Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorGacutan, Rogelio Q.
dc.contributor.authorPrimavera, Jurgenne
dc.contributor.editorTaki, Yasuhiko
dc.contributor.editorPrimavera, Jurgenne H.
dc.contributor.editorLlobrera, Jose A.
dc.date.accessioned2012-04-20T03:41:13Z
dc.date.available2012-04-20T03:41:13Z
dc.date.issued1985
dc.identifier.citationPrimavera, J. H., & Gacutan, R. Q. (1985). Ruppia maritima and Najas graminea as natural foods for Penaeus monodon juveniles (Abstract only). In Taki Y., Primavera J.H. and Llobrera J.A. (Eds.). Proceedings of the First International Conference on the Culture of Penaeid Prawns/Shrimps, 4-7 December 1984, Iloilo City, Philippines (pp. 182-183). Iloilo City, Philippines: Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center.en
dc.identifier.isbn9718511008
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10862/920
dc.descriptionAbstract only.en
dc.description.abstractRuppia maritima (kusay-kusay, Hiligaynon) and Najas graminea (digman, Hiligaynon) are macrophytes growing in local brackishwater ponds believed to provide food and shelter to prawns and fishes. Their effect on growth and survival of Penaeus monodon juveniles (PL50; carapace length, 4.01 mm; body weight, 0.053 g) were studied in 80-ℓ glass aquaria. The treatments were: (a) a commercial pellet (40% protein); (b) live Ruppia; (c) decaying Ruppia; (d) live Najas; and (e) decaying Najas. The pellet was offered to satiety (approx. 100% of body weight) twice daily. Live Ruppia and Najas were transplanted in the aquaria using pond soil a week prior to the experiment. Decaying Ruppia and Najas were transferred from ponds. Salinity was maintained at 15 ppt and 50% of the water was changed regularly. Highly significant differences (P < 0.01) in mean carapace length (CL) and mean body weight (BW) on the 10th, 20th and 30th days were observed among treatments. Increase in CL was fastest with decaying Najas and slowest in live Ruppia (14% vs. 17% after 30 days). Growth with decaying Ruppia was comparable to pellets on the 10th and 20th days but was faster after 30 days. Body weight on all sampling days was highest in decaying Najas and lowest in live Ruppia. Percentage increases were 122, 273 and 565% on the 10th, 20th and 30th days, respectively, with decaying Najas. Those given live Ruppia registered increases of 11, 67 and 94%, respectively. The rapid growth rate of animals on decaying Najas was compensated negatively by a low survival rate (31%), significantly lower than on live Najas (100%). Other survival percentages were: decaying Ruppia, 59% and pellet, 53%.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherAquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Centeren
dc.subjectDietsen
dc.subjectFood organismen
dc.subjectJuvenilesen
dc.subjectShrimp cultureen
dc.subjectNajas gramineaen
dc.subjectPenaeus monodonen
dc.subjectRuppia maritimaen
dc.subjectPhilippinesen
dc.titleRuppia maritima and Najas graminea as natural foods for Penaeus monodon juvenilesen
dc.typeConference posteren
dc.citation.spage182
dc.citation.epage183
dc.citation.conferenceTitleProceedings of the First International Conference on the Culture of Penaeid Prawns/Shrimps, 4-7 December 1984, Iloilo City, Philippinesen


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record