Report of the round table discussion on the development of genetically improved strain of Macrobrachium, Freshwater Aquaculture Development Center, Sukabumi, West Java, Indonesia 16-19 November 2003.

The Round Table Discussion on the Development of Genetically Improved Strain of Macrobrachuim is part of the Collaborative Research on Genetic Improvement and Seed Production of Macrobrachuim rosenbergii under the ASEAN-SEAFDEC Special Five-Year Program on Sustainable Fisheries for Food Security in the ASEAN Region: Aquaculture Component. The participating countries in the Collaborative Research are Indonesia, Philippines and Thailand.

This publication documents the outcome of the Round Table Discussion including the proposals submitted by the participating countries for implementation under the Collaborative Research.

Recent Submissions

  • Meeting report

    Research project proposals 

    Anon. - 2004 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center (SEAFDEC/AQD)
  • Meeting report

    Preliminary pages 

    Anon. - 2004 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center (SEAFDEC/AQD)
  • Meeting report

    Report of the round table discussion 

    Anon. - 2004 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center (SEAFDEC/AQD)
  • Meeting report

    Participants in the Round Table Discussion 

    Anon. - 2004 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center (SEAFDEC/AQD)
  • Meeting report

    Giant freshwater prawn culture in Indonesia. 

    E Nugroho & L Emmawati - 2004 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center (SEAFDEC/AQD)
    Indonesia is one of the countries that have high levels of biological diversity in terms of freshwater fishes, the country’s rich biological resources, characterized by a high level of endemism. About 30 endemic species of freshwater fishes are found in Sumatera, 149 species in Kalimantan, 12 species in Java, and 52 species in Sulawesi (Anonym, 1994; Kottelat et al.,1993). The country’s total freshwater area is 55 million ha consisting of lakes, dams, swamps and other water bodies. The potential area for freshwater pond fish culture is estimated at 233,124 ha with a production of 334,085 mt/year (DGF, Indonesia. 2001), of which about 5140 mt comprises the giant freshwater prawn.
  • Meeting report

    Culture of giant freshwater prawn: Philippines. 

    WR Rosario & MM Tayamen - 2004 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center (SEAFDEC/AQD)
    Freshwater prawn thrives in inland bodies of water like rivers, lakes, swamps, irrigation canals, estuaries and even in rivers upstream. More than 100 species were reported to exist worldwide. A recent survey in Luzon Island, Philippines identified 12 species of freshwater prawn found in the island.

    The country’s interest on freshwater prawn fishery started in 1914 as explained by Cowles (1914), when he identified that freshwater prawn was one of the important fisheries during that time. Likewise, he discussed the geographical distribution of the species, the value of fishery and biology.

    In late 1976, trials were conducted to culture the freshwater prawn, however, the studies were never sustained. For these trials, the collection of wild spawners and larval rearing of M. rosenbergii was conducted in Misamis Oriental, Mindanao between 1976-1979 by Dejarme et al. Post larval stage was attained but larval rearing lasted only for 39 days. There were more attempts in the past to adopt the technology for the propagation of the species but the efforts never progressed beyond research at institution level.

    In 1981, a local banker-industrialist established a 100-hectare commercial Macrobrachium farm in Sta. Rosa, Nueva Ecija and a hatchery in Bulacan. Services of experts from Israel were utilized for the project. Marketable prawns were sold live in Metro Manila utilizing in-house retail outlets. After a few years, the company diversified their operations to include tilapia culture. However, even the diversification failed to save the first commercial production venture of Macrobrachium rosenbergii in the Philippines.
  • Meeting report

    The macrobrachium culture industry in Thailand. 

    S Uraiwa & P Sodsuk - 2004 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center (SEAFDEC/AQD)
    Giant freshwater prawn (Macrobrachum rosenbergii) is one of the most important economic species in Thailand as well as in many Southeast Asian countries. It is highly demanded as food for the Thais that lead to its gradual over-catching from the natural waters every year. Thus, domestication experiments on the Macrobrachium have been conducted by the Department of Fisheries since 1956 to increase prawn production (Sidthimunka and Bhukaswan, 1982). This resulted in the nationwide extension of its culture technology to a number of commercial giant freshwater prawn culture companies. Now this species has become one of the economic commodities in the country’s aquaculture industry. Recently, statistics report showed that the total prawn culture in 2002 increased by 38% from the year 1996, while the total value in the same year increased by 89% from the year 1996. The statistics also showed that in 1996 and 2002, the total production were 7200 and 10,000 mt, respectively, valued at 596.3 and 1,117.6 million Thai Baht, respectively (Department of Fisheries and Suwannatos, 2003). The market price per kg of freshwater prawn, which varies according to the prawn sizes, has been increasing since 1989. In 1997, the large, medium and small sizes increased by 76%, 123% and 81% from those in year 1989, respectively.