Recent Submissions

  • Meeting report

    List of participants. 

    Anon. - 2006 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center (SEAFDEC/AQD)
  • Meeting report

    Recommendations, resolution, future plan of action, field trip. 

    Anon. - 2006 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center (SEAFDEC/AQD)
  • Meeting report

    Introduction. 

    Anon. - 2006 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center (SEAFDEC/AQD)
  • Meeting report

    The third round table discussion. 

    Anon. - 2006 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center (SEAFDEC/AQD)
  • Meeting report

    Proposed plan of activities for 2006-2010. 

    Anon. - 2006 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center (SEAFDEC/AQD)
  • Meeting report

    Progress of activities under the collaborative project: Summary. 

    Anon. - 2006 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center (SEAFDEC/AQD)
  • Meeting report

    Evaluation of growth rate of GI Macro II strain in different locations. 

    E Nugroho, I Khasani & Mr. Maskur - 2006 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center (SEAFDEC/AQD)
  • Meeting report

    Project on genetic characterization, domestication, genetic improvement and culture of Macrobrachium rosenbergii in the Philippines. 

    Anon. - 2005 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center (SEAFDEC/AQD)
  • Meeting report

    Selective breeding program for genetic improvement of Macrobrachium rosenbergii in Thailand. 

    SU Uraiwan & PK Sodsuk - 2005 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center (SEAFDEC/AQD)
    Although the giant freshwater prawn (Macrobrachium rosenbergii) has been domesticated in Thailand for over decades, appropriate selective breeding program has yet to be achieved. Good quality seeds for the Machrobrachium aquaculture industry is therefore not regularly produced. One of the selective breeding programs on improving growth performance of the domesticated strain have been carried out at the Aquatic Animal Genetics Research and Development Institute (AAGRDI), Department of Fisheries of Thailand. AAGRDI has now developed improved and domesticated stock of Macrobrachium rosenbergii for two generations. Meanwhile, domesticated stocks from private hatcheries have also been acquired.

    There is, therefore, the need to develop another improved stock of this species basically from these two domesticated stocks together with a wild stock in order to improve the genetic diversity of the base population for further selective breeding program. Macrobrachium wild stock has been domesticated under hatchery conditions at the AAGRDI for one generation. Generally, a good base population for genetic improvement program requires high genetic variation as well as an ideally suitable stock that can be well adapted for each of different local environments. Therefore, all proper crosses of these three stocks need to be cultured in different areas of the country and then evaluated on both performance and genetic variation before selective breeding program takes place.
  • Meeting report

    Preliminary pages 

    Anon. - 2005 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center (SEAFDEC/AQD)
  • Meeting report

    List of participants. 

    Anon. - 2005 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center (SEAFDEC/AQD)
  • Meeting report

    Discussion and field trip 

    Anon. - 2005 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center (SEAFDEC/AQD)
  • Meeting report

    Future plan of action and recommendations 

    Anon. - 2005 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center (SEAFDEC/AQD)
  • Meeting report

    Report of the round table discussion 

    Anon. - 2005 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center (SEAFDEC/AQD)
  • Meeting report

    Genetic improvement of Macrobrachium rosenbergii in Indonesia. 

    E Nugroho, K Sugana & Mr. Maskur - 2005 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center (SEAFDEC/AQD)
    One way of increasing the production of freshwater prawn is through a genetic improvement program. The GI Macro seeds (Genetically Improved Macrobrachium rosenbergii) that Indonesia developed have been released to farmers since 2001. However, producing 50 g prawns have become difficult with survival rate of as low as 40% after 9-11 months of culture. Thus, the program to improve growth rate and increase the edible portion of the prawn was conducted.

    Giant freshwater prawn is an important commodity that is successfully cultured in Indonesia. Its culture has been developed in several areas of West Java, i.e., Ciamis (Tambaksari, Pamarican and Kalipucang) and Tasikmalaya. The Indonesian Government has developed a hatchery in Jogjakarta province (Central Java), while the private sector control about seven hatcheries. In East Java, freshwater prawn is cultured in brackishwater ponds. Freshwater prawn culture has also spread to some areas of Bali Island, e.g., in Gianyar, Klungkung, Buleleng and Tabanan.

    Indonesia has been recognized as the center of origin of the giant freshwater prawn because about 19 identified species are found in almost all islands of the country (Holthuis, 1980). However, this genetic resource is not yet fully used in freshwater prawn culture. Although freshwater prawn culture has been widely developed in Indonesia, some problems have been encountered, e.g., declining growth rate, disease, and the small edible portion (abdominal muscle).

    In recent years, the Government of Indonesia has stressed the need to increase the production of freshwater prawn. One way to increase production is through the genetic improvement program. In 2001, the GI Macro (Genetically Improved Macrobrachium rosenbergii), strain of freshwater prawn has been developed and released to farmers.
  • Meeting report

    Collection of wild stocks, domestication and propagation of Macrobrachium rosenbergii 

    WR Rosario & EC Roxas - 2005 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center (SEAFDEC/AQD)
    There is an expanding interest in the culture of freshwater prawn in the Philippines. This is attributed to the extensive campaign of the government, the Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources (BFAR) and some private entrepreneurs to disseminate information and seeds of the prawn nationwide.

    Although freshwater aquaculture in the Philippines is still dominated by tilapia, which is an exotic fish, the profit from tilapia culture is not well appreciated except for family consumption or nutrition purposes. The freshwater prawn, an indigenous species, remains to be an important species. With freshwater prawn as an alternative species, farmers can diversify and derive higher profit from their ponds. In the Philippines, Macrobrachium rosenbergii stocked in 2,000 m2 ponds may grow to about 45 g after four months and 90 to 100 g in seven months of culture (Rosario, 2002). The price of the species is five times higher than tilapia.

    During the first Round Table Discussion on the Development of Genetically Improved Strain of Macrobrachium held at the Freshwater Aquaculture Development Center, Sukabumi, West Java, Indonesia in November 2003, the delegates from Thailand reported that the Philippine wild stocks of Macrobrachium, M. rosenbergii rosenbergii Philippine strain could be a better variety and therefore must be protected from contamination by non-indigenous strains. The report supports and confirms the importance of the activity of the National Integrated Fisheries and Development Center (NIFTDC) to collect live specimens of various strains of Macrobrachium in the country and review their performance in terms of growth and fecundity.
  • Meeting report

    The freshwater prawn research at SEAFDEC/AQD. 

    MR Eguia - 2005 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center (SEAFDEC/AQD)
    Research and commercial production of the freshwater prawn, Macrobrachium sp., in the Philippines are yet not well-developed. Although studies on Macrobrachium sp. (or ulang as it is locally known), started at the Binangonan Freshwater Station (BFS) of SEAFDEC/AQD in the mid-1980s, research efforts were discontinued soon thereafter because of: (a) inadequate technical skills; (b) problems with larval rearing and the domestication of wild stocks; and (c) the Macrobrachium sp. is being considered in the Philippines as a low priority species in contrast to commercially important freshwater commodities like tilapia and milkfish.

    That was two decades ago and in retrospect, researches continued and the freshwater prawn in the Philippines could have been successfully domesticated and current problems concerning the limited aquaculture production of genetically depauperate non-indigenous stocks could have been resolved. With the renewed interest in the culture of alternative species like the freshwater prawn, researchers at the Binangonan Freshwater Station (BFS) started to conduct some studies on the refinement of breeding, larval rearing and culture of Macrobrachium rosenbergii since 2003.

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