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dc.contributor.authorApud, Florentino D.
dc.contributor.editorTaki, Yasuhiko
dc.contributor.editorPrimavera, Jurgenne H.
dc.contributor.editorLlobrera, Jose A.
dc.date.accessioned2011-06-22T09:34:57Z
dc.date.available2011-06-22T09:34:57Z
dc.date.issued1985
dc.identifier.citationApud, F. D. (1985). Extensive and semi-intensive culture of prawn and shrimp in the Philippines. In Taki, Y., Primavera, J. H., Llobrera, J. A. (Eds.), Proceedings of the First International Conference on the Culture of Penaeid Prawns/Shrimps, 4-7 December 1984 (pp. 105-113). Iloilo City, Philippines: Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center, Aquaculture Department.en
dc.identifier.isbn9718511008
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10862/249
dc.description.abstractVarious farming systems for prawn and shrimp are compared, with emphasis on the extensive and semi-intensive culture of tiger prawn Penaeus monodon and white shrimp Penaeus indicus in monoculture or in polyculture with milkfish (Chanos chanos). The bases of comparison include pond design characteristics, stocking density, food supply, water management, average production, technical, and other major input requirements. Common factors that may influence production for each system are also discussed. It is observed that prawn and shrimp production has been mainly characterized by the extensive system. Of the 200,000 ha of brackishwater fishponds in the Philippines, about 25% (50,000 ha) are stocked with prawns and shrimps in monoculture or in polyculture with milkfish. Only a relatively small portion (less than 500 ha) of the area is utilized for semi-intensive culture. The dramatic increase in area utilization for extensive prawn production in recent years can be attributed to high market demand, increased hatchery-bred fry production, minimum technical requirements, and lower production cost and risks. The trend towards intensification among existing large fishfarms is hampered by rising capital costs for fishpond improvement and increasing operational expense and risks. However, intensification is gaining some attention and progress in limited areas, primarily to maximize utilization and production to avoid high investment cost of land for expansion. Further development and progress in the industry will be dependent on such factors as market price, availability of fry and feed at reasonable cost, supply of trained technicians, technical problems, financial situation, and economic viability of the operation.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherAquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Centeren
dc.subjectCrustaceaen
dc.subjectShrimp cultureen
dc.subjectExtensive cultureen
dc.subjectSemi-intensive cultureen
dc.subjectPhilippinesen
dc.subjectGiant tiger shrimpen
dc.subjectShrimpsen
dc.subjectPenaeus monodonen
dc.subjectAquaculture systemsen
dc.subjectPenaeus indicusen
dc.subject.lccVF SP 031
dc.titleExtensive and semi-intensive culture of prawn and shrimp in the Philippinesen
dc.typeConference paperen
dc.citation.spage105
dc.citation.epage113
dc.citation.conferenceTitleProceedings of the First International Conference on the Culture of Penaeid Prawns/Shrimps, 4-7 December 1984, Iloilo City, Philippinesen


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