to 10–39 mm (median 22 mm) and 10–490 mg (median 90 mg), with no significant difference by salinity treatments. Survival ratios were similarly low (24–31%) at 0, 1, 3, and 7 ppt and significantly higher (49–55%) at 2, 4, 5, and 6 ppt. Cannibalism was significantly lower, 15–30% at 4–6 ppt, than the 40–50% at 0–3 and 7 ppt. Size variation was lower at 4–6 ppt and higher at 0–3 and 7 ppt. We recommend hatchery rearing of African catfish at the optimum low salinity of 4–6 ppt rather than in full fresh water at least up to 21 days. This rearing method fosters larval welfare and improves hatchery production.
  • Article

    Colour discrimination in dim light by the larvae of the African catfish Clarias gariepinus 

    G Kawamura, T Bagarinao, PK Hoo, J Justin & LS Lim - Ichthyological Research, 2017 - Springer
    Many demersal fish species undergo vertical shifts in habitats during ontogeny especially after larval metamorphosis. The visual spectral sensitivity shifts with the habitat, indicating a change in colour vision. Colour vision depends on sufficient ambient light and becomes ineffective at a particular low light intensity. It is not known how fishes see colour in dim light. By means of a behavioural experiment on larval African catfish Clarias gariepinus in the laboratory, we determined colour vision and colour discrimination in dim light. Light-adapted larvae were subjected to classical conditioning to associate a reward feed with a green or a red stimulus placed among 7 shades of grey. The larvae learned this visual task after 70 and 90 trials. A different batch of larvae were trained to discriminate between green and red and then tested for the ability to discriminate between these colours, as the light intensity was reduced. The larvae learned this visual task after 110 trials in bright light and were able to discriminate colours, as light was dimmed until 0.01 lx, the minimal illuminance measurable in this study, and similar to starlight. The retinae of the larvae were found to be light adapted at 0.01 lx; thus indicating cone-based colour vision at this illuminance. For comparison, three human subjects were tested under similar conditions and showed a colour vision threshold at between 1.5 and 0.1 lx. For the larvae of C. gariepinus, the ability of colour discrimination in dim light is probably due to its retinal tapetum, which could increase the sensitivity of cones.
  • Article

    Quality assessment of newly hatched mud crab, Scylla serrata, larvae 

    ET Quinitio, JJ dela Cruz-Huervana & FD Parado-Estepa - Aquaculture Research, 2017 - Wiley
    Starvation and exposure to formalin were investigated as possible stress tests for evaluating the quality of mud crab, Scylla serrata, larvae. For the starvation stress test, newly hatched zoeae stocked in 150-ml containers were either starved or fed rotifers. Similarly, newly hatched zoeae were stocked in containers with seawater of 0 (control), 20, 30 and 40 mg/L formalin for the formalin stress test. The zoeae from the same batches were used for seed production to monitor their performance and validate the results of stress tests. Starvation was found to be unsuitable for larval quality evaluation. However, the impact of initial food deprivation on the newly hatched larvae indicates that feeding immediately after hatching is necessary for mud crab larvae. Exposure of larvae to 40 mg/L formalin for 3 hr appeared to be a reliable and practical method for larval quality assessment as the survival of larvae in the mass production tanks validated the classification of good and poor quality batches in the stress tests. On this basis, a hatchery operator can decide which batch should be cultured further. Finally, there appears to be a link between the quality of larvae and the performance at the megalopa and early juvenile crabs.
  • Article

    Abdominal segment deformity syndrome (asds) and fused body segment deformity (fbsd) in cultured Penaeus indicus 

    The abdominal segment deformity disease (ASDD) is a new shrimp disease reported only in cultured Penaeus vannamei in Thailand. Shrimp with ASDD have deformed abdominal segment, jagged gut line and bumpy surfaces. Similar signs were observed in cultured P. indicus in the Philippines. However, aside from the signs described for ASDD, some P. indicus showing abdominal segment deformity syndrome (ASDS) had more severe deformities up to the extent that the number of body segments was reduced due to fusion. Shrimp with fused body segment deformity (FBSD) had four instead of five pairs of legs. To account the prevalence of the deformities in P. indicus, shrimp were classified into grossly normal shrimp (NS), shrimp with abdominal segment deformity syndrome (ASDS) and shrimp with fused segments (FBSD). Out of the shrimp sampled, 83.4 ± 5.4% was NS, 10.9 ± 6.2% was ASDS and 5.7 ± 3.0% was FBSD. Morphometric characteristics of the shrimp were measured. There was no significant difference in body weight (BW) among male and female NS, ASDS and FBSD. In both sexes, total length (TL) of FBSD was significantly shorter compared to NS and ASDS. Shrimp samples were also screened to be negative for known infectious viral diseases including white spot syndrome virus (WSSV), infectious hypodermal and haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHHNV), infectious myonecrosis virus (IMNV), P. vannamei nodavirus (PvNV), Macrobrachium rosenbergii nodavirus (MrNV) and Taura syndrome virus (TSV). Occurrence of ASDS and FBSD in post-larvae (PL) produced from captive and wild spawners were also determined. Based on a tank experiment, no significant difference was detected between the percentages of ASDS in PL produced from wild or captive spawners but FBSD was only noted in PL produced from the latter. Deformities generally did not affect the size of P. indicus except for the reduced length of shrimp with FBSD which when coupled with missing pleopods could lead to major economic loss for shrimp farmers if not addressed properly.
  • Article

    Use of agar-bound microparticulate diet as alternative food for tropical abalone, Haliotis asinina (Linnaeus 1758) post-larvae in large-scale cultures 

    MN Bautista-Teruel, JRH Maquirang, MR de la Peña & VT Balinas - Aquaculture International, 2017 - Springer Verlag
    The efficacy of using agar-bound microparticulate diet (A-MPD) as alternative food for abalone Haliotis asinina Linne post-larvae in large-scale culture was investigated. Larvae sourced from the hatchery-bred (HB) and wild-sourced (WS) broodstock were fed with either diatoms (TMT1-NF), agar-bound microparticulate diet (TMT2-A-MPD), or a combination of both feeds (TMT3-NF + A-MPD) in six 2-m3 tanks replicated over time. Three hundred thousand veliger larvae were stocked/tank containing 80 corrugated plates with mucus trails hanging on bamboo poles. Feeds were given at 0900 h starting at day 3 with seawater flow through introduced every 1400 h starting day 5. Two-way analysis of variance determined significant differences (p < 0.05) in survival and shell length between larval sources and feed types. Tukey’s post hoc test established differences among treatment means. At day 30, survival for HB- and WS-sourced larvae was significantly higher (42%) in TMT3 compared with TMT2 having 35% for HB and 38% for WS (p < 0.05). Larvae fed with TMT1 had significantly lowest survival among the three treatments. Survival at 60 and 90 days did not show significant difference for TMT2 and TMT3 regardless of broodstock source. Post-larval shell growth (90 days), from both sources fed with TMT2 and TMT3, was significantly higher than TMT1 (p < 0.05). Larval performance did not show any significant interactions between HB and WS broodstock. The use of A-MPD alone or in combination may elicit improvement in survival and shell length growth in abalone larvae regardless of larval sources. A-MPD may be used as full or partial replacements to diatoms as alternative food for abalone post-larvae in large-scale culture.
  • Conference paper

    Mud crab fattening project of KAMAMANA in Del Carmen, Siargao Island 

    AE Sulima - In ET Quinitio, FD Parado-Estepa & RM Coloso (Eds.), Philippines : In the forefront of the mud crab industry development : proceedings of the 1st National Mud Crab Congress, 16-18 November 2015, Iloilo City, Philippines, 2017 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
    The Kaanib ng mga Mangingisda at Magsasaka ng Numancia Aqua-Agrikultura (KAMAMANA), established in Del Carmen, Siargao Island in 2011 is a People's Organization active in promoting the advocacy in 1) protecting the environment and natural resources, 2) providing services for the family welfare, and 3) managing sustainable livelihood programs and community development. One of the major livelihood programs presently being implemented by KAMAMANA is the fattening of mud crab (mangrove crab), Scylla serrata, in plastic containers set up in a mangrove area. Tenurial rights to manage a 2-hectare mangrove area for 25 years was granted to KAMAMANA by the Department of Environmental and Natural Resources.

    Crabs obtained from the mangrove areas of Del Carmen and nearby municipalities are purchased and stocked in plastic containers. The crabs are fed trash fish and mollusks once every afternoon to satiation until they are fattened, usually for 1-2 weeks. The major problem encountered is mortality after molting. Four KAMAMANA members are involved in the crab fattening. When mortalities occur, the dead crabs are usually charged to members assigned in the operation. The fattened crabs are sold to local restaurants, hotels, resorts and walk-in buyers or brought to traders in Surigao City. The net income is divided into the following: members involved in the culture (50%), treasurer (10%), business manager (15%), organizational share (5%), savings (5%) and trust fund (15%).
  • Conference paper

    Biological evaluation of existing feed formulations for the grow-out culture of the mud crab, Scylla serrata 

    MR Catacutan - In ET Quinitio, FD Parado-Estepa & RM Coloso (Eds.), Philippines : In the forefront of the mud crab industry development : proceedings of the 1st National Mud Crab Congress, 16-18 November 2015, Iloilo City, Philippines, 2017 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
    This study was conducted to identify a formulated pelleted feed for the grow-out culture of the mud crab. A commercial crab feed (CCF) was evaluated together with fish by-catch (FBC) and three test diets (formulated and pelleted) of similar dietary energy (1723 MJ/Kg diet) based on published works. The test diets contained 48% (D-1), 43% (D-2), and 38% (D-3) crude protein (CP), respectively. All the five dietary treatments were fed to crablets (5 to 6 g body weight) that were individually stocked in 60-L tanks. Each dietary treatment was fed to six crabs. Crustaceans grow by molting which is not simultaneous, hence, each crab was monitored daily. After the third molt (M3) survival rates in D-1, D-2 and D-3 ranged from 33%-66% compared with only 16% in FBC, and 0% in CCF where no crab survived to molt for the second time (M2). Nutrients in FBC may not be sufficient to sustain growth and survival, while water stable CCF may lack a feed attractant. Diets D-1, D-2, and D-3 were evaluated in another feeding experiment to identify the basal diet for the crab. All crabs molted until M3 and no significant differences were noted on growth performance between treatments. However, D-1 (48% CP) was identified as the basal diet due to better numerical values observed in terms of feed conversion ratios and specific growth rates.
  • Conference paper

    Trading of juvenile crabs and grow-out culture in Capiz 

    GJ Panaguiton - In ET Quinitio, FD Parado-Estepa & RM Coloso (Eds.), Philippines : In the forefront of the mud crab industry development : proceedings of the 1st National Mud Crab Congress, 16-18 November 2015, Iloilo City, Philippines, 2017 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
    The article presents the trade of juvenile crabs in the Province of Capiz, Philippines. Moreover grow-out culture was also presented. Likewise, common problems encountered in the trade, and culture of the crabs was discussed.
  • Conference paper

    Overview of the mud crab industry in the Philippines 

    ET Quinitio - In ET Quinitio, FD Parado-Estepa & RM Coloso (Eds.), Philippines : In the forefront of the mud crab industry development : proceedings of the 1st National Mud Crab Congress, 16-18 November 2015, Iloilo City, Philippines, 2017 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
    Mud crab farming has long been established in the Philippines and the country is the second top producer in the world. Except for Scylla paramamosain, the three other species, S. serrata, S. tranquebarica and S. olivacea are commonly found in the country, but S. serrata is the preferred species for farming. Crab seeds for farming are mainly from the wild and in recent years, a small percentage from the hatchery. Due to the apparent decline of the wild crab stocks, provincial and municipal ordinances have been issued by a number of Local Government Units (LGUs) along with the Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources (BFAR) to conserve and manage the remaining resources. From the hatchery, megalopa or crab instars are grown in net cages installed in the nursery pond. Mud crab farming engages mostly in long-term grow-out culture of juvenile crabs to market size for 3-5 months, short-term fattening of lean crabs for 15-45 days, and recently, soft-shell crab production. Polyculture of juvenile crabs to market size with one to three other commodities in earthen brackishwater ponds is usually practiced. Mud crabs for soft-shell crab production are mainly from the wild, while SEAFDEC/AQD demonstrates the use of hatchery-produced juvenile mud crabs as seedstock.

    Refinement is continuously being done to improve the economic viability of producing crabs, although basic technologies have been developed for all phases of culture (hatchery, nursery, grow-out, fattening and soft shell crab production). The major issues facing the industry are the lack of seedstock, difficulty of zoea 5 to molt to megalopa stage, cannibalism particularly at the nursery phase, species identification at the juvenile stage, use of fish as aquafeed, diseases, effects of climate change and quality of crabs at postharvest. In 2012, the Philippine Council for Agriculture, Aquatic and Natural Resources Research and Development (PCAARRD) of the Department of Science and Technology (DOST) started funding projects under the National Mud Crab Science and Technology Program (NMCSTP) to address these issues. The major aim of the Program was to improve the production, profitability and sustainability of crab farming. SEAFDEC/AQD leads in capacity building with focus on the sustainability of the mud crab industry. Various collaborations and research studies on mud crab culture enabled SEAFDEC/AQD to package mud crab technologies, conduct local and international training courses and on-site technology demonstrations, and publish extension manuals and scientific publications since the mid1990s. Research and Development activities have been translated into improved production. With the recent developments and refinements of technologies, it is expected that the Philippines will increase its production by 25-50% in the next 5 years.
  • Conference paper

    Philippine National Standard for Live Mud Crabs: establishing food safety and quality requirements 

    MF Matubang, TS Palomares, JP Peralta, ET Quinitio, RJ Ragaza, JV Alejo, PB Regazpi, CE Romero, HA Montoya, JG Trinidad & KKA Roscom - In ET Quinitio, FD Parado-Estepa & RM Coloso (Eds.), Philippines : In the forefront of the mud crab industry development : proceedings of the 1st National Mud Crab Congress, 16-18 November 2015, Iloilo City, Philippines, 2017 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
    The Bureau of Agriculture and Fisheries Standards (BAFS) of the Department of Agriculture (DA), in collaboration with the relevant government and research agencies, academe and industry organization, is currently developing the Philippine National Standard (PNS) for live mangrove crabs (also known as mud crabs). This PNS defines the food safety and quality requirements for live mangrove crabs in order to ensure consumers&rsquo; health and make the product globally competitive. The process in the development of standards include review of the existing requirements of local and foreign markets and internationally recognized standards, creation of the Technical Working Group, initial drafting of the PNS, conduct of public consultations in major production areas, finalization of the draft for the PNS, notification to the World Trade Organization and approval of the DA Secretary.

    The PNS for live mangrove crabs specifies the scope of the standard, product description, essential composition and quality factors, hygiene, handling, labeling requirements, methods of sampling, examination and analysis, definition of defectives, and the requirements for product lot acceptance.
  • Conference paper

    Unified provincial fisheries law enforcement of ordinance of Camarines Norte focusing on mud crab 

    EA Estanislao - In ET Quinitio, FD Parado-Estepa & RM Coloso (Eds.), Philippines : In the forefront of the mud crab industry development : proceedings of the 1st National Mud Crab Congress, 16-18 November 2015, Iloilo City, Philippines, 2017 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
    Due to overfishing and widespread coastal habitat degradation, the Province of Camarines Norte passed a provincial fisheries law enforcement known as the Unified Provincial Fisheries Law Enforcement Ordinance of Camarines Norte (UPFLEON) (P.O. 50-10). Given emphasis in the paper is the banning in the collection and possession of less than 1.0 cm juvenile crabs.
  • Conference paper

    Recent developments and enhancing transfer of the nursery technology for the mud crab Scylla serrata 

    FD Parado-Estepa, V Alava, E Garibay, C Bejemino, J Sumile, J Silvestre & ET Quinitio - In ET Quinitio, FD Parado-Estepa & RM Coloso (Eds.), Philippines : In the forefront of the mud crab industry development : proceedings of the 1st National Mud Crab Congress, 16-18 November 2015, Iloilo City, Philippines, 2017 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
    The development of hatchery techniques for seed production of mud crab is expected to address the present problem on the depletion of wild seedstock supply for stocking in grow-out ponds. The nursery serves as the link between the two phases of culture as this involves growing of juvenile crabs produced in the hatchery to sizes that are suitable for stocking in the ponds.

    Nursery rearing involves the use of net cages installed in ponds as holding system for ease in harvest and retrieval of crabs. In the first nursery phase, 0.3-0.5 cm carapace width (CW) juvenile crabs are reared to 1.5-2.0 cm CW for 3-4 weeks and stocks are harvested for selling or are grown further in a second nursery phase in which crabs reach 2.5-3.0 cm after another 3-4 weeks. This paper includes a review of techniques initially developed for the nursery and more recent refinements which involve the use of higher crab instar densities, provision of suitable shelters, trimming of claws and sorting. In addition, production results in farms of collaborators are presented to highlight the efficiency of dissemination and also discusses the challenges faced by the potential nursery industry.
  • Conference paper

    Updates on the larviculture of mud crab at SEAFDEC/AQD 

    ET Quinitio, JJDC Huervana, JC Virgula & FD Parado-Estepa - In ET Quinitio, FD Parado-Estepa & RM Coloso (Eds.), Philippines : In the forefront of the mud crab industry development : proceedings of the 1st National Mud Crab Congress, 16-18 November 2015, Iloilo City, Philippines, 2017 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
    Although the mud crab (Scylla serrata) hatchery technology has been developed, issues such as high cost of production due to the need for additional facilities and labor for natural food culture, inconsistent survival rate at megalopa stage due to Molt Death Syndrome (MDS), and disease due to luminescent bacteria (Vibrio spp.), remain to be addressed. Refinements on the existing mud crab larviculture technology were done to address these problems.

    Poor nutrition, low water temperature and application of prophylaxis during the zoea l stage have been identified as possible causes of MDS. Six shrimp formulated diets (FD) were tested, and 3 of these proved to be suitable for mud crab larvicuture. Larval performance was compared using the 3 diets + natural food (NF, rotifers and Artemia) and NF alone as control. No significant difference was noted in the survival among the 4 treatments, although BP Nippai fed larvae had higher values. Lesser occurrence of MDS was observed in all the larvae fed FD+NF. Three mud crab larval diets with various attractants (squid, annelids, and squid + annelids) were also formulated and fed to the larvae. Results showed no significant difference among the 3 diets. The results of another experiment investigating the effects of the reduction of natural food showed that larvae fed 50% NF + 50% FD and 75%NF + 25% FD had higher survival compared to those fed 75% AD +25% NF and no NF at all. The results indicate that the larvae cannot survive with formulated diet alone. It has been observed that frequency of antibiotic application can be reduced to every 5 days if good quality mud crab larvae are used. Formalin stress test proved to be a reliable method to determine the quality of a batch of newly hatched zoeae. All prophylactic treatments are stopped when megalopae reach the benthic stage.

    To accelerate the dissemination of science-based mud crab hatchery technology to industry stakeholders, SEAFDEC/AQD entered into an agreement with private hatchery operators, State Universities and Colleges, and Local Government Units on giving assistance during initial hatchery operations. Technicians were given free training, followed by in-situ hatchery operations with assistance from SEAFDEC/AQD with the funding from PCAARRD-DOST. Crablets are now being produced by the collaborators. Increase in the production of hatchery-reared crablets will eventually reduce the dependence on wild-sourced mud crab seed stock for farming.
  • Conference paper

    Capacity building initiatives of Winrock International on mud crab culture in the Caraga Region 

    J Nobillos, D Gudahl & J Orprecio - In ET Quinitio, FD Parado-Estepa & RM Coloso (Eds.), Philippines : In the forefront of the mud crab industry development : proceedings of the 1st National Mud Crab Congress, 16-18 November 2015, Iloilo City, Philippines, 2017 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
    The paper presents the output of the capacity building initiatives of Winrock International on Mud crab culture in the Caraga Region, Philippines. The capacity building seminar included lectures on the mud crab biology, pond preparation, nursery and grow-out culture, fattening, and soft-shell crab farming. Identification of the various crab body parts, actual pond preparation, nursery and grow-out culture of crab were demonstrated after the series of lectures.

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