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dc.contributor.authorVogt, Günter
dc.contributor.authorQuinitio, Emilia T.
dc.date.accessioned2013-02-21T09:00:09Z
dc.date.available2013-02-21T09:00:09Z
dc.date.issued1994
dc.identifier.citationVogt, G., & Quinitio, E. T. (1994). Accumulation and excretion of metal granules in the prawn, Penaeus monodon, exposed to water-borne copper, lead, iron and calcium. Aquatic Toxicology, 28(3–4), 223–241.en
dc.identifier.issn0166-445X
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10862/1466
dc.description.abstractJuveniles of the giant tiger prawn, Penaeus monodon, were exposed for 10 days to 1 mg/l copper, lead, iron or calcium in order to investigate the formation and accumulation of metal granules in major soft tissues as well as their excretion from the body. Metal deposition was investigated by histochemistry and electron microscopy in the hepatopancreas and surrounding organs and tissues like the stomach, midgut, anterior midgut caecum, thoracal antennal gland extensions, haematopoietic tissue, and interspersed musculature, connective tissue and pigment tissue. The abundance of metal granules varied greatly between the metals and the tissues. Iron and calcium deposits were found in none of the tissues investigated. Copper granules were accumulated in high quantity in the hepatopancreas tubules, were scarce in the antechamber of the hepatopancreas, the anterior midgut and the anterior midgut caecum, and were lacking in the other tissues. The amount and size of copper granules increased along the hepatopancreas tubules in accordance with the cells' age. The granules were released by discharge of senescent hepatopancreas cells in the antechamber region and were added to the faeces. Lead granules were primarily found in the thoracal extensions of the antennal gland. In the hepatopancreas they occurred only in very small quantities, and in the other organs and tissues they were absent. In the antennal gland, the lead granules were individually discharged into the gland lumen by apocrine secretion and excreted with the urine. The observed ability of Penaeus monodon to detoxify and remove metals like copper and lead by granule formation and excretion and to prevent other metals like iron from entrance into major soft tissues corroborate that decapods are no suitable organisms for a long-term biomonitoring of heavy metal pollution.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevieren
dc.subjectPrawns and shrimpsen
dc.subjectPenaeus monodon
dc.titleAccumulation and excretion of metal granules in the prawn, Penaeus monodon, exposed to water-borne copper, lead, iron and calciumen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/0166-445X(94)90035-3
dc.citation.volume28
dc.citation.issue3-4
dc.citation.spage223
dc.citation.epage241
dc.citation.journalTitleAquatic Toxicologyen
seafdecaqd.library.callnumberVF SJ 0477
seafdecaqd.databank.controlnumber1994-19
dc.subject.asfaBioaccumulationen
dc.subject.asfaCalciumen
dc.subject.asfaCopperen
dc.subject.asfaExcretionen
dc.subject.asfaHeavy metalsen
dc.subject.asfaHistochemistryen
dc.subject.asfaIronen
dc.subject.asfaLeaden
dc.subject.asfaMetalsen
dc.subject.asfaPollution monitoringen
dc.subject.asfaWater pollutionen
dc.subject.asfaIndicator speciesen
dc.subject.asfaPollution effectsen


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