Recent Submissions

  • Book chapter

    Bacterial loads in hatcheries and virulence of Vibrio spp. to larvae of the tiger shrimp Penaeus monodon 

    JL Torres - In T Bagarinao (Ed.), Research Output of the Fisheries Sector Program, 2007 - Bureau of Agricultural Research, Department of Agriculture
    Shrimp hatcheries are high-density systems and are prone to diseases. A small-scale and a large-scale hatchery for the tiger shrimp Penaeus monodon in Iloilo, Philippines were monitored over two months for water quality and shrimp survival. Water quality (water temperature, pH, salinity, dissolved oxygen, and specific gravity) was not significantly different between the two hatcheries. However, the small hatchery seemed to favor survival of eggs to early postlarval stages, whereas the large hatchery favored the survival of late postlarvae. The normal microflora and bacterial loads of tiger shrimp eggs, larvae, postlarvae, and rearing water were determined to identify the dominant bacteria and potential pathogens. Shrimp eggs harbored the lowest heterotrophic bacterial counts. The counts increased from the nauplii to the mysis stages, decreased during the mysis stage, and then gradually increased in the older larvae. Bacterial loads in the rearing water reflected those in raw sea water and reservoir-aged sea water. Vibrio, Pseudomonas, and Aeromonas were not detected in eggs but were found in postlarvae. Ubiquitous in sea water, these bacteria increased with the build-up of organic matter. The bacterial load in the water adversely affected larval survival. Forty bacterial strains were isolated from tiger shrimp eggs, larvae, postlarvae, from the feeds, and from the rearing water. These were tested for biochemical characteristics and segregated into eight groups or genera. Six genera were found in the mysis and five genera in the postlarvae. The Vibrio species were dominant. Only Escherichia spp. were present in feeds, whereas five genera were present in the rearing water. Only Vibrio and Pseudomonas were present in both larvae and water. Moraxella, Aeromonas, and Klebsiella were found in larvae but not in rearing water. Micrococcus and coryneforms were found only in rearing water. Four Vibrio isolates were tested for virulence against shrimp postlarvae at inoculation densities of 102 and 107 cfu/ml. The four Vibrio species caused mortality of postlarvae, and more at the higher inoculation density. The most virulent was Vibrio anguillarum—30% of postlarvae died after 24 h exposure to a bacterial density of 102 cfu/ml, and all larvae died after 48 h at 107 cfu/ml. Shrimp hatcheries must have protocols for hygiene and sanitation and for disease prevention and control.
  • Book chapter

    Socioeconomic profile of tuna fishers in northwestern Luzon 

    VR Panay & NL Ledda - In TU Bagarinao (Ed.), Research Output of the Fisheries Sector Program, 2007 - Bureau of Agricultural Research, Department of Agriculture
    A study of tuna fishers in northwestern Luzon (Region I) was done by means of a questionnaire. The 511 respondents included 178 from Ilocos Sur, 200 from La Union, and 133 from Pangasinan. Most of them were younger than 50 years, had basic education, married with large families of 3-9 children, owned the houses they lived in, and had low annual incomes of about P35,000. Fishing was their sole means of livelihood for almost all the respondents, except some for whom farming supplemented the income from fishing. Majority worked every night or day, 36% went fishing every other night or day, and 13% went fishing five times a week. Most fishers went out to sea at night. Fully 52% of the fishers worked within 50 km from shore; 38% fished within 51–100 km, and the others went out farther than 100 km and even 200 km. La Union fishers worked closest to shore (average 38 km) and Pangasinan fishers the farthest (average 92 km). More than 90% of all fishers used motorized bancas, which made it possible for them to fish farther out to sea. Only 36% of the fishers owned the boats and fishing gears they used, and most did not. In all three provinces, the capital for the fishing enterprise came mainly from savings. The average cost of motorized boats was P31,200; non-motorized boats, P1,200. Longlining was the most preferred fishing method in the region. Hand lining was the second most preferred in Ilocos Sur and Pangasinan. Gillnetting and other methods (rabuk, kawil, pana, and bira-bira) were ranked third and fourth, and trawling was the least preferred. Drift gill nets used for tunas cost on average P680; tuna long lines, about P600; tuna hand lines, P345; and troll lines, P750. The main species caught by the fishers were skipjack tuna, yellowfin tuna, frigate tuna, Spanish mackerel, rainbow runner, dolphinfish, sailfish, blue marlin, and threadfins. In Ilocos Sur, most fishers reported catches of 11-20 kg in one trip, and a few fishers caught 50 kg. Spanish mackerel and sailfish gave the fishers better incomes than the other species. Fish catches and prices and fisher incomes in La Union were lower than in Ilocos Sur. Threadfins were more abundant in La Union. Fishers in Pangasinan did not catch sailfin, marlin, or threadfins, but caught higher volumes (20–60 kg/trip) of the other species.
  • Book chapter

    Use of soybean meal and rice bran in formulated diets for the grouper Epinephelus coioides 

    ET Marasigan, SL Miag-ao & AE Serrano - In T Bagarinao (Ed.), Research Output of the Fisheries Sector Program, 2007 - Bureau of Agricultural Research, Department of Agriculture
    Two diets were formulated to include 8–14% soybean meal and 9–18% rice bran, 34–40% fish meal, 4–5% mussel meal, and 7–8% Acetes shrimp meal, and 11–13% cod liver oil. Soy bean meal and rice bran were included at 4:1 ratio together to replace 12.5% and 25% of the animal protein sources in the two diets. The two diets were prepared in dry D form and moist M form. The four test diets, D12.5, M12.5, D25, and M25 diets had 40–42% protein and 4,000 kcal/g gross energy. The control diet used was a dry diet with 44% crude protein and 4,260 kcal/g, made with 30% Peruvian fish meal, 8% squid meal, 22% Acetes shrimp meal, 8% cod liver oil, 8% soybean oil, but no plant protein sources. The five diets were fed to juvenile grouper (mean weights ranging from 1.63 ± 0.47 to 2.41 ± 0.91 g) in indoor 400 L concrete tanks (10 fish per tank). After 10 weeks, growth, feed intake, feed conversion ratios (1.2–2.2), and survival (60–80%) of juvenile grouper were not significantly different between the test diets and the control. The carcass composition of the harvested grouper was not significantly different among diets. Protein utilization was best among the fish fed the test diet D12.5. This study showed that soybean meal and rice bran at 4:1 ratio can be included in formulated diets for grouper to replace 12.5% to 25% of the animal protein sources. However, the results for the test diets may also have been due to other factors - the high fish meal content, inclusion of mussel meal, and increase in cod liver oil.
  • Book chapter

    Domestic effluents and pollution in Imbang River, Negros Occidental 

    GA Gonzales - In T Bagarinao (Ed.), Research Output of the Fisheries Sector Program, 2007 - Bureau of Agricultural Research, Department of Agriculture
    Domestic effluents, or waste waters from human settlements, were sampled from eight stations along Imbang River in Negros Occidental from July 1993 to February 1995. Three types of domestic waste waters were produced by communities along Imbang River. Waste waters from clothes washing, house cleaning, and bathing, including washings of domestic animals and holding pens and run-off from rains and storms were conveyed by open canals and ditches to the river. This type of domestic effluents were well aerated and had the least potential to degrade the rivers. Waste waters from kitchens and markets carried large volumes of food scraps and other solid wastes, were unsightly, and smelled bad from the decomposition of garbage. Overflows from septic tanks were the most objectionable domestic effluents with offensive visual and olfactory properties. Domestic effluents had pH 4–7.6, dissolved oxygen of 0.5–7.2 ppm, and biochemical oxygen demand ranging from 2 to 240 ppm. The overflows from septic tanks were of the worst quality, with BOD 20x greater than household washings, and 6x more than kitchen and market effluents. Fecal coliform bacteria made up 93% of the total coliforms in the septic tank overflows, 86% in kitchen and market waste waters, and 39% in household washings. The domestic effluents from the communities around Imbang River had higher than allowable levels of BOD and solids. The 11 barangays with 16,486 households and 85,535 people loaded about 3,4000 m3 of waste water into the river every day. Along with the waste water were 180 mt/yr of BOD, 590 mt/yr of total solids, plus large quantities of nutrients, surfactants, and fecal coliform bacteria.
  • Book chapter

    Diet and sexual maturity of yellowfin and skipjack tuna taken by hand lines from fish-aggregating 'payaw' off northwestern Luzon 

    JR Mamhot & ER Verceles - In TU Bagarinao (Ed.), Research Output of the Fisheries Sector Program, 2007 - Bureau of Agricultural Research, Department of Agriculture
    Skipjack tuna Katsuwonus pelamis and yellowfin or albacore tuna Thunnus albacares taken by hand lines from the 'payaw' off La Union and Ilocos Sur were sampled from April 1994 until August 1995. Skipjack ranged from 28 cm to 59 cm in fork length and from 0.35 to 4.2 kg in weight. Yellowfin ranged 24–67 cm and 0.25–6.4 kg. The common size landed was about 40 cm for both species. Size at first maturity of skipjack was about 41 cm in males and 42 cm in females. The yellowfin tuna taken by hand lines were almost all immature except two mature males about 60 cm long. About 18 prey species were identified in the stomachs of skipjack, and about 25 prey species in yellowfin. The preferred prey were mantis shrimps and squids. Small fishes and other invertebrates were also eaten. Mesopelagic lanternfish were eaten by yellowfin and epipelagic jellyfish were eaten by skipjack.
  • Book chapter

    Treatment of shrimp pond effluents by sedimentation and by seaweed and mussel biofiltration 

    NR Fortes & VL Corre Jr. - In T Bagarinao (Ed.), Research Output of the Fisheries Sector Program, 2007 - Bureau of Agricultural Research, Department of Agriculture
    Tiger shrimp Penaeus monodon were stocked in three 1,000 m2 ponds at 12,000 juveniles/pond and grown for 141 days. Water quality in the ponds was monitored over the grow-out period, particularly before and after every water change. BOD, chlorophyll a, and total dissolved solids of the effluent increased over the grow-out period due to increased biomass and feed input. Similar trends were observed for inorganic nitrogen, reactive phosphorus, total suspended solids, and hydrogen sulfide. Concentrations decreased after draining and reflooding. Soil samples also showed increases in organic matter available phosphate, carbon, and nitrogen content over the grow-out period.

    Effluents from semi-intensive shrimp ponds were discharged into eight treatment ponds (each 200 m2): three sedimentation ponds, three with Gracilaria stocked at 20 kg/pond, and two with mussels stocked at 10/m2. Measurements were made of pH, ammonia, nitrite, nitrate, reactive phosphorus, biochemical oxygen demand, chlorophyll a, total suspended solids, and total dissolved solids in the water in the treatment ponds after effluent addition, one week and two weeks later, and before draining. Soil pH, organic matter, and phosphorus were also analyzed every two weeks. The changes in these variables were similar among the three treatments in the eight ponds. In this study, water quality of effluents improved after one week in the treatment ponds.
  • Book chapter

    Transplantation, hatchery, and grow-out of window-pane oyster Placuna placenta in Guimaras and Iloilo 

    SS Garibay, SN Golez & AS Unggui - In T Bagarinao (Ed.), Research Output of the Fisheries Sector Program, 2007 - Bureau of Agricultural Research, Department of Agriculture
    The windowpane oyster Placuna placenta (local name kapis) used to be harvested in large quantities and support a shellcraft industry in the Philippines, particularly in Panay Island. But the fishery and the industry declined markedly by the 1990s. Studies were conducted to transplant kapis and also to develop hatchery techniques for it in an effort to counter the population depletion. Kapis with average shell heights of 7 cm and 10 cm were transplanted from Roxas City in northern Panay Island and from Oton, Iloilo in southern Panay to Taklong Island in Guimaras during the rainy season (July–November) and the dry season (February–June). Survival of the transplants was higher during the dry season (57–60%) than during the rains (35–48%). Sexually mature kapis 10 cm in shell height were induced to spawn by temperature manipulation, water level manipulation, and use of ultravioletirradiated sea water. Spawning was successfully induced by raising the water temperature to 29±0.5oC. Eggs measured 45 μm on average, and fecundity was 5,000–10,000 per female. Kapis larvae were reared on a combination of the microalgae Isochrysis galbana, Tetraselmis sp., and Chaetoceros calcitrans, maintained at a density of 100,000 cells/ml. Three water treatment schemes were tested for larval rearing: chlorination, ultraviolet irradiation, and filtration (control). Larvae survived to the umbo veliger stage (180 μm, day 10) in chlorinated sea water whereas mass mortality occurred at the straight-hinge stage (days 4–) in both UV-treated and filtered sea water.
  • Book chapter

    Grow-out of the tiger shrimp Penaeus monodon in floating net cages in Batan Bay, northern Panay 

    JG Genodepa, MJ Sanoy & G Banehit - In T Bagarinao (Ed.), Research Output of the Fisheries Sector Program, 2007 - Bureau of Agricultural Research, Department of Agriculture
    The effects of two stocking densities and two feed combinations on growth, survival and production of the giant tiger shrimp Penaeus monodon in floating net cages were studied in an attempt to refine the existing technology on cage culture of tiger shrimp for the benefit of small- and medium-scale fish farmers. Four treatments were tested, replicated in time: stocking density of 100 shrimp/m2, feeding with 70% commercial shrimp pellets P and 30% 'trash fish' F; 100 shrimp/m2 and 50% P + 50% F; 200 shrimp/m2 and 70% P + 30% F; and 200 shrimp/m2 and 50% P + 50% F. Harvested after 93–95 d, the shrimps at the lower density treatments were significantly larger and had greater proportion of good sizes (>18 g body weight). Although the combination of 70% P + 30% F resulted in better growth, the combination of 50% P + 50% F resulted in more good-size shrimps. Survival, production, and gross income were not significantly different among treatments. None of the treatments in this study was economically viable. Gross income was very low due to poor growth and survival, mostly due to luminous vibriosis, then a new disease that eventually wiped out many shrimp hatcheries and ponds around Panay Island.
  • Book chapter

    Adaptation of integrated fish-duck-pig farming system in Leyte 

    G Alcober - In T Bagarinao (Ed.), Research Output of the Fisheries Sector Program, 2007 - Bureau of Agricultural Research, Department of Agriculture
    Adaptation of a fish-duck-pig integrated farming system was conducted at the Busay Freshwater Experimental Farm in Babatngon, Leyte. Genetically improved farmed tilapia (GIFT) and common carp (at a ratio of 4:1) were stocked at densities of 3/m2 and 6/m2 in four earthen ponds; they were not given any commercial feed. Animal houses were built over the ponds and stocked with mallard ducks at a density of 375/ha, and piglets at 30/ha; they were given commercial feeds daily. After 154 days, the farming system produced a net yield of 1,685 kg fish/ha at a stocking density of 3/m2 and 2,808 kg/ha at 6/m2. Since water quality was not adversely affected, the higher stocking density of 6/m2 is a viable option. This farming system can be further improved and refined for better production and higher incomes.
  • Book chapter

    Assessment of grouper resources around Zamboanga City and Basilan, Philippines 

    NT Lasola, RA Samson & PB Domingo - In T Bagarinao (Ed.), Research Output of the Fisheries Sector Program, 2007 - Bureau of Agricultural Research, Department of Agriculture
    A total of 2,643 kg of groupers were collected from six markets (96% of the biomass) and from prescribed fish traps in three fishing grounds (106 kg, 4%) around Zamboanga City and Basilan from November 1993 to October 1994. The collection included 26 species in seven genera: Aethaloperca, Cephalopholis, Cromileptis, Epinephelus, Niphon, Plectropomus, and Variola. The three species of highest biomass were Epinephelus fasciatus (26%), Cephalopholis sonnerati (14%) and Cromileptis altivelis (13%). The least biomass was contributed by Epinephelus sexfasciatus (0.1%), Plectropomus areolatus (0.1%), and Cephalopholis sexmaculatus (0.3%). Grouper biomass was lower from November to April and greater from May to October. Groupers caught by the prescribed fish traps were mostly Epinephelus merra (50% of the total). The highest catch of grouper was 0.8 kg/fish trap around Sta. Cruz Island in July, and the highest catch of all demersal fishes was 7 kg/trap around Malamawi Island in September. On average, groupers made up less than 10% of the monthly catch of fish traps. The groupers collected from the markets and from the fish traps averaged 28 cm in total length— all young juveniles. Cromileptes altivelis (average 38 cm) were the largest individuals and Plectropomus spp. (36 cm) similarly so. The largest C. altivelis (1.5 kg) was caught in December and the smallest (0.8 kg) in April and August. The various Cephalopholis species averaged 31 cm, and the various Epinephelus species were smallest at 26 cm. Groupers were largest in December and smallest between January and May. Length-weight equations were derived for seven grouper species. Of the 78 grouper stomachs that were dissected, 52 were empty and 26 contained food, mainly crabs, anchovies, hermit crabs, soldierfish, squids, and shrimps. Groupers with mature and ripe varies had from 3,000 to 11,000 eggs per gram ovary.
  • Book chapter

    Grow-out of milkfish in net-walled marine pens in La Union 

    ND Domenden - In T Bagarinao (Ed.), Research Output of the Fisheries Sector Program, 2007 - Bureau of Agricultural Research, Department of Agriculture
    Grow-out of milkfish in 125 m2 net-walled marine pens was tested in Santo Tomas Cove, La Union at three stocking densities of 6, 9, and 12 fish/m2 and using commercial feed (crumbles and pellets) with 25–30% crude protein. After 115 days, survival of milkfish in marine pens was 92–97%. Fish stocked at 12/m2 or 1,500/pen grew to average weights of 286 g, larger than the fish stocked at lower densities. Feed conversion ratio was 2.3 at the highest density and worse at the lower densities. Costs and returns of milkfish grow-out in marine pens at three densities showed that feeds were the most costly component (55–69%) of production. The milkfish harvest was equivalent to about 33 mt/ha at the stocking of 120,000 fish/ha. Only at this high density was adequate profit made for a 48% return on investment per crop. Two crops are possible in the Ilocos region during the dry season from November to June. Grow-out of milkfish in marine pens can be improved if seed and feeds could be procured at lower cost.
  • Book chapter

    Households, agriculture, industry, fishing, and fish farming along Imbang River, Negros Occidental 

    RC Sanares - In T Bagarinao (Ed.), Research Output of the Fisheries Sector Program, 2007 - Bureau of Agricultural Research, Department of Agriculture
    Interviews were conducted among respondents identified from the households, agriculture farms, sugar mills, and fish farms along the whole stretch of Imbang River, Malisbog River, and Muyao Creek, down to Barangay Balaring at the coast of Silay City in Negros Occidental. Among the 1,073 households, 11% used river water for washing clothes, but 20% also used the rivers for disposal of waste waters, 11% for human wastes, and 13% for animal wastes. Among the 30 respondents from the agriculture sector, 70% discharged water into the river. The two sugar mills in the area treated waste waters partially before release into the rivers; one sugar mill also released wastes in a nearby rice field. Milling wastes such as bagasse, molasses, and mud press were reused and not dumped into the river. Imbang River was both the water source and wastewater sink for seven fish farms.
  • Book chapter

    Shrimp pond effluents and water quality in Imbang River, Negros Occidental 

    ET Taberna - In T Bagarinao (Ed.), Research Output of the Fisheries Sector Program, 2007 - Bureau of Agricultural Research, Department of Agriculture
    The contribution of shrimp farm effluents to the pollution load in Imbang River, Negros Occidental was measured during the period May 1993 to February 1995. Shrimp pond effluents were characterized and the pollution load estimated. The pond effluents had low average nitrite (0.0025 ppm) and nitrate (0.06 ppm) and optimum (for shrimp culture) pH 7.9, phosphate 0.15 ppm, dissolved oxygen 5.20 ppm, and salinity 23.3 ppt. Ammonia was 0.13 ppm on average in most farms, above the safe level for shrimp, and total suspended solids was 23 ppm, about 2.5x the allowed limit for effluents. Biochemical oxygen demand (20 ppm) and settleable solids (0.15 ppm) were still with acceptable limits. Residues of organochlorine pesticides were present at very low concentrations, well below the safe levels for aquatic life. Most of the pollution load came from the regular water exchanges over the 4-month crop cycle, at least every two weeks in low-density farms and more frequently in the high-density farms. The total draining of pond water at harvest contributed a minor load. Total solids from shrimp farms contributed a huge load, about 181,325 mt/yr. Total suspended solids contributed 1,285 mt/yr and settleable solids <1 mt/yr. The total BOD load was 154,367 kg/yr. The phosphate load was about 1,080 kg/yr, and the total nitrogen load was 1,225 kg/yr. The effects of effluent release from farms were localized. Upstream water quality and other uses of the river were not affected. Since most of the shrimp farms were located 1.5–2 km from the sea, the release of effluents during water exchange and at harvest did not adversely affect water quality downstream of these farms. Where such draining increased the levels of ammonia, phosphate, and total suspended solids in the river, the effect was significant only within 250 m from the release point, and the pollutants were dissipated about 550–800 m downstream The other water quality variables were at low levels in the pond effluents and did not affect the river water during draining. Often the concentrations of pollutants in the river were higher before than during draining of pond effluents. Stations upstream of the release sites of pond effluents often had high pollutant concentrations from other upstream sources.
  • Book chapter

    Collection of the orange-spotted grouper Epinephelus coioides from Tinagong Dagat and Sapian Bay in northern Panay 

    NB Solis - In T Bagarinao (Ed.), Research Output of the Fisheries Sector Program, 2007 - Bureau of Agricultural Research, Department of Agriculture
    In Capiz, northern Panay, grouper catches by hand picking, hook and line, shelters, and fish corral were low throughout the year, on average 1-3 fish from each fishing operation, but higher in Tinagong Dagat than in Sapian Bay. Epinephelus coioides was the most common of the three grouper species collected; E. quoyanus and E. malabaricus were not numerous. The 882 specimens of E. coioides from Tinagong Dagat measured from 3.6 to 39 cm in standard length; the 250 E. coioides from Sapian Bay were between 1.7 and 31.2 cm SL. The size distribution showed a modal length of about 17 cm SL (21% of the fish) in Tinagong Dagat, and 11 cm (26%) in Sapian Bay. Small juveniles 2–8 cm were collected from Tinagong Dagat in January-April 1993, but not in Jan-Apr 1994. Such small juveniles were also collected from Sapian Bay in January and in April–August 1993. Groupers 9–23 cm occurred year round, but the 9–15 cm group was more abundant from January to June. At both sites, groupers >30 cm could hardly be found. Both grouper habitats experienced wide ranges of water temperature, salinity, and dissolved oxygen during the year.
  • Book chapter

    Water quality in Imbang river, Negros Occidental: effluents and pollutant loads from agriculture, sugar mills, households, and shrimp farms 

    GA Gonzales, HJ Gonzales, RC Sanares & ET Taberna - In TU Bagarinao (Ed.), Research Output of the Fisheries Sector Program, 2007 - Bureau of Agricultural Research, Department of Agriculture
    An ecological assessment of Imbang River in Negros Occidental was undertaken from December 1992 to February 1995. The effluents from sugar mills, households, shrimp farms, sugarcane plantations and rice fields were characterized and their pollutant loads estimated. Water quality and invertebrate assemblages were analyzed at several sites along the river to determine the environmental status. Results showed significant seasonal and site variations in water quality along Imbang River. The dry season, coinciding with the milling season, was the more critical time of the year as water quality tended to deteriorate. The segments of the river near the sugar mills and households had the poorest water quality. Sugar mill effluents had high water temperature (average 33oC but as high as 50oC), low dissolved oxygen, high total solids, the highest settleable solids (average 2.5 and as high as 17 m/l), and the highest biochemical oxygen demand (average 259 ppm but as high as 14,800 ppm BOD). Domestic effluents had low pH, high ammonia, very high BOD, plus detergents or surfactants and high levels of fecal coliform bacteria. Agricultural runoff had high nitrate, high total solids, and the highest total suspended solids (average 296 ppm but as high as 5,095 ppm TSS). Shrimp ponds used saline water of average 23 ppt, and had the highest total solids (average 23,456 ppm and as high as 57,400 ppm). By far the major contributor of pollutant loads into Imbang River was agriculture, due to its huge areal extent and huge volume of water use and run-off. Agricultural run-off carried the highest annual loads of 7,858 kg phosphate; 6,495 kg ammonia; 794 kg nitrite; 67,212 kg nitrate; 16,987 metric tons settleable solids; 16,800,000 mt total solids, and 11,890,000 mt total suspended solids; but only 297 mt BOD. Sugar mill effluents had the highest BOD load (1,583 mt/yr) and also had high nutrient loads. Household effluents contributed the second largest loads of solids next to agriculture, and also added surfactants (966 kg/yr) and fecal coliforms into the river. The six shrimp farms at the lower reaches of Imbang River were a minor contributor of pollutants into the river, annually adding about 891 kg ammonia; 1,077 kg phosphate; and 181,325 mt total solids.
  • Book chapter

    Changes in the fish diversity and abundance on a heavily fished fringing reef on Santiago Island, Pangasinan, Philippines 

    JW McManus, CL Nañola Jr., RB Reyes Jr. & KN Kesner - In TU Bagarinao (Ed.), Research Output of the Fisheries Sector Program, 2007 - Bureau of Agricultural Research, Department of Agriculture
    Fish assemblages on the reef slope, reef flat, and seagrass beds on Santiago Island were sampled over 18 months in 1992-1993 as part of a 6-year reef monitoring project started in 1986. Abundance and species diversity were analyzed by a variety of indices, and by multi-dimensional scaling and correlated ordered similarity matrix. The monitoring showed a distinct shift in the reef slope fish composition during the first half of 1988. Of the 100 most abundant species, 21 species showed significant reductions in abundance, and 20 species showed significant increases. Differences were not due to depth preference or feeding habits. Fishing pressure was apparently responsible for declines in Cheilinus trilobatus, Acanthurus nigricauda, and Naso literatus, as well as a general decline in the family Acanthuridae (surgeonfishes). However, analysis of site preferences of the decreasing species and the increasing species indicated a shift in community composition from those species preferring more coral cover to those preferring more sand, rock, and possibly Sargassum seaweed. Site preferences were determined from benthic life form transects done in 1992. Of 35 significantly changing species for which habitat data was obtained, 24 fit the hypothesis of habitat change. This supports the proposition from previous studies that the major cause of change in the reef slope fish community was the destructive fishing activity associated with Malthusian overfishing. Similar analyses of the fish assemblages on the reef flat and on the seagrass beds showed seasonal effects, particularly in the latter, but no strong shift comparable to that of the reef slope. These latter areas had been subjected to greater fishing pressure for a longer period.

    Reef fish populations such as those in Bolinao tend to be highly resilient provided the larval supply is not adversely affected. However, subtle changes in the cover of coral on a reef can lead to major changes in the composition of the fish community. Coral cover is being widely diminished on Philippine reefs, and substantial changes in the fish communities may be anticipated, even on reefs with initially low coral cover. These changes may affect the utility and immediate value of the fish to local fishers and the market systems they supply. It is of great urgency to stop destructive fishing practices such as blasting and use of cyanide, and to develop anchoring methods that are minimally destructive.

    There is a strong predictive relation between the numbers of fish (abundance) in an area and the numbers of species (biodiversity) they include. As fish populations decline due to destructive fishing, or highly concentrated non-destructive fishing, the local species richness may be expected to decline. This decline may have serious short-term social and economic consequences, as well as far-reaching long-term environmental effects. Efforts to reduce overfishing must be intensified—though reduction of birth rate, provision of alternative livelihoods, and curbing of destructive fishing — in order to prevent a very distressing future for the Philippine marine environment and the people it supports.
  • Book chapter

    Sugar mill effluents and water quality in Imbang River and Malisbog River, Negros Occidental 

    HJ Gonzales - In T Bagarinao (Ed.), Research Output of the Fisheries Sector Program, 2007 - Bureau of Agricultural Research, Department of Agriculture
    The effluents of two sugar mills and the effects on water quality in the receiving rivers were studied. Sugar mill A was located in Barangay Dos Hermanas in Talisay and discharged directly into Imbang River. Sugar Mill B was located in Barangay Hawaiian in Silay City and discharged into Malisbog River, a tributary of Imbang. Both sugar mills had sedimentation tanks and lagoons for partial wastewater treatment prior to discharge. Water sampling was done at 13 stations at effluent discharge sites and also upstream and downstream of these sites. The sugar mill effluents were particularly high in biochemical oxygen demand (BOD 109–419 mg/l), total suspended solids (168–384 mg/l), and total solids (1,185–1,234 mg/l), also high in ammonia (0.2–0.5 mg/l) and water temperature (31–38°C), but low in dissolved oxygen (2–5 mg/l). Measured stream flows varied at the different stations and were generally lowest at stations near sugar mill A and at stations near sugar mill B. At these sites, the depth of Imbang River varied from about 10 cm during low water flow in December–May to about 2 m during high water flow in June–November. During normal low flows, the sugar mill effluent comprised 75–85% of the total stream volume, causing highly polluted conditions immediately below the outlets. Sugar mill A discharged high annual loads of solids, BOD, nitrate, and phosphate into Imbang River, whereas sugar mill B loaded plenty of solids, BOD, ammonia, and phosphate into Malisbog River. The sugar cane milling season in Negros Occidental started in October and ended in May, coincident with the dry season. Significantly higher levels of BOD and nutrients, but lower DO, were observed in the river during the milling season (see figures in Gonzales et al., this volume), both because of greater discharge and lower dilution by lower stream flows. River water quality was better at the stations upstream than downstream of the sugar mills. Stations near the sugar mills had BOD, ammonia, and solids at concentrations exceeding the allowable limits set for river water by the Department of Environment and Natural Resources.
  • Book chapter

    The tuna fishery off northwestern Luzon: catch of purse seines and hand lines operating around fish-aggregating 'payaw' 

    VV Prado - In TU Bagarinao (Ed.), Research Output of the Fisheries Sector Program, 2007 - Bureau of Agricultural Research, Department of Agriculture
    The tuna fishery along northwestern Luzon was studied from March 1994 to April 1995. About 120 units of fish aggregating ‘payaw’ were set 20–100 km offshore and fished by about 350 handline boats and 6 purse seines. The handline landing areas were in Apatot, San Esteban, Ilocos Sur and in Darigayos Cove, La Union. The resident purse seine was based at Poro Point in San Fernando, La Union; the others were occasional operators. Skipjack tuna Katsuwonus pelamis was the primary species landed by the purse seine and yellowfin tuna Thunnus albacares was mostly landed by the hand lines. These species occurred year-round with peaks during the dry season. The purse seine was operated about 9 sets per month, and landed an average of 51 mt fish monthly (catch rate 5.7 mt/set), highest in November, December and March. Handline fishing was carried out an average of 17 days a month (catch rate about 19 kg/boat-day). The tuna fishery was adversely affected by strong monsoon winds and typhoons. The rough seas inhibit fishing and give the tuna populations much needed respite from the intense fishing pressure.
  • Book chapter

    Collection of the mud crab Scylla serrata var paramamosain in Tinagong Dagat and Sapian Bay, northern Panay 

    NB Solis - In T Bagarinao (Ed.), Research Output of the Fisheries Sector Program, 2007 - Bureau of Agricultural Research, Department of Agriculture
    Mud crabs were collected by baited traps from the mangroves and estuaries of Tinagong Dagat Bay and Sapian Bay in Capiz, northern Panay monthly over 18 months. Scylla serrata var paramamosain made up 95.4% of the collection and Scylla oceanica, 4.6%. Mean catch rates of S. serrata from Tinagong Dagat was 0.4 crabs/trap in the mangroves and 0.5 crabs/trap in the estuary; in Sapian Bay, 0.9 crabs/trap in both habitats. In both bays, S. serrata occurred year round, but at greater abundance during the rainy season (June–September). Most crabs were 2–10 cm in carapace width, but some were up to 14 cm. Crabs were smaller in the mangroves (modal size 5 cm) than in the estuary (modal size 8 cm). The smallest crabs (2 cm) were collected in the mangroves in January and May, and the 3 cm crabs occurred most months except June, August, September, and November. The presence of smaller crabs in greater numbers in the mangroves indicates affinity for shallow, sediment-laden habitat with plenty of shelters in the form of mangrove roots and leaves. Very few crabs over 8 cm were captured in the mangroves. Crabs of 4–14 cm were captured in the estuaries, the 12–14 cm ones during July–October. The samples at each site formed several size groups every month, and ‗cohorts‘ could be discerned and followed over the next months. It was estimated that the 2–4 cm size group in January–May reached the size of 8–10 cm by October–November. Juvenile mud crabs apparently spent one year in the mangroves or estuaries. There were more males than females (1F:1.2M) in Tinagong Dagat, but the other way around (1M:1.3F) in Sapian Bay. Berried crabs of 14 cm were occasionally caught by filter net in Tinagong Dagat.
  • Book chapter

    Agricultural run-off and pollution in Imbang River, Negros Occidental 

    GA Gonzales - In T Bagarinao (Ed.), Research Output of the Fisheries Sector Program, 2007 - Bureau of Agricultural Research, Department of Agriculture
    This study determined the concentration of key pollutants carried by agricultural run-off from the drainage area of Imbang River, Negros Occidental over a two-year period. The quantities loaded into the river were estimated to assess the contribution of agriculture to the degradation of the river. Agricultural production in sugarcane and rice plantations in the area relied on chemicals to control pests and enhance production. Run-off from agricultural land contained an average 0.2 ppm phosphate, 0.2 ppm ammonia, 0.02 ppm nitrite, and 1.7 ppm nitrate from fertilizer inputs and other sources. The run-off also had 7.4 ppm biochemical oxygen demand, 465 ppm total solids, 296 ppm total suspended solids, 0.4 ppm settleable solids, plus traces of organochlorine pesticides. The concentrations of all these potential pollutants were not alarming or dangerous, although on occasion, some exceeded the tolerable limits. However, increasing reliance on fertilizers often leads to intensified use and related problems. Likewise, the continuing use of chemicals to control field pests is of serious concern given that residues are easily carried by run-off to the nearest waterway and passed on and magnified through the food chain. The health of farm workers who routinely handle these products is at risk. Apart from commercial fertilizers, farm lands received organic wastes from domestic and industrial sources. Most farmers maintained farm animals such as carabaos, goats, and sheep that were allowed to graze on the fields after crops had been harvested. Grazing animals frequently left surface deposits of manure. Some farmers on occasion used sugar mill wastes as fertilizers and road fillers in the haciendas. Moreover, household wastes including human excreta were commonly disposed on nearby fields. The contributions of animal and human wastes to the total load of nutrients could be substantial but difficult to quantify given the manner of production and the varying composition of the wastes. Indeed, agricultural run-off transports non-point pollutants from so many poorly defined sources.