Recent Submissions

  • magazineArticle

    Searching for ecological ways to reduce WSSV impact 

    R Bosma, E Tendencia, M Verdegem & J Verreth - Aquaculture Asia, 2014 - Network of Aquaculture Centres in Asia-Pacific
    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) has brought financial losses to all shrimp farming systems, and lately the “Early Mortality Syndrome” (EMS) or more accurately termed Acute Hepatopancreatic Necrosis Disease (AHPND) have added to the threats to shrimp farming in South Asia. Most studies on WSSV have been done in tanks with species other than Penaeus monodon. Several studies of RESCOPAR aimed to study WSSV epidemiology in on-farm situations and find ecological means of disease prevention or control. To achieve these goals experimental, cross-sectional, longitudinal and case studies were carried out by PhDs in Indonesia, the Philippines (Tendencia, 2012) and Vietnam.
  • magazineArticle

    Sandfish culture technology developed 

    M Castaños - Agriculture Magazine, 2011 - Manila Bulletin Publishing Corporation
  • magazineArticle

    Sandfish: Profitable sea cucumbers also supply bioremediation 

    MT Castaños, RV Ledesma, KG Corre & EG de Jesus-Ayson - Global Aquaculture Advocate, 2011 - Global Aquaculture Alliance
    Sandfish, a type of sea cucumber, are both a high-value culture species and one that supports the aquaculture of other fish species by cleaning up waste on the bottoms of ponds or sea cages. Hatchery and nursery technologies for sandfish are being continuously refined by Vietnam’s Research Institute of Aquaculture No. 3, the Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center and their partners. These technologies have also been initially transferred to the private sector through a training course and manual.
  • magazineArticle

    Application of GIS in shrimp disease surveillance and monitoring 

    CR Lavilla-Pitogo & JB Biñas - GIS Link, 2009 - National Mapping and Resource Information Authority
  • magazineArticle

    DNA markers help manage Nile tilapia stocks 

    MRR Eguia & N Taniguchi - Global Aquaculture Advocate, 2006 - Global Aquaculture Alliance
    Determining changes in the genetic diversity of selected hatchery stocks through DNA-level polymorphisms analysis provides aquaculturists with a means to monitor inbreeding, control loss of genetic diversity, and achieve sustainable levels of genetic gain in the development of improved stocks. Tests with selected and domesticated tilapia stocks in the Philippines revealed variability between marker system results.
  • magazineArticle

    SEAFDEC AQD: Facilities and activities 

    RR Platon & WG Yap - World Aquaculture, 2002 - World Aquaculture Society
    As an R & D complex in aquaculture that can conduct replicated studies in marine waters, brackish water and freshwater, be it in aquaria, large tanks, earthen ponds or cages, there are not that many institutions in the world like the SEAFDEC Aquaculture Department (AQD). SEAFDEC AQD is one of four departments of the Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center, a regional treaty organization with headquarters in Bangkok, Thailand. Starting with six countries when the SEAFDEC treaty was signed in 1969, SEAFDEC now includes Brunei Darusalam, Cambodia, Indonesia, Japan, Malaysia, Myanmar, the Philippines, Singapore, Thailand and Vietnam. The other three SEAFDEC departments are the Training Department (TD) in Thailand, the Marine Fisheries Research Department (MFRD) in Singapore and the Marine Fishery Resources Development and Management Department (MFRDMD) in Malaysia. Among the four departments, the Aquaculture Department, established in 1973 and hosted by the government of the Philippines, is the largest.
  • magazineArticle

    Seaweed production: Farming Kappaphycus in the Philippines 

    AQ Hurtado - Global Aquaculture Advocate, 2002 - Global Aquaculture Alliance
  • magazineArticle

    Seed production of mud crab Scylla spp. 

    ET Quinitio, FD Parado-Estepa & E Rodriguez - Aquaculture Asia, 2002 - Network of Aquaculture Centers
    Mud crab farming is an important source of income for fish farmers in the Philippines. The expanding export market for mud crab as an alternative for shrimp has led to intensified collection of wild seed for grow-out and has threatened the wild stocks. To ensure the sustainability of crab farming and reduce the fishing pressure on wild stocks, the SEAFDEC Aquaculture Department developed a technology for large-scale production of juvenile mud crabs, Scylla serrata (giant mud crab), S. olivacea (orange mud crab) and S. tranquebarica (purple mud crab).
  • magazineArticle

    Seed production of the crucifix crab Charybdis feriatus 

    FD Parado-Estepa, ET Quinitio & EM Rodriguez - Aquaculture Asia, 2002 - Network of Aquaculture Centers
  • magazineArticle

    Breeding and seed production of the mangrove red snapper 

    AC Emata - Aquaculture Asia, 2002 - Network of Aquaculture Centers
  • magazineArticle

    Tropical abalone culture in Philippines 

    AC Fermin - Global Aquaculture Advocate, 2001 - Global Aquaculture Alliance