Proceedings of the Seminar-Workshop on Aquaculture Development in Southeast Asia, Iloilo City, Philippines, 26-28 July, 1994.

Documents the presentations at ADSEA '94, the 3rd Seminar-Workshop on Aquaculture Development in Southeast Asia. ADSEA '94 included reviews of the status of aquaculture development in SE Asia and Japan and of the research conducted by AQD to contribute to this development. There were also topics on responsible aquaculture, mollusc and seaweed culture, integrated farming, shrimp culture, diseases, and health management, and transgenic fish.

The volume also lists the research areas of 20 or so commodities prioritized for research at AQD for 1995-1997. Research programs are now directed to the generation of technologies that are economically feasible, environment-friendly, and socially equitable.

The volume is co-published by JICA and CIDA.

Recent Submissions

  • Conference paper

    Coastal aquaculture in Thailand 

    S Sahavacharin - In TU Bagarinao & EEC Flores (Eds.), Towards sustainable aquaculture in Southeast Asia and Japan: Proceedings of the Seminar-Workshop on Aquaculture Development in Southeast Asia, Iloilo City, Philippines, 26-28 July, 1994, 1995 - SEAFDEC Aquaculture Department
    Coastal aquaculture in Thailand has expanded rapidly in both area and production in the last decade. The important cultured species are the shrimps (Penaeus monodon and P. merguiensis), sea bass Lates calcarifer, groupers Epinephelus malabaricus and E. tauvina, green mussel Perna viridis, horse mussel Modiolus senhausenii, blood cockles Anadara granosa and A. nodifera and the oysters Crassostrea belcheri, C. lugubris and Saccostrea commercialis. The total production from coastal aquaculture in 1991 was 230,444 tons, consisting of 70.3% shrimp, 28.8% mollusks, and 0.9% fishes. The seaweeds Gracilaria spp., pearl oysters, scallops, and abalones are cultured on a pilot scale in some places. Hatchery technologies have recently been developed for groupers, oysters, scallops, and abalones. Expanded aquaculture has had some adverse effects on the environment and has also suffered from the environmental changes and conflicts due to other sectors using the same water and other resources.
  • Conference paper

    Shrimp culture and the environment 

    MJ Phillips - In TU Bagarinao & EEC Flores (Eds.), Towards sustainable aquaculture in Southeast Asia and Japan: Proceedings of the Seminar-Workshop on Aquaculture Development in Southeast Asia, Iloilo City, Philippines, 26-28 July, 1994, 1995 - SEAFDEC Aquaculture Department
    This paper reviews the interactions between shrimp culture and the natural environment. It considers and gives details of the effects of shrimp culture on the environment and the effects of environmental change on shrimp culture. Examples are given where the environmental impacts on and of shrimp culture have caused serious economic losses to shrimp farmers. The paper concludes that economic sustainability is and will continue to be closely related to how the shrimp farming industry deals with environmental problems. Strategies are considered for improved environmental management of shrimp aquaculture, and priorities are highlighted for future research on the relations between shrimp culture and the environment.
  • Conference paper

    Research on marine and freshwater fishes 

    AC Emata - In TU Bagarinao & EEC Flores (Eds.), Towards sustainable aquaculture in Southeast Asia and Japan: Proceedings of the Seminar-Workshop on Aquaculture Development in Southeast Asia, Iloilo City, Philippines, 26-28 July, 1994, 1995 - SEAFDEC Aquaculture Department
    Most of the fish research at SEAFDEC AQD in 1992-1994 was on milkfish. Studies were conducted on year-round spawning through hormonal or environmental manipulation; optimum lipid and protein levels and ration size for captive broodstock; and the influence of spawner age on reproductive performance. The economics of hatchery operations, alone or integrated with broodstock as a commercial enterprise, was assessed. Mass production of larvae was refined with the use of commercial or SEAFDEC-formulated larval diets. Alternative rearing schemes in large tanks and ponds were tried. Hatcheryproduced and wild-caught larvae were compared in terms of growth and production in experimental nursery and grow-out ponds. Supplemental diets for brackishwater grow-out culture were formulated.

    Studies on broodstock management of grouper Epinephelus spp. included lipid enrichment of the diet and hormonal induction of sex inversion. Seed production techniques were developed but survival rates were low. Grouper culture was found economically feasible in experimental ponds with 'trash' fish as feed.

    The mangrove red snapper Lutjanus argentimaculatus was successfully induced to spawn with injection of human chorionic gonadotropin. Initial larval rearing trials were successful but survival rates must be improved.

    Hormonal manipulation of spawning of the Asian sea bass Lates calcarifer allows seed production during most of the year. Photoperiod manipulation leads to maturation of females, but not males, beyond the natural breeding season (April-November). Nursery rearing of 9 mm juveniles is feasible in floating net cages with night lights that attract food zooplankton. The requirements of sea bass for lipid, protein, carbohydrates, and essential amino acids were determined.

    In the rabbitfish Siganus guttatus, weekly injections of luteinizing hormone releasing hormone analogue (LHRHa) sustains milt production for three weeks. Thyroid hormones injected into broodstocks improved the growth of larvae to day 7.

    Induced spawning techniques for the Asian catfish Clarias macrocephalus were refined by determining the seasonal responsiveness to LHRHa and pimozide injections and testing for pheromonal induction of spontaneous spawning. The optimum insemination rate was determined and egg hatchability was enhanced by removal of the adhesive coat before incubation. Several practical diets for catfish during grow-out culture were tested against 'trash' fish.

    The broodstock management for bighead carp Aristichthys nobilis was studied. Cage-reared juveniles from cage-reared broodstock showed the best growth. To improve the reproductive performance, the broodstock diets were supplemented with vitamins A, C, and E.

    Research on tilapias focused on genetics and strain selection. Several strain testing procedures for Nile tilapia were evaluated in their efficiency to detect economically important strain differences. Reference lines were developed from two existing red tilapia strains to measure and reduce the effects of uncontrolled nongenetic variables in strain evaluation experiments with Nile tilapia. The tolerance of two Nile tilapia strains to heavy metals was similar when gauged by the 24-hour and 96-hour lethal concentration and by fish growth, survival, and reproductive performance. In a separate study, four strains of red tilapia showed generally higher seed production when reared in tanks than in cages. Improvements in the feed and feeding management for Nile tilapia were also studied.

    Intensive tilapia farming and feeding have led to oxygen depletion and fish kills in Sampaloc Lake. To rehabilitate the lake, it is imperative to reduce the farming area from 30 to 6 hectares; stop the use of commercial feeds; and remove the water hyacinths and other debris. Fish kills in Laguna de Bay have also become serious in recent years, and a review of the occurrences, losses, and possible causes is currently being conducted. Studies on the epizootic ulcerative syndrome of snakeheads in Laguna de Bay have yet to pinpoint the pathogen. Skin lesions in tilapias in several ponds and lakes in the country were found to be due to bacteria.
  • Conference paper

    Training and information dissemination at SEAFDEC AQD 

    CT Villegas - In TU Bagarinao & EEC Flores (Eds.), Towards sustainable aquaculture in Southeast Asia and Japan: Proceedings of the Seminar-Workshop on Aquaculture Development in Southeast Asia, Iloilo City, Philippines, 26-28 July, 1994, 1995 - SEAFDEC Aquaculture Department
    The SEAFDEC Aquaculture Department (AQD) is mandated to develop human resources and to disseminate and exchange information for aquaculture development in the region. In 1991-1994, a total of 294 participants attended 23 sessions of nine training courses. Many others participated in AQD's student practicum, internships, and summer work programs. AQD conducted seminarworkshops on aquaculture development in southeast Asia, fish breeding, feeds and feeding, and training needs. Information materials (newsletters, a monograph, two extension manuals, leaflets, and videos) were produced based on research at AQD. To assist fishfarmers and other sectors of the local aquaculture industry, AQD conducted on-site or outreach seminars, and provided resource persons during fairs and exhibits, seminars, and consultative meetings. The AQD Library is open to all users; in addition to the collection of printed materials, a CD-ROM reader is now available for fast retrieval of bibliographic information from computerized databases like ASFA.
  • Conference paper

    Recent developments in aquaculture in Japan 

    K Fukusho - In TU Bagarinao & EEC Flores (Eds.), Towards sustainable aquaculture in Southeast Asia and Japan: Proceedings of the Seminar-Workshop on Aquaculture Development in Southeast Asia, Iloilo City, Philippines, 26-28 July, 1994, 1995 - SEAFDEC Aquaculture Department
    Aquaculture production in Japan in 1993 was 1,351,000 tons, 15.6% of the total fisheries production. About 93.6% came from mariculture and 6.4% from freshwater aquaculture. The per cent contribution of aquaculture to total production has increased in recent years but partly because marine fisheries,especially of sardine and pollack, have decreased. Aquaculture has reached a plateau, and decreased slightly between 1992 and 1993. Diverse marine and freshwater species are cultured in Japan — various fishes, crustaceans, mollusks, seaweeds, sea squirt, sea urchin, and others. Research and development in mariculture focus on finding substitutes for animal protein in feeds, improvement of fish quality, protection of the culture environment, use of offshore floating culture systems, and protection from diseases. Research in freshwater aquaculture has expanded to include recreational fishing, the propagation and preservation of endangered species, and the construction of fish ladders for salmonids and other migratory species.
  • Book | Conference publication

    Towards sustainable aquaculture in Southeast Asia and Japan : proceedings of the Seminar-Workshop on Aquaculture Development in Southeast Asia, Iloilo City, Philippines, 26-28 July 1994 

    TU Bagarinao & EEC Flores (Eds.) - 1995 - SEAFDEC Aquaculture Department
    Documents the presentations at ADSEA '94, the 3rd Seminar-Workshop on Aquaculture Development in Southeast Asia. ADSEA '94 includes reviews of the status of aquaculture development in Southeast Asia and Japan and of the researches conducted by Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center, Aquaculture Department (SEAFDEC/AQD) to contribute to this development. Topics on responsible aquaculture, mollusc and seaweed culture, integrated farming, shrimp culture, diseases, and health management, and transgenic fish were also discussed. It also lists the research areas of 20 or so commodities prioritized for research at AQD for 1995-1997.
  • Conference paper

    Research on crustaceans 

    FD Parado-Estepa - In TU Bagarinao & EEC Flores (Eds.), Towards sustainable aquaculture in Southeast Asia and Japan: Proceedings of the Seminar-Workshop on Aquaculture Development in Southeast Asia, Iloilo City, Philippines, 26-28 July, 1994, 1995 - SEAFDEC Aquaculture Department
    Crustacean research at the SEAFDEC Aquaculture Department during the last three years focused mostly on the tiger shrimp Penaeus monodon. Studies were done along six problem areas: (1) developing spawning techniques for captive broodstock, (2) defining physico-chemical levels tolerable by larvae or postlarvae, (3) finding alternative feeds or fertilizers for extensive culture, (4) reducing the cost and evaluating the quality of formulated feeds for semiintensive culture, (5) preventing and controlling disease, and (6) documenting the chemicals used in shrimp culture and their effects on the environment. To reduce feed costs, substitutes for expensive feed components were screened and the specific nutrient requirements of tiger shrimp during culture were determined. A few studies were made on other crustaceans. The vitellogenin levels during maturation of the white shrimp P. indicus were measured. The digestibility of feedstuffs was also tested in the white shrimp. Culture techniques are being developed for the mudcrab Scylla serrata in ponds, pens, and cages.
  • Conference paper

    Brackishwater integrated farming systems in Southeast Asia 

    CR De la Cruz - In TU Bagarinao & EEC Flores (Eds.), Towards sustainable aquaculture in Southeast Asia and Japan: Proceedings of the Seminar-Workshop on Aquaculture Development in Southeast Asia, Iloilo City, Philippines, 26-28 July, 1994, 1995 - SEAFDEC Aquaculture Department
    Integrated aquaculture-agriculture systems are more common in fresh water than in brackish water. Nevertheless, southeast Asian countries already have considerable research and experience in brackishwater integrated farming systems. In the Philippines, the effects of animal wastes on water quality and production of fish have been studied: chicken wastes on the mixed culture of milkfish Chanos chanos, tilapia Oreochromis niloticus, and shrimp Penaeus indicus; chicken and cattle manures on P. monodon and Artemia; and swine wastes on tilapia O. mossambicus. In Indonesia, about 60 hectares of fish farms have crops (pumpkin, spinach, cassava, maize, and chili) or livestock (cattle, goat, sheep, chicken, and duck) grown on the dikes of milkfish ponds. In Vietnam, culture of the giant prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii, Scylla serrata and marine shrimps has been integrated with coastal rice farming. Aquaculture-silviculture is a flourishing venture in Vietnam and Indonesia and gaining ground with experimental sites in Thailand and the Philippines. The seaweed Gracilaria has been cultured with fishes and shrimps in Taiwan, Vietnam, Thailand, and the Philippines. The production of Artemia cysts and biomass has been integrated with salt-making and fish or shrimp farming in the Philippines and Thailand. Production inputs and outputs from these integrated farming systems vary widely and socioeconomic information is nil. It is imperative to conduct follow-up research and evaluation of each system in terms of production and socioeconomics.
  • Conference paper

    Research on seaweeds and mollusks 

    AQ Hurtado-Ponce - In TU Bagarinao & EEC Flores (Eds.), Towards sustainable aquaculture in Southeast Asia and Japan: Proceedings of the Seminar-Workshop on Aquaculture Development in Southeast Asia, Iloilo City, Philippines, 26-28 July, 1994, 1995 - SEAFDEC Aquaculture Department
    Research on seaweeds focused on the carrageenan-producing Kappaphycus alvarezii and the agar-producing Gracilaria spp. Growth of K. alvarezii was better on horizontal lines than on vertical or cluster lines from bamboo rafts. All morphotypes (brown green, and red) grew faster at 50 cm than at 100 cm below the water surface, but the green morphotype showed better carrageenan properties. A socioeconomic survey of K. alvarezii farming in Panagatan Cays, Antique revealed that a farmer has an average annual production of 3 tons/ha (dry) with the fixed bottom and hanging longline methods.

    Three species of Gracilaria in natural beds in lloilo showed monthly variations in biomass and agar quality; G. heteroclada had the highest biomass and gel strength. When this species was grown in tanks, growth and agar sulfate content were influenced by the interaction of light, salinity, and nutrients. Enriched and unenriched stocks of G. heteroclada differed in agar quality. When G. heteroclada was grown with the tiger shrimp Penaeus monodon in extensive ponds, the highest growth rate and production were obtained at the seaweed stocking density of 250 g/m2; this was in November when average water temperature, transparency, and salinity were low. Salinity tolerance varies among Gracilaria species.Oyster (Crassostrea iredalei) and mussel (Perna viridis) farming in Western Visayas were assessed in 1992 in terms of the culture methods, socioeconomics, marketing, and profitability. A more localized survey of oyster and mussel fanning was conducted through rapid rural appraisal in two coastal towns in 1993. A farmer-participatory study followed in 1994 for the culture of oysters, mussels, seaweeds, and rabbitfishes in a river mouth in Dumangas, lloilo. Green mussel, brown mussel (Modiolus metcalfei), and seaweeds transplanted to Dumangas from Capiz have reproduced. In another study, the green mussel was tested as a biological filter in tiger shrimp ponds; shrimps stocked with mussels grew better than those without.

    A nationwide survey on the Placuna placenta fishery in 1993 showed 27 remaining 'kapis' beds; many others have been depleted due to excessive gathering, pollution, siltation, and trawling. Broodstocks are being developed to produce 'kapis' seed for grow-out and restocking. For the first time at AQD, adult donkey-ear abalone Haliotis asinina from the wild spawned naturally in laboratory tanks.

    Juvenile abalones can be successfully grown on Gracilaria or abalone diet.
  • Conference paper

    Recommendations for responsible aquaculture 

    I Csavas - In TU Bagarinao & EEC Flores (Eds.), Towards sustainable aquaculture in Southeast Asia and Japan: Proceedings of the Seminar-Workshop on Aquaculture Development in Southeast Asia, Iloilo City, Philippines, 26-28 July, 1994, 1995 - SEAFDEC Aquaculture Department
    Aquaculture has grown rapidly in Asia. In 1992, out of the 52.8 million tons of total production of aquatic organisms, as much as 17 million tons (32.2%) came from aquaculture. However, unplanned and uncontrolled development of aquaculture has led occasionally to environmental damage and social disruption in many countries. Now attention has focused on the sustainability of aquaculture. Negative impacts of shrimp culture have been well publicized, but problems have also been caused by overinvestments in fish and mollusk culture. As sustainability is a highly complex issue, it is important to develop internationally accepted principles and guidelines for responsible aquaculture, with the use of technologies not detrimental to natural resources, ecosystems and human communities. FAO is now in the process of developing an International Code of Conduct for Responsible Fishing based on the Declaration of Cancun. One chapter of the Code will deal with aquaculture. Unfortunately, information is rather scanty on the environmental impacts of various aquaculture systems and the carrying capacity of aquatic ecosystems, especially in tropical areas. Therefore, research on these topics should receive high priority. Similarly, tightening and enforcing the rules and regulationsgoverning existing and new aquaculture ventures is a pressing task that responsible government agencies can not postpone any longer.
  • Conference paper

    The SEAFDEC Aquaculture Department at 21: R&D for sustainable aquaculture 

    EEC Flores & TU Bagarinao - In TU Bagarinao & EEC Flores (Eds.), Towards sustainable aquaculture in Southeast Asia and Japan: Proceedings of the Seminar-Workshop on Aquaculture Development in Southeast Asia, Iloilo City, Philippines, 26-28 July, 1994, 1995 - SEAFDEC Aquaculture Department
    This paper reviews the research output of the SEAFDEC Aquaculture Department (AQD) over the past 21 years of its existence. These realized studies are compared with the priority problem areas recommended for research by international or regional seminar-workshops convened by AQD in 1983, 1987, 1991 and 1994. Between 1976 and 1994, AQD researchers produced 554 publications, including 274 in journals indexed by the Institute for Scientific Information, 122 in other journals, and 158 in conference proceedings. Another 82 publications from work done outside AQD were authored or co-authored by AQD researchers, mostly during their graduate programs. In addition, AQD published 21 extension manuals and 14 technical reports and monographs by AQD researchers, and co-published two other monographs by non-AQD researchers. AQD's major contributions have been the technologies for tiger shrimp seed production, grow-out culture, feeds, and disease control; milkfish seed production and feeds; rabbitfish seed production; and tilapia feeds and strain selection. Communication and two-way feedback among AQD researchers and representatives of the aquaculture industry and the SEAFDEC Member Countries must be improved to fine-tune AQD research. In the late 1980s, AQD started redirecting some of its research towards environmental problems in aquaculture. Much of the near future will be spent implementing research imperatives in sustainable and responsible aquaculture.
  • Conference paper

    Coastal fisheries and mollusk and seaweed culture in Southeast Asia: Integrated planning and precautions 

    JW McManus - In TU Bagarinao & EEC Flores (Eds.), Towards sustainable aquaculture in Southeast Asia and Japan: Proceedings of the Seminar-Workshop on Aquaculture Development in Southeast Asia, Iloilo City, Philippines, 26-28 July, 1994, 1995 - SEAFDEC Aquaculture Department
    Capture fisheries in Southeast Asia are characterized by rampant overfishing, made worse in many areas by problems of overpopulation and by inappropriate management strategies based on misconceptions about tropical fisheries. Mollusk culture and seaweed culture are frequently cited as means to alleviate fishing pressure and to provide substitute protein. There is great potential for expansion of these types of mariculture in terms of area used, species employed, and products generated. However, large-scale mariculture rarely provides significant employment, and the provision of low-cost protein in markets does not alleviate poverty in countries where food production is the primary means of employment. In cases where conflicts have arisen between mariculture development and ecosystem maintenance, mariculture has been favored by inappropriate economic valuations. Small-scale mariculture designed to provide alternative livelihood for fishers is worth developing, although limited by larval supplies and suitable farming areas. Mariculture should be approached as a species-diverse, small-scale enterprise within the framework of integrated coastal management.
  • Conference paper

    Aquaculture in Vietnam 

    XL Nguyen - In TU Bagarinao & EEC Flores (Eds.), Towards sustainable aquaculture in Southeast Asia and Japan: Proceedings of the Seminar-Workshop on Aquaculture Development in Southeast Asia, Iloilo City, Philippines, 26-28 July, 1994, 1995 - SEAFDEC Aquaculture Department
    Aquaculture in Vietnam has gained momentum and now produces 370,000 tons of various aquatic commodities. Aquaculture includes shrimp culture in the Mekong Delta; fish culture in cages in rivers, reservoirs, and coastal waters; fish culture in ponds and lakes; mollusk culture in the northern provinces, culture of soft-shell turtle in some provinces, culture of the seaweed Gracilaria. In north and central Vietnam, aquaculture has increased the protein supply, the foreign exchange earnings, employment opportunities, and the living conditions of the people. Vietnam aims to develop aquaculture to produce more than 600,000 tons of aquatic products by the year 2000.
  • Conference paper

    Community fishery resources management in Malalison Island, Philippines 

    RF Agbayani - In TU Bagarinao & EEC Flores (Eds.), Towards sustainable aquaculture in Southeast Asia and Japan: Proceedings of the Seminar-Workshop on Aquaculture Development in Southeast Asia, Iloilo City, Philippines, 26-28 July, 1994, 1995 - SEAFDEC Aquaculture Department
    The Community Fishery Resources Management Project, launched in 1991 in Malalison Island, Philippines is a development-oriented research project integrating biology, economics, sociology, engineering, and public administration. The general objective is to support, and learn from, the collaboration of people's organization, biologists, and social scientists in applying community-based techniques in fishery management. During Phase I, the Project concentrated on community organizing, institution building, and the introduction of seaweed farming as alternative livelihood. Studies were made on the marine resources of the island, the traditional boundaries and territorial use rights, the economic utilization of resources in the island, and the cultivation techniques for seaweeds. Phase II started in 1994 with the implementation of the territorial use rights in fisheries and the test deployment of prototype concrete artificial reefs. Phase II includes impact assessment (environmental, social, and economic), institutional arrangements in fishery co-management, ethnographic studies, economics of Seafarming techniques, and management of fishery cooperatives.
  • Conference paper

    Aquaculture development and sustainability in Southeast Asia 

    MN Kutty - In TU Bagarinao & EEC Flores (Eds.), Towards sustainable aquaculture in Southeast Asia and Japan: Proceedings of the Seminar-Workshop on Aquaculture Development in Southeast Asia, Iloilo City, Philippines, 26-28 July, 1994, 1995 - SEAFDEC Aquaculture Department
    Countries in Southeast Asia still display a vivid spectrum of developmental stages in aquaculture, the most and the least developed seen in contiguous areas despite geographic similarities. The Network of Aquaculture Centres in Asia-Pacific is actively involved in the development of aquaculture in the region, approaching it from a holistic viewpoint by integrating issues in environment, resource management, and socioeconomics into its program of work. Constraints related to site, inputs, and markets have assumed more importance in many countries, but transfer of technology is still the problem in about half the region. More intense culture systems, especially shrimp pond and fish cages, have resulted in serious problems of self-pollution, which affects the industry's own sustainability. A recent FAO-NACA regional study indicated that non-aquaculture sectors such as industries, agriculture, urbanization, and tourism have serious impacts on aquaculture, but there is little evidence that aquaculture is seriously affecting non-aquaculture sectors. Sustainability of aquaculture has to be considered along with economic and environmental sustainability. It appears from examples in the region that aquaculture that seriously damages the environment is economically unsustainable. Various constraints that impinge on the sustainability of aquaculture in the region are discussed.
  • Conference paper

    Aquaculture in the Philippines 

    SM Aypa - In TU Bagarinao & EEC Flores (Eds.), Towards sustainable aquaculture in Southeast Asia and Japan: Proceedings of the Seminar-Workshop on Aquaculture Development in Southeast Asia, Iloilo City, Philippines, 26-28 July, 1994, 1995 - SEAFDEC Aquaculture Department
    Aquaculture is regarded as the most promising source of protein food in the years ahead. Milkfish and Nile tilapia are the major fishes now produced but groupers, sea bass, rabbitfish, red snappers, carps, and catfishes are grown by some farmers. The tiger shrimp is still the most important cultured crustacean, but white shrimps and mudcrabs also have great potential. Oysters and mussels are produced in considerable amounts. Mariculture of the seaweed Eucheuma is now a well established industry, and the pond culture of Gracilaria for agar extraction is beginning to take off.
  • Conference paper

    Aquaculture in Indonesia 

    D Yusuf - In TU Bagarinao & EEC Flores (Eds.), Towards sustainable aquaculture in Southeast Asia and Japan: Proceedings of the Seminar-Workshop on Aquaculture Development in Southeast Asia, Iloilo City, Philippines, 26-28 July, 1994, 1995 - SEAFDEC Aquaculture Department
    Indonesia has a long tradition in aquaculture, particularly in fresh water and brackish water. Most aquaculture is still in extensive systems with low productivity. Mariculture only started in the 1980s and contributes yet little to the total national production. Aquaculture has become increasingly important, particularly in supporting rural economies. The development of shrimp and prawn culture became a Government priority after trawl fishing was banned in 1980-81. With its strategic geographic position and enormous inland and coastal resources, Indonesia has good prospects in aquaculture.
  • Conference paper

    Recent trends in fish diseases in Japan 

    H Sako - In TU Bagarinao & EEC Flores (Eds.), Towards sustainable aquaculture in Southeast Asia and Japan: Proceedings of the Seminar-Workshop on Aquaculture Development in Southeast Asia, Iloilo City, Philippines, 26-28 July, 1994, 1995 - SEAFDEC Aquaculture Department
    Losses of cultured marine and freshwater fishes due to diseases averaged about 20,000 tons each year or 6% of the aquaculture production in Japan in 1980-1991. During this last decade, bacterial diseases have been responsible for most of the losses. Three trends are evident from epidemiological data. First, diseases caused by bacteria with multiple drug resistance are prevalent, and these are difficult to overcome by chemotherapy. Second, parasitic diseases and viral diseases that are practically impossible to cure are increasing. Third, some diseases seem to originate in juveniles (seed) imported from other countries. Further research should focus on: (1) improving dietary and environmental conditions, (2) giving the host animals resistance against disease through methods such as vaccination, and (3) developing diagnostic and disinfection procedures for epidemics. Active exchange of information is necessary to prevent, or alleviate the effects of, the spread of diseases through international export and import of juveniles.
  • Conference paper

    Aquaculture in Malaysia 

    IbA Kechik - In TU Bagarinao & EEC Flores (Eds.), Towards sustainable aquaculture in Southeast Asia and Japan: Proceedings of the Seminar-Workshop on Aquaculture Development in Southeast Asia, Iloilo City, Philippines, 26-28 July, 1994, 1995 - SEAFDEC Aquaculture Department
    Aquaculture in Malaysia is experiencing rapid growth. Total production in 1992 amounted to 79,699 tons valued at RM 207.4 million. These figures are 23% and 25% higher than the previous year's. Semi-culture of the cockle Anadara granosa was still predominant, contributing about 70% of the total output. Culture and production of the oyster Crassostrea iredalei is still insignificant. Sea bass Lates calcarifer constituted over 80% of the production from marine cages. Cage culture of grouper Epinephelus sp., snapper Lutjanus sp. and pompano Trachinotus blochii were also done in much smaller scale. The mangrove snapper Lutjanus argentimaculatus was recently spawned in captivity and larvae and juveniles were produced. In 1992, the tiger shrimp Penaeus monodon constituted about 87% of brackishwater pond production. Pond culture of the white shrimp P. merguiensis and the mudcrab Scylla sp. is at the experimental stage. Red tilapia hybrid was the major freshwater species cultured in cages, with 1,486 tons harvested in 1992. Freshwater pond production was valued at RM 100.85 million, 22% of which was due to the eel Anguilla japonica. Production of freshwater ornamental fishes is also becoming significant. Other exotic species recently bred and cultured are the African catfish Clarias gariepinus and the pacu Piaractus brachypomus. The indigenous freshwater catfish Mystus nemurus and carp Probarbus julleini have recently been bred in captivity and cultured experimentally. Lately, there have been attempts to culture non-conventional species such as the bullfrog Rana catesbeiana, the soft-shell turtle Trionyx sinensis, and aquatic ornamental plants.
  • Conference paper

    Health management in tropical aquaculture systems 

    M Shariff - In TU Bagarinao & EEC Flores (Eds.), Towards sustainable aquaculture in Southeast Asia and Japan: Proceedings of the Seminar-Workshop on Aquaculture Development in Southeast Asia, Iloilo City, Philippines, 26-28 July, 1994, 1995 - SEAFDEC Aquaculture Department
    Health management strategies are very important in aquaculture. In Asia, health management practices are broadly similar for the various aquatic species that are cultured. These focus mainly on maintaining the good health of the organisms throughout the life cycle. Good health management is based on an understanding of the interactions between the environment (water), the host, and the pathogens. In an ideal system, the three factors are balanced to offset a disease process. This balance is difficult to maintain in an intensive culture system and significant mortalities usually result. The outbreak of disease is thus related to poor health management. This paper deals with the health management practices applicable to the hatchery and grow-out stages of shrimp and fishes cultured in the tropics.

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