Now showing items 1-20 of 117

    • Book | Conference publication

      Advances in milkfish biology and culture: proceedings of the Second International Milkfish Aquaculture Conference, 4-8 October 1983, Iloilo City, Philippines 

      JV Juario, RP Ferraris & LV Benitez (Eds.) - 1984 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center; International Development Research Centre; Island Publishing House, Inc.
      Abstracts of the 17 papers presented at the conference are cited individually in this issue.
    • Book chapter

      Aquaculture marketing 

      DB Baticados - In Training Handbook on Rural Aquaculture, 2009 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
    • Book chapter

      Aquafeed: formulation, processing of feed ingredients and feed preparation 

      MR Catacutan - In Training Handbook on Rural Aquaculture, 2009 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
    • Book

      An assessment of the coastal resources of Ibajay and Tangalan, Aklan: Implications for management 

      LMB Garcia (Ed.) - 2001 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
      This report describes the present state of marine resources in several coastal barangays of Ibajay and Tangalan, Aklan (Philippines). Field data were obtained from rapid surveys conducted from July to September 1998. Recommendations based on analyses of the data will guide fisherfolk and other stakeholders, particularly the local government units, in their development plans for these neighboring municipalities. Both land and marine products in the area are mainly harvested for the local market. All coastal barangays are dependent on fishing for their livelihood. The medium-scale municipal fishery of Tangalan employs several passive (encircling gill net, bag net, fish corral) and active gears (baby purse seine) compared with the traditional fishing methods employed by Ibajay fishers. Pond aquaculture in mangrove areas is well-developed in Ibajay West (barangays Aquino and Ondoy) and in Tangalan. However, ownership of these ponds is limited to a few individuals and families, unlike in Barangay Bugtong Bato where informal ownership distributed among families has been the traditional rule. Nonetheless, the introduction of so-called environment-friendly methods of utilizing mangroves (e.g., aquasilviculture) and other shared coastal resources may seriously undermine the informal rights-based social structures in the barangays. Without proper rules and enforcement, the application of these methods may be misused, aggravating the already poor overall state of their coastal resources. Major problems affecting their fishing livelihood include siltation of nearshore waters due to illegal deforestation upland, encroachment of municipal fishing grounds by commercial and other fishers elsewhere, and the lack of capital to finance the fishery. Weak inter-organizational links among government and non-government organizations have hampered the implementation of solutions to these common problems in coastal barangays. For instance, a conflict between fishers from these neighboring municipalities over territorial boundaries of common fishing grounds in Pangayawan and Pungtod reefs has not been resolved over the years. Likewise, the introduction of aquasilviculture in mangrove areas may become a potent source of conflict among resource-users who maintain informal rights over the mangrove resource. The overall state of coastal resources in these municipalities is in immediate need of a unified plan to promote both their preservation and conservation. To achieve this end, a joint resource management council representing all resource-users from both municipalities must be organized and convened. To address the presently weak inter-organizational links among existing organizations, this joint council may provide a legitimate forum to identify, resolve, integrate, implement, and enforce guidelines on the common use of resources, both marine and inland. Low estimated yields from the reef fishery, conversion of mangroves for aquaculture beyond the allowable limit, a persistent conflict over fishing rights in several reefs offshore, the limited resources for seaweed and fish mariculture, and threats on existing traditional social structures by progressive resource-users are several issues that require thorough discussions to formulate popularly approved and acceptable management strategies. These strategies include community-based approaches of co-managing resources such as "no-take zones" (sanctuaries), ecotourism development, and livelihood schemes to mitigate, in part, the pressure of over-exploitation of fishery resources.
    • Book chapter

      Bacterial diseases 

      EV Alapide-Tendencia & LD de la Peña - In GD Lio-Po & Y Inui (Eds.), Health Management in Aquaculture, 2010 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
      Fish and crustaceans that are not weakened by poor environmental conditions, or by other causes, such as parasitic infestation, nutritional deficiency, handling stress, or chemical intoxication, are more resistant to bacterial infections. This is due to the presence of a large amount of bactericidal substances in the blood, which helps overcome infections. So, the best precaution against the occurrence of bacterial infections is to provide the fish with optimum environmental conditions, adequate amounts of the right kinds of food and avoidance of stress, including overcrowding. Vaccination/ immunization and genetic manipulation (i.e., the development of specific pathogen resistant fry) are also some ways of preventing bacterial diseases. The use of antibiotics should always be an option of the last resort.
    • Book chapter

      Bacterial diseases 

      EV Alapide-Tendencia & LD de la Peña - In GD Lio-Po, CR Lavilla & ER Cruz-Lacierda (Eds.), Health Management in Aquaculture, 2001 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
      Fish and crustaceans that are not weakened by poor environmental conditions, or by other causes, such as parasitic infestation, nutritional deficiency, handling stress, or chemical intoxication, are more resistant to bacterial infections. This is due to the presence of a large amount of bactericidal substances in the blood, which helps overcome infections. So, the best precaution against the occurrence of bacterial infections is to provide the fish with optimum environmental conditions, adequate amounts of the right kinds of food and avoidance of stress, including overcrowding. Vaccination/ immunization and genetic manipulation (i.e., the development of specific pathogen resistant fry) are also some ways of preventing bacterial diseases. The use of antibiotics should always be an option of the last resort.
    • Book chapter

      Bacterial isolation, identification and storage 

      L Ruangpan & EA Tendencia - In Laboratory manual of standardized methods for antimicrobial sensitivity tests for bacteria isolated from aquatic animals and environment, 2004 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
      Bacterial isolation, purification and identification are the first steps to bacteriological studies. Isolation is done to obtain pure bacterial cultures. Bacteria are usually isolated from fish kidney and spleen; and from the hepatopancreas, lymphoid organ and muscles of shrimp. These tissues are monitor organs that usually harbor the disease-causing bacteria during infection.
    • Book chapter

      Basic epidemiological concepts for surveillance in aquaculture 

      I de Blas - In GD Lio-Po & Y Inui (Eds.), Health Management in Aquaculture, 2010 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
    • Book

      Biology and culture of Penaeus monodon 

      Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center, Aquaculture Department - 1988 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
      Series: BRAIS state-of-the-art series; no. 2
      Abstracts of the 6 chapters included in this publication are cited individually.
    • Book

      Biology and culture of siganids 

      MN Duray - 1998 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
      A 53-page monograph updating AQD's 1990 publication of the same title. The book includes siganid morphology, distribution and ecology; reproduction; fisheries; diseases and parasites; genetics. It also covers larval culture; fry and fingerling production; nutrition and feeds; and problem areas in aquaculture.
    • Book

      Biology of milkfish (Chanos chanos Forsskal) 

      TU Bagarinao - 1991 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
      An up-to-date account is given of the biology of milkfish (Chanos chanos) under the following chapter headings: Species identity and history; geographic distribution and variation; life history and habitat; food and feeding habits; age, growth and mortality; reproduction; behavior; environmental physiology; and, community relationships.
    • Book chapter

      Business planning and management for sustainable small-scale rural aquaculture 

      RF Agbayani - In Training Handbook on Rural Aquaculture, 2009 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
    • Book chapter

      Chapter 1. Detection of antibiotic residues in aquaculture products 

      JNP Chuan - In Laboratory manual of standardized methods for the analysis of pesticide and antibiotic residue in aquaculture products, 2004 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
      Aquacultured animals are under constant threat from bio-aggressors such as viruses, bacteria, parasites and fungi. These organisms harm either spontaneously or through aquatic animal husbandry practices, and often both. Indeed, it is generally recognized that disease problems follow the development of techniques for animal production.

      Consequently, fish culture uses a variety of chemicals that represent potential threats to the health of the cultured animal, indigenous biota, and even humans. Chemicals employed in aquaculture include the following:

      - Drugs used to treat disease (chemical therapeutants)

      - Chemicals introduced through construction materials

      - Hormones used to alter reproductive viability, sex, and growth rates

      Of these, chemotherapeutic drugs are the most harmful. Chemotherapeutic treatments are initiated after clinical signs of a disease appear in a population of fish. Chemicals used in construction and hormones are not considered because they are relatively non-toxic.

      The use of chemical therapeutants obviously leads to the transit of drugs and to their persistence in products intended for human consumption. It also leads to the release of drugs or their metabolites to the aquatic environment. Hence the criticisms raised in the press against the use of chemotherapy in aquaculture, and the restrictive legislation set up in many countries under pressure of public opinion. It sometimes appears that people would believe that drug resistance of bacteria responsible for human infections originates exclusively, or almost exclusively, from consumption of animal products such as those provided by aquaculture.

      It should be noted that in addition to the chemicals that are deliberately used, fish raised in aquaculture are also susceptible to contamination via pesticides present in feed, agriculture run-off water, and sediments. The magnitude of human exposure to these sources has not yet been fully assessed and should be examined periodically in light of the growth and change in this sector of the seafood industry.
    • Book chapter

      Chapter 2. Detection of pesticide residues in aquaculture products 

      IG Borlongan - In Laboratory manual of standardized methods for the analysis of pesticide and antibiotic residue in aquaculture products, 2004 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
      Agricultural chemicals such as fertilizers and pesticides have made an important contribution to agriculture. Pesticides protect crops from pests and diseases. They have brought about large yield increases, and have helped ensure that the rise in food production has kept well ahead of the rise in population. However, there is a growing concern about the safe use of these chemicals, and the potential dangers to farmers who use them, the environment, and consumers. There is particular concern about pesticides, since almost all chemicals that can kill pests are also potentially damaging to human health.

      Legislation requires that pesticide use is appropriately controlled and maximum residue levels (MRLs) not be exceeded. The level of pesticide residues in food raw materials is a measurable standard. But while residue analysis is essential for companies wishing to assure themselves that their products have been produced in accordance with best practice and within the law, it can be used to greatest effect when targeted at samples most likely to contain residues.

      Reliable residue analytical methods are necessary to measure the magnitude of residue in a seafood, and to enforce legal residue limits (tolerances). Sample preparation and extraction, clean up of extracts and pesticide detection are the main procedures in pesticide residue analysis. There is an interplay among these factors which should be considered in the choice of a particular method.
    • Book chapter

      Coral reefs 

      CL Marte - In Training Handbook on Rural Aquaculture, 2009 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
    • Book | Conference publication

      Culture and use of algae in Southeast Asia. Proceedings of the Symposium on Culture and Utilization of Algae in Southeast Asia, 8-11 December 1981, Tigbauan, Iloilo, Philippines 

      IJ Dogma Jr., GC Trono Jr. & RA Tabbada (Eds.) - 1990 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
      Abstracts of the 13 papers presented at the symposium are cited individually. A variety of topics were covered, including the culture of micro and macroalgae, the processing of algal products and their utilization in industry as natural feed for aquaculture animals, the status of seaweed resources and their production, and the biology and use of algal populations as an indicator of the state of the aquatic environment.
    • Book chapter

      Development and management of cooperatives for sustainable fisheries and aquaculture 

      DB Baticados - In Training Handbook on Rural Aquaculture, 2009 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
    • Book chapter

      Development communication work at SEAFDEC/AQD 

      MT Castaños - In Training Handbook on Rural Aquaculture, 2009 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
    • Book chapter

      Disease development 

      CR Lavilla-Pitogo - In GD Lio-Po & Y Inui (Eds.), Health Management in Aquaculture, 2010 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
      Disease occurrence is one of the biggest deterrents to sustainable production in aquaculture. It is therefore important to enhance awareness among various sectors of the importance of health management in the aquaculture industry. This can be done through education and information dissemination. Students in fisheries and veterinary medicine need to have adequate background information on the aquatic animal disease and health management to understand the problems and needs of a fast-growing aquaculture industry. Recognizing disease signs early and using mortality pattern as a clue to the disease agent involved will not only make diagnosis easier, but it will also prevent massive losses by timely implementation of remedial measures.