Recent Submissions

  • Conference paper

    Trading of juvenile crabs and grow-out culture in Capiz 

    GJ Panaguiton - In ET Quinitio, FD Parado-Estepa & RM Coloso (Eds.), Philippines : In the forefront of the mud crab industry development : proceedings of the 1st National Mud Crab Congress, 16-18 November 2015, Iloilo City, Philippines, 2017 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
    The article presents the trade of juvenile crabs in the Province of Capiz, Philippines. Moreover grow-out culture was also presented. Likewise, common problems encountered in the trade, and culture of the crabs was discussed.
  • Conference paper

    Overview of the mud crab industry in the Philippines 

    ET Quinitio - In ET Quinitio, FD Parado-Estepa & RM Coloso (Eds.), Philippines : In the forefront of the mud crab industry development : proceedings of the 1st National Mud Crab Congress, 16-18 November 2015, Iloilo City, Philippines, 2017 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
    Mud crab farming has long been established in the Philippines and the country is the second top producer in the world. Except for Scylla paramamosain, the three other species, S. serrata, S. tranquebarica and S. olivacea are commonly found in the country, but S. serrata is the preferred species for farming. Crab seeds for farming are mainly from the wild and in recent years, a small percentage from the hatchery. Due to the apparent decline of the wild crab stocks, provincial and municipal ordinances have been issued by a number of Local Government Units (LGUs) along with the Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources (BFAR) to conserve and manage the remaining resources. From the hatchery, megalopa or crab instars are grown in net cages installed in the nursery pond. Mud crab farming engages mostly in long-term grow-out culture of juvenile crabs to market size for 3-5 months, short-term fattening of lean crabs for 15-45 days, and recently, soft-shell crab production. Polyculture of juvenile crabs to market size with one to three other commodities in earthen brackishwater ponds is usually practiced. Mud crabs for soft-shell crab production are mainly from the wild, while SEAFDEC/AQD demonstrates the use of hatchery-produced juvenile mud crabs as seedstock.

    Refinement is continuously being done to improve the economic viability of producing crabs, although basic technologies have been developed for all phases of culture (hatchery, nursery, grow-out, fattening and soft shell crab production). The major issues facing the industry are the lack of seedstock, difficulty of zoea 5 to molt to megalopa stage, cannibalism particularly at the nursery phase, species identification at the juvenile stage, use of fish as aquafeed, diseases, effects of climate change and quality of crabs at postharvest. In 2012, the Philippine Council for Agriculture, Aquatic and Natural Resources Research and Development (PCAARRD) of the Department of Science and Technology (DOST) started funding projects under the National Mud Crab Science and Technology Program (NMCSTP) to address these issues. The major aim of the Program was to improve the production, profitability and sustainability of crab farming. SEAFDEC/AQD leads in capacity building with focus on the sustainability of the mud crab industry. Various collaborations and research studies on mud crab culture enabled SEAFDEC/AQD to package mud crab technologies, conduct local and international training courses and on-site technology demonstrations, and publish extension manuals and scientific publications since the mid1990s. Research and Development activities have been translated into improved production. With the recent developments and refinements of technologies, it is expected that the Philippines will increase its production by 25-50% in the next 5 years.
  • Conference paper

    Unified provincial fisheries law enforcement of ordinance of Camarines Norte focusing on mud crab 

    EA Estanislao - In ET Quinitio, FD Parado-Estepa & RM Coloso (Eds.), Philippines : In the forefront of the mud crab industry development : proceedings of the 1st National Mud Crab Congress, 16-18 November 2015, Iloilo City, Philippines, 2017 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
    Due to overfishing and widespread coastal habitat degradation, the Province of Camarines Norte passed a provincial fisheries law enforcement known as the Unified Provincial Fisheries Law Enforcement Ordinance of Camarines Norte (UPFLEON) (P.O. 50-10). Given emphasis in the paper is the banning in the collection and possession of less than 1.0 cm juvenile crabs.
  • Conference paper

    Nursery and grow-out feeding management of mud crab farmers in the Philippines: Santeh experience 

    JRA Gabiota - In ET Quinitio, FD Parado-Estepa & RM Coloso (Eds.), Philippines : In the forefront of the mud crab industry development : proceedings of the 1st National Mud Crab Congress, 16-18 November 2015, Iloilo City, Philippines, 2017 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
    Mud crab (Scylla serrata) farming has been one of the means of livelihood of many Filipino farmers in coastal areas, specifically in Southern Luzon and Visayas. Nursery and grow-out operations in these areas vary in terms of their feeding management and techniques for a better yield. Farmers in Bicol region, specifically Sorsogon which is one of the sources of wild crablets in the country, are presently using pelleted feeds for nursing different crab sizes. On the other hand, farmers in Quezon, Bataan, Masbate, Negros and Capiz are growing crabs to marketable size for domestic and export markets.

    It was noted that there are still farmers in some areas that use low value fish for feeding crabs resulting in the deterioration of the pond bottom and water environment. On the other hand, pelleted feeds serve as an alternative feed that addresses the problem of the declining supply of trash fish, corn, mussel and snails. The price of trash fish has increased significantly due to its unavailability in several areas. In addition, pollution of the water environment and fluctuations in the water parameters for crabs due to improper pond preparation, pollution and climate change have added stress to the crabs.
  • Book | Conference publication

    Philippines: In the forefront of the mud crab industry: Proceedings of the 1st National Mud Crab Congress 

    ET Quinitio, FD Parado-Estepa & RM Coloso (Eds.) - In ET Quinitio, FD Parado-Estepa & RM Coloso (Eds.), Philippines : In the forefront of the mud crab industry development : proceedings of the 1st National Mud Crab Congress, 16-18 November 2015, Iloilo City, Philippines, 2017 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
  • Conference paper

    Effect of feed binder on water stability and digestibility of formulated feed for the mud crab Scylla serrata 

    MR Catacutan - In ET Quinitio, FD Parado-Estepa & RM Coloso (Eds.), Philippines : In the forefront of the mud crab industry development : proceedings of the 1st National Mud Crab Congress, 16-18 November 2015, Iloilo City, Philippines, 2017 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
    The binding capacity of six natural and eight synthetic feed binders were tested in a basal diet formulated for the mud crab. Incorporation levels of natural binders ranged from 1 to 25% while those of synthetic binders ranged from 0.1 to 5% and these were tested for pellet stability in seawater by a) 10-min immersion, and b) at different time intervals. Pellets with synthetic binders were more water-stable than pellets with natural binders. Three synthetic binders and natural binders (glutinous rice starch and carrageenan + CMC) showed best results. The Apparent Digestibility Coefficients (ADC) of crude protein (ADCCP) and crude fat (ADCCFt) of the basal diet were determined when selected feed binders were included in the formulation. These were determined by using an inert indicator, chromic oxide. Results showed that the ADCCP and ADCCFt of the basal diet were not similar when different binders were used, and these differences ranged from 3 to 7%. Carrageenan combined with a synthetic binder improved ADCCP and CDCCFt values.
  • Conference paper

    Nursery culture of mud crab Scylla serrata using different feeding rates 

    VR Alava, JD Sumile & FD Parado-Estepa - In ET Quinitio, FD Parado-Estepa & RM Coloso (Eds.), Philippines : In the forefront of the mud crab industry development : proceedings of the 1st National Mud Crab Congress, 16-18 November 2015, Iloilo City, Philippines, 2017 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
    The effect of different feeding rates on the production and profitability of Phases 1 and 2 (3-week each) nursery culture of hatchery-produced crab Scylla serrata was determined. Minced mussel meat and formulated diet (at a ratio of 30:70) were fed to crabs. The crabs were stocked randomly in 12-m2 net cages installed in the nursery earthen pond at stocking densities of 50 m-2 for Phase 1 and 10 m-2 for Phase 2. Crabs were fed three times daily at 0830, 1300 and 1630h h. In Phase 1, feed conversion ratio (FCR) at a feeding rate of 100% of initial crab biomass day-1 for the entire three weeks was the lowest (p<0.05) while survival, body weight (BW), carapace width (CW) and carapace length (CL) were not different (p>0.05) among crabs given different feeding rates. For Phase 2, the feeding rate of 40-30-20% of crab biomass day-1 (week 1-2-3) resulted in lowest (p<0.05) FCR that was not significantly different from FCRs of crabs fed 50-40-30% and 60-50-40% of BW. Crab BW, CW and CL were not different (p>0.05) among feeding rate treatments. Profitability was better when feeding rate used was 100% of initial crab biomass day-1 for the entire Phase 1 or 100-50-40% of crab biomass day-1 (for week 1-2-3). A feeding rate of 50-40-30 % of crab biomass day-1 (week 1-2-3) was more profitable in Phase 2.
  • Conference paper

    Mangroves as mud crab habitats 

    JH Primavera - In ET Quinitio, FD Parado-Estepa & RM Coloso (Eds.), Philippines : In the forefront of the mud crab industry development : proceedings of the 1st National Mud Crab Congress, 16-18 November 2015, Iloilo City, Philippines, 2017 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
    The paper reports the use of mangroves by Scylla species both as wild and culture habitats. Based on published literature, natural mangrove crab populations are described in terms of population density, dispersal and movement within and outside mangroves, crab burrows and associated mangrove species. Strategies for Scylla conservation depend on the kind of mangrove habitat - (mangrove) restoration for open fringing mangroves where crab recruitment and abundance are determined by habitat availability vs stock enhancement in closed basin mangroves with restricted recruitment and limited movement of crabs.

    Mangrove crabs are also reared in monoculture in mangrove cages and pens, or in polyculture with milkfish in extensive ponds (where mangroves used to thrive). The paper describes a SEAFDEC Aquaculture Department study to evaluate the effects of mud crab net pen systems on mangrove macroflora, and the replacement of dietary trash fish with low-cost pellets. Results showed that incomplete, low-cost pellets can replace fish biomass requirement in mud crab diets, but that crab presence resulted in fewer mangrove seedlings and saplings. Economic analysis showed the viability of crab culture in mangrove pens using a combination of fish biomass and pellets to reduce the requirement for (low-value) fish, which is a food item of poor coastal communities.
  • Conference paper

    Mud crab fattening project of KAMAMANA in Del Carmen, Siargao Island 

    AE Sulima - In ET Quinitio, FD Parado-Estepa & RM Coloso (Eds.), Philippines : In the forefront of the mud crab industry development : proceedings of the 1st National Mud Crab Congress, 16-18 November 2015, Iloilo City, Philippines, 2017 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
    The Kaanib ng mga Mangingisda at Magsasaka ng Numancia Aqua-Agrikultura (KAMAMANA), established in Del Carmen, Siargao Island in 2011 is a People's Organization active in promoting the advocacy in 1) protecting the environment and natural resources, 2) providing services for the family welfare, and 3) managing sustainable livelihood programs and community development. One of the major livelihood programs presently being implemented by KAMAMANA is the fattening of mud crab (mangrove crab), Scylla serrata, in plastic containers set up in a mangrove area. Tenurial rights to manage a 2-hectare mangrove area for 25 years was granted to KAMAMANA by the Department of Environmental and Natural Resources.

    Crabs obtained from the mangrove areas of Del Carmen and nearby municipalities are purchased and stocked in plastic containers. The crabs are fed trash fish and mollusks once every afternoon to satiation until they are fattened, usually for 1-2 weeks. The major problem encountered is mortality after molting. Four KAMAMANA members are involved in the crab fattening. When mortalities occur, the dead crabs are usually charged to members assigned in the operation. The fattened crabs are sold to local restaurants, hotels, resorts and walk-in buyers or brought to traders in Surigao City. The net income is divided into the following: members involved in the culture (50%), treasurer (10%), business manager (15%), organizational share (5%), savings (5%) and trust fund (15%).
  • Conference paper

    Polyculture of mud crab in Region 3 

    M Bonifacio - In ET Quinitio, FD Parado-Estepa & RM Coloso (Eds.), Philippines : In the forefront of the mud crab industry development : proceedings of the 1st National Mud Crab Congress, 16-18 November 2015, Iloilo City, Philippines, 2017 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
    The polyculture of mud crab with one to three other species (milkfish (Chanos chanos), tilapia (Oreochromis spp.) and shrimp or sugpo (Penaeus monodon)) is a common practice in Region 3. Pond preparation is given importance prior to stocking of various species. Removal of sludge in the pond and application of probiotics are included in the standard pond preparation. The size and stocking densities of each species vary depending on the season. The volume of water to be replaced is based on the transparency of the water.

    The various species are fed natural food grown in the pond in addition to mollusks and low value fish given specifically for mud crab and shrimp. When pond water becomes transparent (indicating the decrease in phytoplankton density), the water is agitated using a small boat. If water continues to be transparent, fertilizers are applied to enhance growth of natural food. The pond water and animals are closely monitored to prevent diseases. Some of the early signs of occurrence of disease include the presence of bubbles on the water surface, and presence of weak shrimp on the feeding trays and along the dikes. The presence of weak shrimp and crab on the pond bottom and continuous swimming of these animals from night to dawn indicate poor pond water quality which can be remedied by circulating and flushing of the pond water every other day.
  • Conference paper

    Diseases affecting wild and farmed mud crab in the Philippines 

    EA Tendencia & MVC Cabilitasan - In ET Quinitio, FD Parado-Estepa & RM Coloso (Eds.), Philippines : In the forefront of the mud crab industry development : proceedings of the 1st National Mud Crab Congress, 16-18 November 2015, Iloilo City, Philippines, 2017 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
    Mortalities due to cannibalism and diseases have been reported as major problems in the grow-out phase of mud crab production. This study aimed to identify and describe diseases affecting farmed and wild mud crab (mangrove crab) including predisposing, risk and protective factors, and possible prevention and control measures. A total of 767 wild and farmed mud crab samples were collected. External examination showed abnormalities such as short abdominal flap, discoloration of the abdominal region, darker carapace, lesions on carapace, claws and legs, and presence of epibionts like algae and the barnacles Balanus sp. on the carapace. Internally, necrotic, black and brown gills, and discolored gonads were observed. Stalked barnacles, Octolasmis spp., were observed in the gills. White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) was detected in 14 samples sourced from farms and Infectious hypodermal and haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHHNV) in 2 wild samples. WSSV was implicated in mortality cases. Low temperature and presence of WSSV positive shrimp were identified as risk factors for WSSV infection or outbreak. Pathogenicity tests for some isolated bacteria suggested that these may cause mortality in mud crab under stressful conditions. To prevent mortality due to WSSV infection, it is recommended to avoid polyculture of mud crab with shrimp and/or other crustaceans.
  • Conference paper

    Capacity building initiatives of Winrock International on mud crab culture in the Caraga Region 

    J Nobillos, D Gudahl & J Orprecio - In ET Quinitio, FD Parado-Estepa & RM Coloso (Eds.), Philippines : In the forefront of the mud crab industry development : proceedings of the 1st National Mud Crab Congress, 16-18 November 2015, Iloilo City, Philippines, 2017 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
    The paper presents the output of the capacity building initiatives of Winrock International on Mud crab culture in the Caraga Region, Philippines. The capacity building seminar included lectures on the mud crab biology, pond preparation, nursery and grow-out culture, fattening, and soft-shell crab farming. Identification of the various crab body parts, actual pond preparation, nursery and grow-out culture of crab were demonstrated after the series of lectures.
  • Conference paper

    Mud crab production trials at the College of Fisheries and Marine Sciences, Aklan State University, New Washington, Aklan 

    YH Primavera-Tirol, R de la Cruz & EB Pastrana - In ET Quinitio, FD Parado-Estepa & RM Coloso (Eds.), Philippines : In the forefront of the mud crab industry development : proceedings of the 1st National Mud Crab Congress, 16-18 November 2015, Iloilo City, Philippines, 2017 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
    Two hatchery and nursery trials have been conducted at the College of Fisheries and Marine Sciences, Aklan State University (ASU) for the Multi-species Hatchery and Fishfarm Project from August to September 2014 and April to May 2015, in collaboration with the Aquaculture Department (AQD), Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center (SEAFDEC) under the National Mud Crab Science and Technology Program of the PCAARRD-DOST.

    Two ASU staff underwent training on Mud Crab Hatchery, Nursery and Grow-out Operations at SEAFDEC/AQD from September to October 2013. This was followed by SEAFDEC/AQD&rsquo;s provision of technical assistance during the actual hatchery and nursery operations using Scylla serrata at ASU. Survival rates of 3% and of 66-76% were recorded in the hatchery and nursery phases, respectively. The natural food consisting of rotifer and Artemia, and commercial formulated diet were fed to S. serrata larvae (zoea to megalopa). Juvenile crabs were fed formulated feeds and molluscs. Water temperature ranged from 27 to 30°C and salinity from 29 to 33 ppt in the hatchery. Initial results and insights are discussed and evaluated as guide for future hatchery and nursery protocols.
  • Conference paper

    Breeding and culture of the polychaete, Marphysa mossambica, as feed for the mud crab 

    VR Alava, JB Biñas & MAE Mandario - In ET Quinitio, FD Parado-Estepa & RM Coloso (Eds.), Philippines : In the forefront of the mud crab industry development : proceedings of the 1st National Mud Crab Congress, 16-18 November 2015, Iloilo City, Philippines, 2017 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
    Marine worms (Annelida: Polychaeta) are considered as important food for crustacean broodstock because they contain hormones and correct balance of essential nutrients for reproduction. Marphysa mossambica (Peters, 1854) occurs in muddy coastal areas and is abundant in fish farms where it builds burrows in nutrient-rich sediments. This species encapsulates their eggs and larvae in gelatinous masses (jelly cocoons). It is a multiple spawner, and breeders are repeatedly spawning in tanks. Culture techniques have also been developed and established in tanks. Based on dry weight, cultured M. mossambica contained 62-66% crude protein and 7-12% lipids with levels of highly unsaturated fatty acids (HUFAs) such as arachidonic (20:4n-6), eicosapentaenoic (20:5n-3) and docosahexaenoic acid (22:6n-3) at 0.2-0.5%, 0.2-0.3% and 0.3-0.5%, respectively. Stocks were monitored for the presence of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) using polymerase chain reaction-based diagnostic methods. The WSSV-free polychaetes mass-produced in tanks were utilized as live food for mud crab S. serrata broodstock. Mud crab broodstock fed natural food (mussel, fish, and squid) with live Marphysa on daily feed rotation produced higher number of crab zoeae, larval survival, total lipids and HUFAs than those fed natural food without live Marphysa. Production of nutrient-rich WSSV-free polychaetes in captivity can play a significant role in supporting crustacean hatcheries that supply seeds to the nursery and grow-out.
  • Conference paper

    Implication of mud crab culture technology transfer on rural coastal communities: The case in northern Samar, Philippines 

    DB Baticados, RF Agbayani & ET Quinitio - In ET Quinitio, FD Parado-Estepa & RM Coloso (Eds.), Philippines : In the forefront of the mud crab industry development : proceedings of the 1st National Mud Crab Congress, 16-18 November 2015, Iloilo City, Philippines, 2017 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
    The socio-economic implications of technology transfer of mud crab culture on small-scale growers in Northern Samar and the mechanism of nursery technology transfer were investigated. The study covered four Peoples Organizations (POs), each operating in villages of the four municipalities of Northern Samar namely, Lavezares, Rosario, Laoang, and Pambujan. These were sites of the Philippine-Australian Community Assistance Program - assisted mud crab (Scylla) culture livelihood projects. Interviews from 60 beneficiaries revealed that most (76%) were relatively new to mud crab culture, particularly fattening or growout, but 65% were gleaners of mud crabs for more than 5 years. The average age of respondents was 45 years old and were predominantly male. Most (93%) were married with an average household size of six. A cost and return analysis of mud crab fattening in pens using only two compartments showed that the net income (P4,832/month for a 30-day culture period) is not sufficient if shared among 40 PO members participating in only one economic activity. Consequently, most (63 %) respondents whose livelihood projects were cooperative undertaking were no longer keen with the cooperative-run project. Interestingly, those (83 %) who operated their own farm wanted to continue and expand (26 %), particularly those in Rosario. The motivation factors that influenced growers to continue mud crab culture and adopt the nursery technology being disseminated were primarily economic with extra income and source of cash as main reasons for adoption. Majority also claimed that the nursery technology that was being transferred by SEAFDEC/AQD was simple.

    The mud crab pond nursery technology transfer involved community training and participation of beneficiaries, beginning with the linking of technologists and socio-economists with on-the-ground partners. Thereafter, season-long training and farm demonstration followed comprising lecture series and hands-on demonstration. Nursery pond operations were conducted in an open pond (Rosario) and in a pond within a mangrove area (Pambujan). Survival in the pond within a mangrove area was higher (68 %) than in an open pond (50 %) for phase 1, suggesting that the mangrove played a role on mud crab endurance. However, survival in phase 2 (72 %, Pambujan; 83 %, Rosario) showed a reversed trend, suggesting that bigger crablets can withstand/endure harsh pond conditions.

    Results of the demonstration indicated that the nursery technology is a viable enterprise, showing an ROI of 93.50% in Rosario and 198.04% in Pambujan. Most (83%) of the growers were interested in the nursery technology, although only few PO members participated in the season-long training. Ownership of area, market, and farm distance from household were the more important considerations that influenced small-scale growers in adopting the technology.
  • Conference paper

    Mud crab marketing practices 

    AG Decembrana - In ET Quinitio, FD Parado-Estepa & RM Coloso (Eds.), Philippines : In the forefront of the mud crab industry development : proceedings of the 1st National Mud Crab Congress, 16-18 November 2015, Iloilo City, Philippines, 2017 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
    Presented in the article is the mud crab (Scylla spp.) marketing practices in the province of Capiz. It is one of the major producers of mud crab in brackishwater ponds in the country. Hence, several trading centers or buying stations are found in this province. In Pontevedra, Capiz alone, there are more than 20 buying stations. The crabs from ponds coming from Aklan, Iloilo and within Capiz are brought to the buying stations almost daily. There are 5 kinds of market in the mud crab trading business such as, households, local markets/restaurants, traders/buying, exporters, and importers. Methods in classifying and packing of crabs are also discussed.
  • Conference paper

    Development of aquasilviculture at BFAR-NBFTC, Pagbilao, Quezon 

    RE Dieta & FC Dieta - In ET Quinitio, FD Parado-Estepa & RM Coloso (Eds.), Philippines : In the forefront of the mud crab industry development : proceedings of the 1st National Mud Crab Congress, 16-18 November 2015, Iloilo City, Philippines, 2017 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
    Aquasilviculture technology verification project was conducted at the National Brackishwater Fisheries Technology Center (NBFTC) of the Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources (BFAR) in 1996-2000. Results indicated that given the proper technology, management and favourable market, and polyculture of high-value species (grouper (Epinephelus) and mud crab (Scylla)) will provide better return on investment. Dissemination of the technology through training started in 2001. In 2002, a 4-hectare undeveloped fishpond of NBFTC was converted into an aquasilviculture project to showcase the technical and economic feasibility of the technology with emphasis on the polyculture of mud crab, grouper and saline tilapia (Oreochromis) that would serve as a model livelihood project for coastal fisherfolk. In 2011, the BFAR launched the Philippine National Aquasilviculture Program to help restore mangroves that serve as breeding and nursery grounds of fish, and to provide livelihood projects through aquasilviculture to coastal fisherfolk. With increasing cost of development and management for aquasilviculture, integration of mangrove crab fattening and/or soft-shelled crab production have shown to improve profit under the present economic condition.
  • Conference paper

    Morphological deformities in mud crab Scylla serrata juveniles exposed to antibiotics during the larval stage 

    GS Pates Jr., ET Quinitio, GF Quinitio & FD Parado-Estepa - In ET Quinitio, FD Parado-Estepa & RM Coloso (Eds.), Philippines : In the forefront of the mud crab industry development : proceedings of the 1st National Mud Crab Congress, 16-18 November 2015, Iloilo City, Philippines, 2017 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
    The effects of antibiotics on the survival, growth and external deformities of mud crab Scylla serrata larvae and juveniles were determined. Zoeae were exposed to 0, 3, 6, 9, 12 mgL-1 oxytetracycline (OTC) and 0, 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2 mgL-1 furazolidone (furan) until the late megalopa in the first and second experiments. The treatments that gave the best results in the first and second experiments were conducted simultaneously in the third experiment. The surviving crab instar from each replicate were grown in nursery tanks for one month.

    Significantly higher survival and faster growth rate of Z5 were attained when 3 and 6 mgL-1 OTC or 0.5 and 1 mgL-1 furan were used. Morphological deformities observed in zoea 5 were bent dorsal, rostral and furcal spines. Percentage occurrence of morphological deformities was similar in all treatments. Significantly (P<0.05) higher survival and faster growth were attained among Z5 in the treatments using 3 mgL-1 OTC and 0.5 mL-1 furan in the third experiment. Morphological deformities observed in juveniles were fused frontal and lateral spines, asymmetrical and depressed tip of abdominal flap and gap between sternites. High percentage of deformities was observed in juveniles that were previously exposed to 6 mgL-1 OTC or 1.0 mgL-1 furan. There was no significant difference (P>0.05) observed in the survival of juveniles in both treatments of OTC and furan. However, growth was significantly (P<0.05) faster in lower concentrations of the two antibiotics.

    The study shows the apparent negative effects of antibiotics and highlights the need to eliminate or find alternatives, thereby preventing possible harm to the organisms and the environment.
  • Conference paper

    Induction of molting in hatchery-reared mud crab Scylla serrata juveniles through temperature manipulation or autotomy 

    JJDC Huervana - In ET Quinitio, FD Parado-Estepa & RM Coloso (Eds.), Philippines : In the forefront of the mud crab industry development : proceedings of the 1st National Mud Crab Congress, 16-18 November 2015, Iloilo City, Philippines, 2017 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
    The effects of water temperature and autotomy of chelipeds on growth, survival and molting of mud crab, Scylla serrata, juveniles were investigated under laboratory conditions in separate experiments. Hatchery-produced crabs at the intermolt stage with 2.0-2.3 cm carapace width and 1.7-2.2 g body weight were either exposed to temperature levels of 29, 32 and 35°C and ambient temperature of 24-31°C or subjected to autotomy (voluntary removal of one or two chelipeds). The crabs were allowed to molt twice prior to termination.

    All crabs held at 35°C had 100% mortality due to incomplete molting during the first molt. The mean survival of crabs upon termination was 58, 64 and 50% for ambient temperature, 29 and 32°C, respectively. Specific growth rate (SGR) of crabs in the ambient (2.83 ± 0.12%) and 29°C (3.02 ± 0.15%) were comparable but significantly lower than (P<0.01) those at 32°C (3.85 ± 0.28%). The molt interval of crabs was significantly shorter in treatments with constant water temperature (29°C: 32 ± 0.80 days, 32°C: 28 ± 1.11 days) compared to ambient temperature (39 ± 0.93 days).

    The survival of crabs with intact chelipeds (51.17 ± 3.56%) was comparable to those with one (50.55 ± 2.36%) or two (43.41 ± 1.59%) autotomized chelipeds. Juveniles with intact (5.80 ± 0.47%) or one autotomized cheliped (5.45 ± 0.30%) had a significantly higher SGR than crabs with both chelipeds autotomized (4.20 ± 0.52%) in the first molt. On the second molt, however, high SGR was observed in crabs with two chelipeds autotomized. The molt interval was significantly shorter in the autotomized crabs (one cheliped: 28 ± 1.66 days; two chelipeds: 23 ± 0.63 days) compared to those with intact chelipeds (36 ± 1.52 days). The results suggest that optimum water temperature for rearing S. serrata juveniles ranges from 29 to 32°C. Likewise, autotomy of one cheliped can promote molting without adversely affecting the growth and survival of the juveniles.
  • Conference paper

    Initiatives on mud crab culture at the Palawan Aquaculture Corporation 

    E Tech, C Emboltorio, D Galila, C Ogsimer & K Lim - In ET Quinitio, FD Parado-Estepa & RM Coloso (Eds.), Philippines : In the forefront of the mud crab industry development : proceedings of the 1st National Mud Crab Congress, 16-18 November 2015, Iloilo City, Philippines, 2017 - Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center
    Mud crab (Scylla spp) has long been a prime commodity in both local and global market and is regarded as one of the important high-value crustacean species produced in the Philippines. Decades ago, its culture basically relied on the availability of wild seedstock collected and grown to marketable size, or on wild lean adult crabs that were fattened for a short period.

    Developments and refinements in the hatchery and nursery techniques paved the way to bringing up culture activities to commercial levels. The Palawan Aquaculture Corporation embarked on mud crab culture in the mid 2014 where initial trials started. Collaboration with SEAFDEC/AQD was later forged bringing forth improvements in the hatchery, nursery and grow-out culture. Hatchery-reared juvenile crabs are now being sold.

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